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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"




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1501 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 15, 194-3, 11:00 A.M., Chairman Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Vhitmore, Brett, 

President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

There was discussion of the loss by fire of the Federal 
Works Agency building whicn was to have been used as a classroom 
and laboratory annex for Engineering and Chemistry. Treasurer 
Hawley spoke of conference which he had had recently with Mr. 
Buckley, Chairman of the Commission on Administration and Finance, 
Mr. Bixby, Budget Commissioner, and Mr. Nichols, Executive Secretary 
of the Public Building Commission on the subject of replacement of 
this building. It was estimated that replacement would cost 
$100,000 for the building and $31,000 for equipment and incidental 
expenses. The University has checked on availability of surplus 
buildings to be moved in and has obtained an estimate from 
Cunningham of Boston for construction of a one-story fire proof 
structure with 12-inch cement side walls, steel frame windows, and 
slab floor. Mr. Cunningham estimates that this building could be 
erected for 32 cents a foot on the old foundation and possibly for 
as low as 26 cents a foot. For $80,000 the University could obtain 
16,800 feet of floor space. This building could later be used as 
a central garage and repair shop. 

The men named felt that funds for this building could be 
provided from the veterans fund. Construction could be completed 
in four months. Mr. Nichols, however, is skeptical that the build- 
ing can be constructed for 32 cents a foot. 



Engineering 
Building 



1502 



COMMITTEE 



Deficiency- 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley suggested that the Trustees could ask 
for $131,090 as a deficiency appropriation to cover the cost of 
this building and equipment and an additional $110,64.0 which would 
be needed to cover expenses of the current year in operation of 
the University. The $110,640 to cover operations of the University 



is broken down as follows: 

Text books and supplies (this item is offset 

by increased tuition revenue) 
Grain 
Coal 

Boarding Hall (offset by revenue) 
Operation of Plant - personal service 
Plant maintenance 



After discussion, it was 



$20,000 

5,000 
30,6^0 
45,000 

5,000 
^JjfiSO 



$110,640 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to submit a 
request for a deficiency appropriation 
totaling $241,640 of which $131,000 is 
for replacement of building and equip- 
ment lost by fire and at $110,640 for 
maintenance as listed above. 

Treasurer Hawley reported on progress of the Engineering 
Laboratory Building. 

The Legislature appropriated $275,000 for construction of 
this building. Elans have been completed by the architect, and an 
estimate has been received from one construction fina in the amount 
of $391,000. The Public Building Commission is willing to add 
$50,000 or $60,000 to the appropriation but this would still leave 
a considerable balance to be provided. There was discussion of 
changing the type of building to cement construction as it does not 
seem possible to reduce the size of the building further and still 
do the work that needs to be done in the building when it is 
completed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported that contract has been signed 
for construction of the Physics Building with D. A. Sullivan of 
Northampton. 

The committee then discussed construction of a Dining 
Hall on the campus to serve approximately 1,000 students. 
Apparently the Governor is not willing to ask for this item put- 
side normal budget channels. Dr. Van Meter said that the 
University is resigned to feeding its students in the college 
year 194-3-49 without this building, but he sees no way that the 
University can take care of students in the year 1949-50 without 
it. Therefore, it would seem that the Trustees would need to ask 
the Legislature now for funds so that the building may be ready 
for the fall of 1949. The Public Building Commission is willing 
to put an architect on this job now out of funds of the Commission. 
After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Administration to add an 
item of $750,000 to the 1949 budget for 
construction of a Boarding Hall. 

Dr. Van Meter emphasized the need for completion of the 
main Engineering Building by September of 1949. He understands 
that the Public Building Commission has sent a letter to the 
Governor urging a study of Engineering needs at the University. 

The Trustees felt that they have carefully studied the 
need for Engineering as has the enlarged Board and that further 
study might result in delay which would imperil the ability of the 
University to handle the large number of engineers who will be on 
the campus in the fall of 1949- 



1 



03 



Dining 
Hall 



1504 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Taber said that he would arrange for a con- 
ference with the Governor to emphasize the need for rapid progress 
in the construction of this main Engineering Building. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the Attorney General had 
ruled against trust fund employees of the University being members 
of the State Retirement Association. It was suggested that this 
matter be referred to the appeal board of the Retirement Board. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 P.M. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

January 21, 194-S, 11:00 A.M., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Whitraore, Taber, Brett, 
Hubbard, Mrs. McNamara, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

Treasurer Hawley said that on August 31 > 19A4> the Board 

of Trustees granted to the Colonial Beacon Oil Company a permit to 

lay and maintain a 6-inch pipe line across premises of the Experi- 

ment Station in Waltham. The Company is now planning to transfer 

its interest in the pipe line to the Standard Oil Company of New 

Jersey which will assume all the liabilities of the Colonial Beacon 

Oil Company under this permit. After consideration, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees assent to 
the assignment of perpetual right and 
easement to lay and maintain two pipe lines 
across premises of the University of Massa- 
cnusetts Waltham Field Station at Waltham 
as granted to Colonial Beacon Oil Company 
under date of August 31> 1944- to Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey and to authorize 
the Treasurer to execute assignment in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

The Treasurer presented plans for the Engineering 

Laboratory Building as drawn by the architectural firm of Appleton 

and Stearns of Boston. After study of the plans, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve plans 
of the Engineering Laboratory Building as 
presented and authorize the Treasurer to sign 
construction contract for this building in 
the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that on January 10, 19-48, the 
two-story wooden building erected by the Federal Works Agency for 



1505 



Colonial Beacon 
Oil Company 



Standard Oil 
Company of New 
Jersey 



Engineering 
Building 



1506 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty Housing 

on 
Baker Lot 



Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

classrooms and laboratories for Engineering ana Chemistry was 
totally destroyed by fire. He recommended that the Trustees re- 
place this building with a one-story, fire proof structure, 
measuring 100 by 168 feet, to be built approximately on the founda- 
tion of the old building. This would be a permanent structure which 
could be used temporarily for classroom and laboratory purposed ana 
that ultimately as a central garage and repair shop which is 
urgently needed by the University. It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve this 
plan for replacement of the building lost by 
fire and to recommend that the Treasurer be 
authorized to execute contract for plans and 
construction of such building in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees if ana when the 
funds are provided. 

The Treasurer reported that the Campus Planning Council 
has recommended that the faculty housing units proposed for con- 
struction by the Alumni Building Association on a self-liquidating 
basis be located on the tract of land owned by the University 
situated north and west of Butterfield Terrace and known as the 
Baker lot. After consideration of other possible sites and study 
of campus plan, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 
this location for the faculty housing 
units, this action to take precedence 
over any previous actions of the Trustees 
governing use of this area. 

The Treasurer reported that the Alumni Building Associa- 
tion has filed bill with the Legislature for extension of their 
authorization for construction of self-liquidating dormitories, 
such extension to be in the amount of $1,000,000. The tentative 
plan of the Association is to construct three or four dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

under this authorization. While the present and most urgent need 

of the University" is for additional housing for men students, the 

long time program should include additional dormitories for women. 

After discussion of student numbers now and as projected 

for the next several years, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
proposal for construction of three Alumni 
dormitories in the women's area in the 
northern section of the campus to be used 
temporarily by men students but eventually 
to become women's dormitories, ana to 
recommend that if a fourth dormitory is 
constructed by the Alumni, it be a men's 
dormitory located in the men's housing area. 

The Treasurer reported that it appears likely that the 

Legislature will appropriate $350,000 for immediate construction 

of two additional cement block dormitories for the housing of men 



1507 



students. 



The Trustees have already located three cement block 



dormitories west of Federal Circle, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

construction of these two additional dormi- 
tories west of Federal Circle in the same 
area as the other three. 

The University now stands in urgent need of a Dining 

Commons to accommodate 1,000 students. Treasurer Hawley reported 

that the Public Building Commission has offered to provide 

architectural services for the preparation of preliminary plans 

ana specifications for such building under authority of Section 1 

of Chapter 92A of the General Laws. Location of the building is 

necessary at this time so that an architect may proceed. After 

discussion, it was 



Cement block 
dormitories 



Dining 
Commons 



1508 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the location of the proposed Dining Kail 
Commons in the area just north of the 
Experiment Station Headquarters Building. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 P.M. 




^Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY & PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 21, 1948, 2:00 P.M., Parker House, Boston 

Dr. Hubbard presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Hubbard, Desmond, 
Mrs. McNaiaara, President 
Van Meter, Secretary Burke 



50' 



President Van Meter presented recommendations for appoint T Apj 
ment of seven individuals to the grade of Professor. In each case 
the recommendation has initiated with the Head of a Department, 
has been approved by the Dean of the School, and the Dean of the 
University or the Director of the Experiment Station or Director 
of the Extension Service. Secretary Burke presented brief 
biography of each proposed appointee. Biographical sketches are 
appended to these minutes. After consideration of each candidate, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following appointments to the grade of 
Professor. 

Alfred A. Erown to Professor of Agricultural Economics 
effective February 1, 1948. 

Allen E. Andersen to Professor and Head of Department 
of Mathematics effective February 1, 194-8. 

Maxwell H. Goldberg to Professor of English effective 
February 1, 19^8. 

Clarence H. Parsons to Extension Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry effective February 1, 1948. 

Franklin V. Southwick to Research Professor of 
Pomology effective January 1, 1948. 

Ellsworth H. Wheeler to Extension Professor of 
Entomology effective January 1, 1948. 

Merit P. White to Professor of Civil Engineering 
effective February 1, 1948. 



1510 



COMMITTEE 



Sabbatical 

leave - 

Richard C. Foley 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee members congratulated Presicent Van Meter 
on the selection of these seven individuals whom they considered 
to be of outstanding caliber. Dr. Van Meter said that the new 
salary schedule has helped but even so there is intense competition 
for good men. He said the University is fortunate in having a 
group of administrators, teachers, ana research workers who are 
keenly interested in the welfare of the University. 

On recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
sab£>atical leave for Pdchard C. Foley, 
Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 
on the six months, full-pay basis beginning 
August 1, 194-8 9 so that he may study for a 
doctor's degree in the field of Dairy 
Husbandry. 

President Van Meter presented thirteen new courses which 

have been approved by the Faculty Committee on Course of Study, 

by the Dean, and by the President. After discussion, it was 

V OTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following new courses of study. 

Home Economics 55. (I) CHILD NUTRITION. ~ A study is made of 
nutritional needs from prenatal life through infancy and child- 
hood. Methods of judging nutrition and causes and effects of 
malnutrition are discussed. Menus for children and measures to 
insure the consumption of optional diets are put into practice 
with laboratory work in the nursery school. 

3 class hours Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites, Home Economics 52 and 54-. 

Home Economics 57. (I) CLOTHING SELECTION AND SIMPLE CONSTRUCTION. 
(for non-majors) This course is designed to stimulate an interest 
in good workmanship. Emphasis is given to construction techniques 
such as fitting, pattern use and altering. Special attention is 
given to speed and independence of work. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 2. 

Home Economics 88. (II) APPLIED DRESS DESIGN. — Costume design 

by drawing and draping, using textures of unusual nature. Emphasis 

will be placed on fitting and adapting design to figure. 

3 2-hour laboratory periods Credit, 3* 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 87, or its equivalent. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Political Science 67. (I) INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENT (1948-49) . — 

A study of world organization in the twentieth century, with 

emphasis upon the League of Nations, the World Court, and the 

United Nations and its affiliated agencies. Given in alternate 

years. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Political Science 68. (II) INTERNATIONAL LAW (1948-49). — A study 
of the origin and character of international law, and its functions 
in the relations between national states. Given in alternate 
years . 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Geology 50. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY. — A general course in engineer- 
ing geology stressing earth structure, the dynamic processes, and 
agents of weathering. The laboratory work consists of mineral and 
rock-determination and map reading as related to the phenomena of 
physical geology. 

2 class hours j 1 3-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3. 

Forestry 27. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. — The use of 
natural resources of the United States including, soil, water, 
minerals, forests, grasslands and wildlife. Includes discussions 
of the historic background and past and present use of basic 
natural resources in relation to social and economic welfare. 
Juniors and Seniors may elect. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Forestry 72. (II) FORESTRY-ANIMAL RELATIONSHIPS. — Effects of 
animals on the forests. Also the effects of forest practices on 
wild animal production. Economic aspects of forest-animal re- 
lationships. Open to forest majors only. 
3 class periods. Credit, 3« 

Spanish 73. (I), 74-. (II) THE GOLDEN AGE (1949-50). — Readings 
from Cervantes, Lope de vega, Calderon, Garcilaso and others. 
Composition and conversation. Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory, period. 

History 81 (I) DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1776-1900. 
The history of American foreign policy and its basic factors to 
the end of the nineteenth century. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites, History 59 and 60 or the consent of the Instructor. 

Psychology 28. (II) ADVANCED GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. — A detailed 
consideration of some of the major problems of psychology. Topics 
considered include motivation, emotion, neural relationships, 
learning, perception, and sensory processes. Stress is placed on 
methodology, theoretical implications, and recent investigations. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3* 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26. 



1511 



1512 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Sociology 78. (II) CRIMINOLOGY. — A study of the nature of 
crime and the factors underlying criminal behavior. Attention is 
also given to the machinery of justice in criminal behavior: the 
law, the courts, police enforcement, penal and correctional insti- 
tutions. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 23 and 75 • 

English 83. (I) TECHNICAL WRITING. — A course in factual and 

inductive exposition with special emphasis upon process reports 

and thesis preparation. For juniors and seniors in the School of 

Engineering. 

2 class hours. Credit, 2. 

Prerequisites, English 1 and 2 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 J 15 P.M. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ALFRED A. BROWN 

Mr. Alfred A. Brown was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts 
in 1908. He is a graduate of Massachusetts State College with a 
B.S. degree in 1931 and an M.S. in 1933- He came to this College in 
1936 as an Assistant Research Professor of Agricultural Economics 
and was promoted to Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
in 1947. 

ALLEN E. ANDERSEN 

was born December 17, 1899 at Viborg, South Dakota. He 
graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1923 with the A.B. de- 
gree and received his M.A. degree from the same institution in 1924. 
He received his Ph.D. degree from Harvard in 1934- Kis previo as 
experience is as follows: 

Principal, Rosalie High School, 1921-22. 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics, Univ. of Nebraska, 1922-24, 
Instructor in Mathematics, Univ. of Oklahoma, 1924-25 ► 
Assistant Professor, Mathematics, State Teachers College, 

Kirksville, Missouri, 1925-23. 
Instructor, Mathematics, Harvard, 1929-32. 
Instructor, Mathematics, Worcester Poly. Inst., 1932-33* 
Professor of Mathematics- a_ad ©faairman of the Department, 
Wagner College, 1933-36. 

In September 1937, Dr. Andersen was appointed Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts. He is 
a memoer of Sigma Xi. 

MAXW ELL H ENP.Y GOLDBERG 

was born October 23, 1907. He received his B.S. from 
Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1928; his M.A. from lale in 
1932 and his Ph.D. from Yale in 1933. He was appointed Instructor 
in English here in 1923; promoted to Assistant Professor in -^glish 
in 1934, and promoted to Associate Professor in 1946. Dr. Goldberg 
is a member of Phi Kappa Phi. He is married and has three children. 

ChAREKuE H. P ARSONS 

was born July 16, 1904. He has a B.S. degree from the 
University of Massachusetts in 1927 and a M.S. degree from the same 
University in 1933* His previous experience is as follows: 
Ins tractor, Animal Husbandry, University of Massachusetts 1928-29. 
Synthetic Nitrogen Products Corporation 1929-30. Assistant 
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Superintendent of College Farm 
from 1931-46. He left here to manage a private estate and is now 
employed as Farm Manager at the Grafton gtate Hospital. He is 
married and has four children. 

FRAKKlYN V. SOUTHWTCK 



1513 



is 30 years old. He took his undergraduate work here 
although his home was in New York. He was an outstanding student. 
He went to Ohio State University for a year of graduate work and an 
M.S. degree under the late Dr. -J. H. Gourley, whom he served as 
Graduate Assistant and who considered him one of the most promising 
students he had ever had. Then he moved to Cornell University as 



1514 



/ 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Graduate Assistant to Dr. Heinicks for a Ph.D. and to the 
University of Connecticut in 1943 as Assistant Professor of 
Pomology. In 194-5 he went back to Cornell as Assistant Professor 
of Pomology. He has published eight research reports of high 
caliber in the last two years in addition to some teaching at 
Cornell. 

ELLSWORT H HAINES wHS ELER 

Mr. Wheeler graduated from the University of Massachusetts 
in 1926, obtained his Master's degree in 1937 and his Doctor* 3 de- 
gree in 194.6 from Cornell University. At present he is a member of 
the staff of Geneva Station at Cornell University. He has held the 
following positions: 

Temporary assistant, Department of Entomology and assistant 

meteorologist, Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station, summers of 1925-27; Graduate Scholarship in Biology, 
Cornell University, 1926-27; Assistant in Biology, Cornell 
University, 1927-28; Biologist for N.Y.S. Conservation De- 
partment, Biological Survey, summers of 1928, 1934-1939; 
Assistant in Entomology N.Y.S. Agricultural Experiment 
Station, summers of 1929-1932, Instructor, Department of 
Biology, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1928-1936; 
Assistant Professor, 1936-1942; Acting Assistant Professor, 
N.Y.S. Agricultural Experiment Station, 1942-194-6; Assistant 
Professor, 1946— . 

Dr. Wheeler has published the results of 11 o£ his research 
studies and has 3 more in the process for publication. He has 
participated frequently in the Extension programs at Cornell 
University of insect control. 

MERIT P. WHITE 

received his A.B. from Dartmouth College in 1930 and his 
C.E. degree from the Thayer School of Civil Engineering in 1931* 
He received his M.S. in C.E. from the California Institute of 
Technology in 1932 and his Ph.D. (magna cum laude) from the same 
school in 1935. From 1935 to 1937 his position was that of Junior 
and Assistant Engineer at the Cooperative Hydraulics Laboratory at 
the California Institute of Technology worlcing on the design of 
the laboratory and carrying out hydraulic experiments. 

From 1937 to 1938 he was a Research Associate at the 
Graduate School of Engineering at Harvard University where he worked 
on the vibration of structures during earthquakes. Mr. White then 
returned to California Institute of Technology where he continued 
work on the earthquake effects on buildings under a research pro- 
gram financed by the County of Los Angeles. From 1938 to 1942 he 
was Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering at the Illinois 
Institute of Technology in Chicago and was promoted to an Associate 
Professorship but resigned to do war research at Princeton 
University. 



I 



IMMITTEE 



1515 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

From 1942 to 194-4- he was Senior Technical Aide and 
Secretary, Division 2 of the National Defense Research Committee. 
From April to December 1944- he was Scientific Liaison Officer 
representing Division 2, N.D.R.C. at the London Mission of 
O.S.R.D. From January to June 194-5 he was Technical Consultant to 
the Joint Target Group for Assistant Chief for Air Staff, 
Intelligence, preparing recommendations for aerial war in the 
Pacific. From June to November 194-5 Mr. White was Bomb Damage 
Analyst for the U. S. Strategic Bombing Survey evaluating the 
effect of aerial war on Germany, especially as it affected sub- 
marine shelters ana buildings. Then followed three months as 
Editor of Summary Technical Report, Division 2, N.D.R.C. preparing 
the final reports of war work of this division. 

From April 194-6 to the present he has been Scientific 
Consultant, Science Branch, Field Information Agency, Technical 
Office of Military Government for Germany, War Dept. supervising 
the work of about 125 German physicists who are preparing 15 
volumes describing all non-military research in Physics in Germany 
during the war years. Mr. White is a member of Sigma Xi, Phi 
Betta Kappa, honorary societies and the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is 
39 years of age and not married. 



1516 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



February 9, 194-8 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter from Treasurer Hawley to the 

Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 

of Massachusetts dated February 2, 194-8 and resultant mail 

ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the 



Board. 



February 2, 19A8 



To: Executive Committee, 
Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The Board of Trustees at its annual meeting re- 
ferred to the Executive Committee with power, the selection 
of an Architect for the proposed Boarding Commons Building. 
Chairman Bartlett has authorized me to take this mail poll 
of the members of the Committee. 

It is my recommendation that the firm of Morris 
W. Maloney and Henry J. Tessier, Architect of Springfield, 
Mass., be selected for this project. This firm has had 
particular experience in the planning of large kitchen and 
dining hall units, having done the Dining Hall at the 
State Hospital at Northampton and the Lymon School at 
Westboro. They have done, and are doing other large build- 
ings, including the Holyoke Y M C A, the Fitchburg Y M C A, 
and the Veterans Housing Project of Springfield. We have 
visited their office and inquired into their standing and 
believe they are capable of handling this project quickly 
and efficiently. 

Ballot and stamped envelope is enclosed and your 
early response will be appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



1517 



Dining 
Commons - 

architect 



1518 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mail Ballot 

In accordance with the information contained in the 
Treasurer's letter of February 2, 194-3 

I do 
approve the selection of the firm of Morris W. Maloney and 
Henry J. Tessier of Springfield as Architects for the proposed 



Boarding Commons. 



Signed: 



J. W. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 
Lottie A. Leach 
P. F. Vhitmore 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON EXPERIMENT STATION 
March 31, 1943, 10:30 A.M., Bowditch Lodge, Amherst 

Chairman Brett presiding 



1519 



PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Vhitmore, Deely, 

Chandler, Dr. Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke, Director 
Sievers and the professional staff 
of the Experiment Station. 

Chairman Brett said that the Committee was interested in 

learning more of the work done by the Experiment Station. In this 

fast moving world, research is of tremendous importance and hence 

the work of the Experiment Station is among the most important at 

the University. 



Following is the program of the meeting! 



10:30 
11:00 
11:20 
11:40 

12:00 

1:00 
1:30 
1:50 

2:10 



Introductory Remarks 
Animal Nutrition 
Food Technology 
Poultry Science 

Luncheon 

Introductions 

Agronomy 

Human Nutrition 



Mr. Sievers 
Prof. Archibald 
Prof. Fellers 
Prof. Jeffrey 

Draper Hall 

Mr. Brett 
Prof. Sieling 
Prof. Mitchell 



Visitation of Laboratories: 
Mastitis Laboratory 
Pullorum Disease Laboratory 
Dutch Elm Disease Laboratory 
Food Technology Laboratory 

No formal business was conducted. The group dispersed 

at U o'clock. 




Secretary 



1520 



COMMITTEE 



Engineering 
Annex 



Cement Block 
Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



April 6, 1943 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated March 23, 194-3 from Robert D* 

Havley, Treasurer of the University, to the Executive Committee of 

the Board of Trustees and the resultant mail ballot are hereby 

made part of the official records of the Board. 

March 23, 1943 

To: Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 

Gentlemen: 

Acting upon a Special Message of the Governor, the Legis- 
lature has appropriated $350,000 for the Construction of Two 
Additional Cement-Block Dormitories and $120,000 for the Con- 
struction of an Engineering Annex, a building to replace the one 
lost by fire last January. These buildings will be urgently 
needed next fall, so that it is necessary to get construction 
started just as soon as possible. 

At the January Meeting, the Trustees approved the 
appointment of Mr. Ross, as Architect for the Engineering Annex, 
and authorized the Treasurer to make contract for architectural 
services and construction. We now need similar Trustee authoriza- 
tion for the arcnitectural services and construction of the 
cement-block dormitories. These buildings will be of similar 
design and construction to those now being constructed and will 
be located in the same section according to the plot plan approved 
by the Trustees. 

it is, of course, advisable to continue the service of 
the architect, Alderman and Alderman, who is willing to provide 
the necessary architectural services on these buildings on the 
same basis as his present contract, plus an additional fee of 
$500 to cover the cost of some interior changes which we wish to 
make in these buildings. We have been over the terms of this 
contract with the Director of the Public Building Commission who 
agrees that it is fair and reasonable. The architect's contract 
provides only half the six percent fee for duplicate buildings, 
which half covers plans for utility services and supervision of 
construction 



1521 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



in order to save time, i am submitting this explanation 
to the Executive Committee of the Board with the request for 
their action concerning architectural services and construction 
of these cement-block dormitories. Ballot is enclosed with return 
stamped envelope for indicating your decision. 



Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



Mail Ballot 



In accordance with the information contained in the 
Treasurer 1 s letter of March 23> I hereby approve X do not 
appro ve^ ______ 



.the following: 



That two additional cement- block buildings be erected 
in the south-west campus site previously approved, that the firm 
Alderman and Alderman be appointed Architect and that the 
Treasurer be authorized to execute contracts for architectural 
service and construction in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees. 



Signed: 



Lottie A. Leach 
P. F. ^"hitmore 
Leonard Carmichael 
A. C. Brett 




Secretary 



1522 



COMMITTEE 



Academics 

Activities 

Coaches 

Arthur E. Niedeck 



Courses - 

Chemical 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOAi^D OF TRUSTEES 
April 14, 1943, 11:00 A.**., Chairman Bartlett' s Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Carmichael 

Mrs. Leach, Whitmore, Acting President 
Van -ieter, Treasurer Hawley, Secretary- 
Burke. 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of minutes of the last meeting. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize payment from Academics Activities 
Funds of $75.00 to Professor Arthur E. Niedeck 
for extra service as coach of the Roister 
Doisters for the first semester of the 1947-4-3 
college year. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty Course of Study 

Committee ana of Acting President Van dieter, it was 

VOTED: To approve the following curriculum for 
Chemical Engineering: 



Freshman iear 



1st Semester 
M.E.I, Engin. Drawing 
English 1, Composition 
Chemistry 1, General 
Math. 5 , Anal. Greom. 
German 1 



2nd Semester 



3 
3 
3 

3 

-1 
15 



M.E.3, De scrip, geometry 
English 2, Composition 
Chemistry 2, General 
i-lath.6, Diff. Calc. 
German 2 



3 
3 
3 
3 

.1 

15 



So phomore Year 



1st Semester 
Physics 25, General 
English 25 

Chem. 29, Qualitative 
Math. 31, Int. Calc. 
Economics 25 



2nd Semester 



4 
3 
4 
4 

Jl 
13 



Physics 26, General 
English 26 

Chem. 30, Quantitative 
math. 32, Diff. Equations 
C.E. 34, Statics 



4 
3 
4 

4 

13 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Junior Year 



1st Semester 
Chem. 51, Organic I 
Chem. 65, Physical I 
Chem. Engin. 1, Calculations 
Chem. Engin. 2, Industrial 
C.E. 53, Strength of Hat's 



1st Semester 
M.E.6l,Mat f ls Testing Lab. 
Chem. Engl n. 6, Unit Oper.II 
C.E. 7, Thermody II 
C.E. 8, Projects I 
C.E. 5, Foreign Chem. Lit. 
E.E., Element A.C. & D.C. 



2nci Semester 



A 
A 
A 
3 

-1 
13 



2 

5 
3 

2 

3 

Jt 
19 



Chem. 52, Organic II 
Chem. 66, Physical II 
M. E. 63, Thermo. 
C.E. 4, Unit Operation I 
Elem,.Technical German 



2nd Semester 
Chem. Engin. 59, Unit Proces. 
Chem. Engin. 60, Fro j ects II 
M.E. 72, Metallurgy 
Psychology 26 
History 6 



A 
A 
3 
3 

Jl 
17 



3 
6 
2 
3 

.1 
17 



Dr. Van Meter reported that several members of the State 
Department of Public Health are housed on the campus in the 
Bacteriology building. These men are working closely "with our de- 
partment and some of the members g,ive courses which are listed in 
the catalogue but for which they receive no compensation from the 
University. He felt that it woula be proper to give recognition 
for this service by listing individuals giving courses in the 
catalogue as visiting lecturers. Upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the administration to list in 
the catalogue as Visiting Lecturers members 
of the Department of Public Health who give 
credit courses at the University. 

Dr. Van Meter distributed copies of a report adopted at 

Boston on February 28 by Presidents of the Land-Grant Colleges of 

New Englana. He said that the Presidents nave been meeting at 

least once a year to discuss mutual problems and recently they have 

haa under advisement the question of cooperation on certain courses 

of study. For example, one of the six colleges may have a well 

developed School of Social Science, another an outstanding 



1 5^0 



Public Health 



Visiting 
Lecturers 



Land-Grant 
Colleges 



1524 



COMMITTEE 



Frederick E. Cole 

Ext. Prof, of 
Agric. Ec. 



Robert E. Young 



Asst. Pes. Prof, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Landscape Architecture. The Presidents have felt 

that it might be •wise to make arrangements -whereby a student from 

any of the six colleges could transfer in his junior ana senior 

year to the college best qualified to offer studies in his major 

field. This vould prevent needless duplication of certain areas 

of study where there vould not be sufficient numbers of students 

for the field of study to be developed in each of the six states. 

Veterinary i4edicine might be another subject in this category. 

Acting President Van deter said that the Boards of 

Trustees of the other five New England Land-Grant Colleges have 

already adopted a resolution favoring cooperation of this kind and 

upon his recommendation, it was 

RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts records hereby its acceptance of the 
principle of mutual interest and cooperation in such 
areas as may from time to time be mutually deemed ex- 
pedient, and further, indicate its willingness to adopt 
such policies and programs as may be necessary for the 
implementation of acceptable programs of cooperation 
between the several institutions. 

Upon the recommendation of Director Munson of the Exten- 
sion Service and of Acting President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To approve appointment of Frederick E. Cole 
as Extension Professor of Agricultural 
Economics effective March 15, 194.3 at annual 
salary of $5100, 

Upon the recommendation of Grant Snyder, Head of the De- 
partment of Olericulture, and of Acting President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To include in the supplementary Budget re- 
quest for the promotion of Robert E. Young 
from Assistant Research Professor at the 
"Waltham Field Station to Associate Research 
Professor. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Secretary Burke reported that the Commission on Administra- 
tion & Finance had set up rules and regulations in 194-3 governing 
vacation and sick leave. The rules as published by the Commission 
stated that they did not apply to teachers and supervisors in the 
schools in the Department of Education whose weeks of service and 
basis of payment of salary are regulated by the last sentence of 
Section 31 of Chapter 29 of the General Laws. The Secretary said 
that the University assumed, since the Commission did not include 
teachers in its rules, that the University was free to adopt its 
own procedure governing sick leave for teachers. Recently, however 
the Personnel Office has informed the University that it has no 
authority for granting of sick leave to teachers. The University 
checked with Commissioner Desmond and founa that in 1944- the De- 
partment of Education recommended that the Commission on Ad- 
ministration & Finance authorize sick leave for teachers on the 
basis of 9 days per year retroactively accumulative. The Commission 
on Administration & Finance said that it had no jurisdiction, 
"which left the Department of Education free to put its plan into 
effect ana it has done so. After discussion, the committee 



'..- 



VOTED: 



To approve a sick leave plan for teachers at 
the University on the basis of 10 working 
days leave per year with the understanding 
that teachers would receive credit for each 
year of service since the date of their 
initial appointment and that any unused 
leave may continue to accumulate just as in 
the case of other state employees who are 
governed by the Commission's rules. 

It was also 



VOTED: To request that the Chairman inform the 
Commission of the plan adopted by the 

Board. 



525 



Sick Leave 
for 

Professional 
Staff 



1526 



COMMITTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



James Bryant 
Conant 



500 KW Steam 
Turbine 



North College 
Roof 



Dining 
Commons 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion of the award of honorary degrees at 

the June Commencement in 194.3 and with the following exception, it 

was 

VOTED : To refer award of Honorary Degrees to the 
Full Board. 

On the recommendation of Dr. Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To award the degree LL.D. to James Bryant 
Conant, President of Harvard University at 
the Commencement in June 194-3 with the cus- 
tomary provision that Dr. Conant receive the 
degree in person. 

Acting President Van Meter said that he wanted to ask 
Dr. Conant to be the speaker at Commencement. It was the feeling 
of the committee that if Dr. Conant is unable to be the speaker 
this year, it would be in order to postpone awarding of an honorary 
until 1949. 

Treasurer Hawley said that under the Repairs and Re- 
newals Program of the current year, two projects which have been 
approved by the Commission on Administration & Finance require 

execution of contracts. These are for the repair of the 500 KW 
Steam Turbine at estimated cost of $12,000 and Repairs to North 

College roof at estimated cost of $6500. On the recommendation of 

the Treasurer and Acting President, it was 

VOTED: To approve projects for the Repair of the 500 
KW Steam Turbine and Repairs to North College 
roof and to authorize the Treasurer to execute 
contracts for this work in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley said that in May of 1947, the Trustee 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds voted on recommendation of the 
President and the Campus Planning Council to locate the new Board- 
ing Hall on the main highway just north of the Experiment Station. 
Further study has been made of the site since that time and it has 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been agreed by those concerned that location of the Boarding Hall 

on this site will create several problems. The building will have 

to be serviced from the front and garbage hauled from the front. 

There is inadequate room for parking when the Boarding Hall will be 

used by groups meeting on the campus. Further, this location will 

restrict use of the area for dormitories for women. 

The Campus Planning Council has recommended a new site 

and this is also strongly recommended by the Acting President. 

Three members of the Buildings and Grounds Committee considered and 

approved the new site. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize location of the new Boarding 
Kail on a site east of the East Experiment 
Station and south of the walk to Lewis and 
Thatcher dormitories as shown on site plan 
prepared by Professor Otto dated April 9, 1943. 

Dr. Van Meter recommended that the Trustees authorize the 

Administration to submit a Supplementary Budget to cover certain 

needs of the University which, could not have been foreseen at the 

time the original budget was presented and also to cover certain 

requests wnich were in the original budget but which were not 

approved by the Legislature. The Trustees considered the budget 

item by item as recommended by the Acting President, and it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Administration to present 
the following Supplementary Budget. 

COPY ATTACHED 



1527 



Supplementary- 
Budget 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:45 P.^I. 




T?£c£ 




-_^ Secreta iy 



1528 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



April 13, 1948 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
SUPPLEMENTA RY BUDGET FOR 1^9 

The following request for supplementary appropriation for the fiscal 
year 1949 is submitted to meet emergency requirements of the University which 
financial provision has not been made. 

II. INSTRUCTION 

Summer Session Salaries $30,000 

No provision has been made for Summer Session 
Salaries ana funds must be provided or the session 
cancelled. An enrollment of 4.00 students (mostly 
veterans) is expected. 46 teachers will be required 
full and part-time. Tuition income is estimated to 
exceed $40,000, 

Regular Instruction Salaries 

The following additional positions and changes 
are needed to meet the needs of the University during 
the next years 

2 Instructors, Chemistry . $4-600 
1 Associate Professor, Business Admin, 3650 
1 Assistant Professor, Business Admin. 2800 

3 Instructors, Business Admin. 6900 
1 Professor, Landscape Architecture 5100 
1 Assistant Professor, Zoology 3360 
1 Junior Clerk, Zoology 1380 

14 Proctors for Naw Dormitories 5700 

1 Nurse for Infirmary 1360 

1 Technical Assistant, Visual Education 2190 
Summer employment for staff in Bngi- ..fflffP,,.,— „i, 

neering 

Reclassification 

Vacant position of Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Science to Professor 1740 

$44*280 

The following additional service is needed in 
the Dean's Offices 
Dean of Men $5100 

2 Junior Clerks 3120 

3,220 



»«c~ 



The following positions in the Office of the 
Director of Short Courses are recommended for re- 
classification t 



K. M. Martin from Senior Clerk and 
Stenographer to Principal Clerk 

C, Heffernan from Junior Clerk and 
Stenographer to Senior Clerk 



$210 



::; . 



Grand Total, 182,800 



I?. EXPERIMENT STATION 



Dutch Elm Disease Control Program 

Four automobiles for Dutch Elm 

Disease Control* 



low dependent upon four cars be- 
longing to U.S.D.A. which are inadequate 
and may be withdrawn. 

The following reclassification of 
positions is recommended? 

Robert E, Xoung « from Assistant Pro- 
fessor Research at Walthara Field Station 

to Associate Professor 



William J« Garland - frosa Technical 
Assistant Research at Valtham Field Station 
to Instructor (Research Assistant) , Mi iy) 






V. CONTROL SERVICES 



The following reclassification of 
positions is recommended i 

John W. luzmeski from Chief of Laboratory to 
Professor $9&) 

Albert Spelman from Senior Chemist to 
Associate Professor 900 

C s Tyson Smith from Assistant Chemist to 
Assistant Professor 24.0 



16210 



Vacant position from Assistant Chemist to 
Assistant Professor 2415 



-3- 



J. A. Bart from Junior Chemist to Instructor 
(Research Assistant) ft ffi P, 

$2380 

VI. OPERATION OF PLANT 

a. Plans for Public Health Building f50,000 

Chapter 599 of the Acts of 1947 authorizes 
the Trustees of the University to participate in 
the Federal Hospital Construction Program by 
taking advantage of Federal Grant to be supple- 
mented by State appropriation for the construction 
of a Public Health Building on the Campus to be 
used cooperatively by the State Department of 
Public Health and the University, 

In order to become eligible for Federal Funds 
and to insure participation in this program, it is 
necessary to have complete building plans* Since 
the original budget of the University was submitted, 
the Federal Government has approved the program for 
Massachusetts including this proposed building. 

Therefore, it is essential that plans and 
specifications be prepared at the earliest date to 
avoid loss of Federal Funds, The requested appro- 
priation is to provide for architectural services 
for this purpose, . 

b. Two Quonset-Type Federal Surplus Buildings, 

40 ft. x 100 ft. $25,000 

The Federal Works Agency is holding these 
buildings for the University for donation. The 
cost to us is for removal, re-erection, founda- 
tions and utilities services. The space is 
urgently needed for our expanding program, 
particularly for Agriculture and Engineering, It 
provides very low-cost space, 

711. BOARDING HAu, 

Cost of extra operation for American Institute 
of Cooperation #11,250 

Since submission of original budget, arrange- 
ments have been completed for holding the American 
Institute of Cooperation at the University, 
August 30 to September 3, 1943. 1,500 persons are 
expected to attend, most of whom will be housed and 
fed on the Campus, This additional cost to the . ' 
Boarding Hall cannot be met from funds already appro- 
priated and leave sufficient for feeding the student 
population. Income will more than offset expenditures. 



UMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
August IS, 1948, 12:15 P.M., Chairman Bartlett's Office, Boston 

PRESEKT; Chairman Bartlett, Mr. Brett, 

President Van Meter and Treasurer 
Hawley 

In accordance with authorization by the Board of Trustees 
at its meeting on June 5, 194-3, the committee considered proposed 
lease of land to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association and proposed building lease from the Association and, 



it was 



VOTED : That the form of lease of four parcels of land 
for the erection of three student dormitories 
and a faculty housing group of units from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to University of 
Massachusetts Building Association, pursuant to 
Acts of 1939, Chepter 338, as amended by Acts 
of 194-5, Chapter 390, arc! by Acts of 1946, 
Chapter 352, and by Acts of 1943, Chapter I85, 
be and hereby is approved as presented to this 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts or a majority thereof, be and 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on behalf 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially in 
the form presented to this meeting, said lease 
of land from the Commonwealth to the Association 
and to cause the common seal of the University 
of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

VOTED : That the form of lease of three student dormitories 
and a faculty housing group of units by University 
of Massachusetts Building Association to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, pursuant to Acts of 
1939, Chapter 333, as amended by Acts of 1945, 
Chapter 390, and by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, and 
by Acts of 1943, Chapter 135, said buildings to be 
erected by said Association on four parcels of 
lend to be leased to it by the Commonwealth, be 



&U 



Land - 
lease of 



Dormitories 



1530 



COMMITTEE 



Hemond, Conrad, J^ 

plans for 
water and 
sewer line 



Dutch Elm 

Disease 

Laboratory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and hereby is approved as presented to this 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof 
be and hereby are authorized in the name of 
and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in or substantially in the form presented to 
this meeting, said lease of buildings from said 
Association to the Commonwealth and to cause 
the common seal of the University of Massachusetts 
to be affixed thereto. 

Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was 



Powers 
property 



VOTED: To approve the appointment of Conrad Hemond, Jr. 
as Engineer for preparation of plans for water 
and sewer line, under Project P-E2 and to 
authorize the Treasurer to execute a contract 
with Mr. Hemond for these services, in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees. 

The Treasurer reported upon the progress of the con- 
struction of the Laboratory Building for Dutch Elm Disease Control 
and upon his recommendation, it was 

VOTED: To approve plans for the Dutch Elm Laboratory 
Building as presented, and to authorize the 
Treasurer- to execute contract for construction, 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

The status of the proposed acquisition of the property 

of the late Thomas Powers was explained. The Executor for the 

estate has requested that the Trustees make an offer for this 

property so that he may secure clearance from the court and 

necessary authority for the transfer of the property. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to offer the Executor 
of the estate of Thomas Powers the sum of 
$10,000 for all land and buildings situated on 
Stockbridge Foad, of the University campus with 
the understanding that all expense involved in 
the execution and transfer of this property to- 
gether with taxes for the year 194-3 will be met 
by the estate, and with the understanding that 
Miss Mary Ann Powers, sister of the late Thomas 
Powers, and residing at the property, will have 
full use of the property without rental payment 
to the University during her lifetime, but she 
will be responsible for all maintenance of the 



1531 



V1MITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



property and agree to keep it in good order. 
The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 P.M. 




1532 



COMMITTEE 



Waltham Field 
Station - for 
improvements 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



November 17, 19^3 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter of November 5, 194-8 from Treasurer 

Hawley to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, 

University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail poll are hereby 

made part of the official records of the Board of Trustees. 

November 5, 19 A8 

To: Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 

Gentlemen: 

There were two Special Appropriations by the Legislature 

of 194-8 for Improvements at the Waltham Field Station, as follows: 



Chain Link Fence 
Greenhouse Construction 



115,000.00 
9,000.00 



Plans and specifications were prepared for these con- 
struction projects. They were advertised and bids were received. 
The low bidder on the Fence Project is the Anchor Post Products 
Company, Inc., with a bid of $13,653.00. 

The low bid on the Greenhouse Project is Lord and 
Burnham, with a bid of $8,946.00. 

These projects have been approved by the Massachusetts 
Public Building Commission and the Commission on Administration and 
Finance, and we are ready to execute contracts with the low bidders. 
This letter is to request Trustee authority for the execution of the 
construction contracts which will be in the regular form authorized 
by the Public Building Commission. Mail ballot is enclosed and it 
will be greatly appreciated if the Trustees will express their 



153. 



MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



decision in this matter promptly by mail. 



Very truly yours, 
/s/ Robert D. Hawley 



Mail Poll 

In accordance with the information in the Treasurer's letter 
of November 5> 194-3, I hereby vote: To approve authorization to 
the Treasurer to execute contracts in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees with the Anchor Post Products Co., Inc. for the 
construction of Chain Link Fence at Valtham Field Station, and 
with the Lord and Burnham Company for the Construction of Green- 
house at Waltham Field Station. 

Signed: Leonard Carmichael 
Lottie A. Leach 
A. C. Brett 
Joseoh W. Bartlett 




_Secretary 



1534 



COMMITTEE 



Nev 

Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Meeting of Trustee Committee on 
Faculty & Program of Study 

January 12, 1949, 2:00 P.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Mrs. McNamara presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Hubbard, Brown, Mrs. McNamara, 
President Van Meter, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

President Van Meter said that it has become necessary to 

add a number of new courses to complete requirements for major 

study in certain fields and to round out new programs J . of " ins true- . 

tion now being offered. Ke said that each of the new courses that 

he would present has been suggested by the department concerned, 

approved by the school in which the department is located, and then 

acted on by the University Course of Study Committee of which Dean 

Mac lime r is the Chairman. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
attached new courts es of study. 

After discussion, it was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
attached new courses of study in the 
Graduate School. 

President Van Meter recommended two men for appointment 
to full Professorships. He explained that the right candidate for 
a given position is usually located after a wide search and it 
sometimes happens that the man is found shortly before the appoint- 
ment should take effect. For examole the two men recommended were 
located on August 23 and 24- with appointments to take effect 
September 1, 194S. This made it impossible to bring the Trustees 



AMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

together for action and so after checking with the Chairman of 
the Board, the President made one year appointments pending 
approval of the Trustees and with the understanding that if the 
Trustees disapproved, appointments could be terminated at the end 
of the year. After discussing the qualifications of each man, the 
Committee 



VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve appointment of Earl Floyd Cox to 
the position of Research Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering effective 
September 1, 194-3 and to approve appoint- 
ment of Carl S. Roys as Professor of 
Electrical Engineering effective 
September 1, 194-3. 

On recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following sabbatical leaves. 

1. H. Leland Varley, Assistant Professor of 
English, for one year at half pay beginning 
September 1, 19-49 to study toward the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree at the University of 
Wisconsin. 

2. Adrian H. Lindsey, Head of Department of 
Agricultural Economics for six months with 
pay beginning February 1, 1949 to study 
statistics at the Giannini Foundation for 
Agricultural Economics and to study modern 
developments in Economic Theory and 
Marketing. 

3. James Robertson, -Jr., Assistant Professor 
of Landscape Architecture, for one year at 
half pay beginning September i, 1949 to 
study toward the Master's degree in 
Architecture at Carnegie Institute of 
Technology. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 






Earl F. Cox, 
Professor (re- 
search) of 
Agric. Engin. 

Carl S. Roys 
Professor of 
Elec. Engin. 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 

Varley, H. Leland 



Adrian H. 
Lindsey 



James 
Robertson, Jr. 



1536 



Tena 
Bishop 



COMMITTEE 



Educational 

Policies 

Council 



Policy on Out- 
side Service 
for Faculty- 
Members 



Policy on 

Sabbatical 

Leaves 



College of 
Arts and 
Science 



Dean of 
College of 
Arts and 
Science 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To change sabbatical leave previously 
granted to Miss Tena Bishop, Assistant 
State 4--H Club Leader, from one year 
with half pay beginning September 1, 
194-8 to six months with full pay be- 
ginning September 1, 194-8. 

It has been necessary to recall Miss Bishop from her 
leave because of the illness of Miss Marion Forbes her co-worker. 

President Van Meter said that the Educational Policies 
Council of the University which is made up of deans of the several 
schools, certain administrative officers, and elected representa- 
tives from the faculty has been meeting weekly to act on educa- 
tional policies of the University. This group, of which the Presi- 
dent is Chairman, has recommended adoption of a policy on 
sabbatical leaves and a policy on outside service for faculty 



members . 



The Committee studied the two policies recommended and 



VOTED : To approve the attached statements. 

President Van Meter said that he expects to recommend to 
the Full Board combination of the present separate Schools of 
Liberal Arts and Science into a College of Arts and Science unaer 
one dean. If this is approved by the Board, it will be difficult 
to bring in a good experienced man to head the combination at the 
present minimum salary for a school dean of $6,000. The President 
said that school deans now receive 1300 more than department 
heads and $600 more than professors. He felt that this differential 
is too small in view of the responsibility of the position. The 
Committee discussed two possibilities whereby a dean might be ob- 
tained, (l) To get permission to hire above the minimum and 
(2) To increase the salaries of school deans and other 



1537 



IM1TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



administrative officers whose salaries are at or above this level. 
The Committee urged that President Van Meter bring a recommendation 
to the Full Board for salary increases for the deans and ad- 
ministrative officers at or above the dean level including the 



President. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4.:00 P.M. 




ecretary 



1538 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Undergradua te C ourses 

Psychology 75 (I). STATISTICS IK PSYCHOLOGY - The application of 
statistical "procedures to the analysis of psychological 
data and to problems of measurement in Psychology and re- 
lated fields. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26 and Mathematics? . Credit , 3<> 

with the proviso that the following be stipulated as 
prerequisites? 

Mathematics 62 or Agricultural Education 79 « 

Psychology 63 (I) . PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY - A study of the rela- 
tionships between the individual's behavior and his 
physiological processes. Emphasis will be placed on 
sensory, and .motor phenomena, drives, emotional . behavior, 
and learning. 

3 class hours. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26 and Physiology 32. Credit, 3« 

French 3 (I)> 4- (II) • Intenne; idate French - Primarily a reading 
course vith stress on both exact translation and rapid 
reeding for comprehension. Grammar review and oral 
practice. Pecoramended as a terminal course for those who 
are primarily interested in the ability to read French. 
Open to graduate students without credit. 
U class hours. 

Prerequisites, French 1 and 2, or 2 years of high school. 
French. Credit, 3 hours each semester.- 

French 75 (l)j (II). Cours de Style - A study of syntax and idioms 

at an advanced level. The student is taught how to express 

himself clearly and logically in living French. Credit, 3 hours* 

French 81 (I), The Modern Kovel. Credit, 3 hours* 

French 32 (II). Advanced Grammar and Composition - Phonetics. 

Pecommended for majors who intend to teach French. Credit , 3 hour 

French 91 (I), 92 (II). Seminar - The content of this course will 

vary from year to year. Open only to seniors and graduate 
^students. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Italian 51 (I), 52 (II) „ An introductory course for those who have 

had no previous Italian or whose preparation is insufficient 

for more advanced work. Training in grammar, composition, 

pronunciation, with special emphasis on reading. 

1+ class hours. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Italian 75 (I), 76 (II). Primarily a reading course with considerable 
attention to review of grammar. 
U class hours. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 



Spanish 55 (I)> 56 (II). Intensive oral practice, vocabulary study, 
grammar essenti >eech« 

Prerequisites, Spax , and 8 or equivalent, 

class hours. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Public Health 66 (I), (II). Principles of Sanitation - The applica- 
tion of sanitary engineering and related sanitary sciences 
health problems in the environment in urban and rural 

communities. 

class hours. Credit, 2, 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 77 or permission of the 
tor. 

Bacteriolo,, (I) ? (It). Water and Sewage Bacteriology - Elementary 
bacteriology with emphasis placed upon the importance of 
bacteria found in water and sewage • Work will include 
routine analyses used in the examination of water and sewage 
and in the laboratory control of water and sewage treatment 
plants. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. ' Credit, 3, 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 77 or permission of -the 
instructor. 

Zoology 35 (I), (II). Vertebrate Physiology - An introductory course 
which will include consideration of circulation, respiration, 
digestion, metabolism, excretion, chemical and nervous 
coordination, muscular activity, and reproduction. The 
laboratory work will acquaint the student with some of the 
equipment and methods used in physiological studies, with 
emphasis on the experimental approach to the labors tory 
exercises. 
2 class hours; Credit, 3< 

1 3-hour laboratory period. 

Zoology 83 (I). Comparative Physiology - A course designed to 

familiarize students with physiological principles and 
adaptations to the environment of animals throughout the 
invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. In the laboratory the 
experimental method will be developed involving general 
procedures and individual problems. 

2 class hours; 2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4-. 
Prerequisites* Zoology 1, Zoology 35 « 

Zoology 84 (II) . General Cellular Physiology - Lectures and 

laboratory covering properties and processes common to 
all organisms, including protoplasmic organization, perme- 
ability, metabolism, movement, bioelectricity, and repro- 
duction. 

2 class hours; 2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, U* 

Prerequisites, one year biology; organic chemistry. 

Zoology 87 (I). Endocrinology - ©aphasia will be directed toward the 
importance of the endocrine s in their control over normal 

functions (growth, metabolism* reproduction, etc.) in a 
variety of animals. Laboratory work will consist of demon- 
strations and individual problems . 
2 clsss hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3* 



Industrial Engineering. 25 (I) . Production Processes ~ A study of 
the manufacturing processes in use in industry and the 
principles and methods applied. Demonstrations through 
the use of field trips and motion pictures are used. 

1 class hourj 1 2-hour laboratory. 

Industrial Engineering 75 (I). Job Evaluation - A study of the 

principles used to determine an evaluation of all occu- 
pations in order to establish an equitable rating between 
them,' to establish sound wage and salary policies. 

2 class hours. 
Prerequisite, I.E. 51 • 

Industrial Engineering 77 (l). Production Control - A study of the 
principles used to regulate production activities in keep- 
ing with the manufacturing plan, 

3 class hours. 
Prerequisite, I.E. 51 • 

Industrial Engineering 78 (II). Factory Planning and Layout - A 

study of the principles applying to the determination and 
development of the physical relationship between plant* 
equipment, ana operators working tovard the highest degree 
of economy and effectiveness in operation. 
1 class hour; 1 3-hour laboratory. 
Prerecuisite, M.E. 2, I.E. 51. 

Industrial Engineering 80 (II). Plant Budgetary Control - A study 
of the principles used to pre-determine expenses for the 
factors of production and the comparison of results with 
the estimates to determine and deal with the causes of ex- 
pense variations as applied by the operating organization 
in the industrial plant. 
3 class hours. 
Prerequisite, I.E. 51. 

Industrial Engineering 82 (II) . Vork Simplification - A study of 

the principles involved in the simplification of means of 

doing vork and in the application and use of these 

principles. 

1 class hour; 1 3-hour laboratory. 

Prerequisite, M.E. 68, I.E. 76 concurrently. 

Industrial Engineering 92 (II). Professional Seminar - For seniors 

only. Presentation of papers on various important subjects 
in the field of industrial engineering, vith principal 
emphasis on recent developments. 

Food Technology S5 (I) 86 (II) . Technology of Marine Products - A 
survey of marine products of commerce and industry. 
Canning, curing and freezing of seafoods. Chemical and 
microbiological aspects of the industry. By-products, 
industrial problems and scientific literature. Emphasis 

is placed on the New England fisheries. 
1 61ass hour; 1-2 hour laboratory 



Credit, 2. 



Credit, 2, 



Credit, 3« 



Credit, 2, 



Credit, 3- 



Credit. 2. 



Credit, 3,, 



Credit, 2, 






94, - Advanced Calculus :ontinuation of Mathematics 
91. Line and sur:: als, ^.ylor's expan- 
Fourier's series, Beta 

functions. 

3 class hours Credit, 3« 

Prere te, Mathematics 91 • 



GfoJKlAlE COURSES 

Courses for Major or Minor Credits 

Bacteriology - 

193. - — Lectures on the medical significance and in- 

terpret . of clinic boratory procedures. Subjects included 
ares bacteriology,, histology, parasitology and serology. 

Credit, 6. 

194.o Msdical Technology.— Continuation of course 193 • Subjects in- 
cluded ares clinical chemistry, hematology, basal metabolism, 
laboratory records and laboratory administration. Ve'eidy 
seminars are included. Credit, 6. 

195 • Medical Technology. — Laboratory application of clinical proce- 
dures in a hospital certified by the American Medical Associa- 
tion for the instruction of Medical Technologists. Subjects in- 
cluded are: bacteriology, histology, parasitology and serology. 

Credit, A. 

196, Medical Technology. — Continuation of course 195. Subjects in- 
cluded ares clinical chemistry, hematology and basal metabolism. 

Credit, 4« 

Botany - 

113. Forest Pathology. — A lecture course dealing vith the more common 
and important fungus diseases and physiological troubles, and 
with wood decay caused by saprophytic fungi which affect forest 
trees and forest practice. Credit, 2. 

11A. Insect Transmission of Plant Diseases. — A course of stuay in the 
fundamental role played by insects in the inception, dissemina- 
tion, and epiphytotic development of plant disease. Credit, 2. 

130. Problems in Botany. — Individual assignments in morphology, 

taxonomy, physiology or pathology. Credit, k-\ each semester. 

Chemistry- 

130. 132. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Lectures. These courses will 

include each year special topics such as stereochemistry, resonance, 
free radical reactions, reaction meciianisns, molecular rearrange-* 
ments, etc. Emphasis wii.1 be given to recent developments and con- 
tributions. Given in alternate years . Credit, 3» 

139. Chemistry of Natural products. — The lectures and collateral read- 
ings will deal with the chemistry of some classes of natural com- 
pounds which are of biochemical and economic interest. Proteins, 
the sugars, starch, cellulose, polyuronides, iignin, ^lucosides, 
alkaloids, enzymes, purines, pyrimidines, and pigments wii.1 be 
considered. 

Credit, 2. 






. 








• 




















■ 


. 


' 














- 

"ices 
■U Th Lve a stu ;i n, trail- . 

urai 
products. Tl king: .of lantern elides, eha. .splays,. 

riving o; ■ biems w. arranged 

,1 needs. Credit, 5 

culture - 

of scientific literature relating to 
I practices, including various phi. gee of green- 
house raanagement, soils, fertilizers, plant propagation, 
NDwth regulators, insect pest and disease control, and 
other pertinent subjects • Credit, 1-2 each sexueste 

ology - 
1S6* FiJ .^s Tecirinology.— Marine products; of commerce 
Processed seafoods.* Cannin fo , curin&, freezing and refrigera- 
tion* Spoilage problems* By-products. Che.aical and 

:.crobioiofcical aspects. Scientific literature. Industrial 
problem Credit, * 

emc 

105 , 10o» Introduction to Modem Algebro..-- Funda:, . oncepts 
of modern al.- . Postulate systems in. general and, in 
particular, such structures as groups, rings, fields, and 
vector spaces. Credit, 3 



110. Differential Geometry. — -The application of calculus to the 

study of curves and surfaces in three dimensional space. Credit, 



Mathematics (continued) 

,6c Functi & Complex Variable. — An introduction to 
ie theory of functions of a complex variable. The course 
11 discuss such topics as derivatives, the Cauchy-Riemann 
nations 5 conformal mapping, the elementary functions, the 
Cauchy integral theorem and formula, singularities, power 
series, and Rieman surfaces. Credit, 3» 

125 p Theory of Functions of a Real Variable.— The real nunibei 

3tem, limits, it sets, continuous functions, derivatives 
of one and .more real variables. Credit, 3c 

130, Theory of Numbers . —The positive integers, primes, totients, 

congruences, Diophantine analysis. Credit, 3» 

151» Modern Synthetic Geometry.— .an extension of the geometry of 
the triangle and the circle. The course is intended 
especially for high school teachers, Credit, 3. 

165. Theory of Equations. — An introduction to advanced algebra. 

discussion of the conditions for and methods of solving 
Algebraic and transcendental equations 3 ruler and compass 
construction; systems of equations; determinants and matrices; 
symmetric functions; resultants; discriminants; invariants; 
the fundamental theorem of algebra,. Credit, 3. 

166. Introduction to Higher Geometry.—/; study of various methods 
employed in the modern treatment of geometry of points, lines, 
and conies. Such topics as homogeneous point and line 
coordinates; infinite elements; harmonic division; groups of 
transformations and their invariants; and the elements of 
projective and other geometries will 'be considered. Credit, 3« 

3 71. Vector Analysis.— The algebra and calculus of vectors. Appli- 
cations to physics and other fields will be considered. Credit, 3- 

194. Advanced Ct lculus . — Line and surface integrals, Taylor's ex- 
pansion, Fourier's series, calculus of variations, Gamma end 
Beta Functions. Credit, 3. 

200. 'Thesis. Credit > 10 ' 

Zoology and physiology- . . . 

102. Problems in Invertebrate Zoology.— Invertebrate fauna of local 
ponds, streams and bogs. Morphology, habits, life cycles and 
classification of fresh-water protozoans, sponges, flatworms, 
bryozoana and crustaceans, with a survey of the important 
literature on each 6 roup. Several field trips. Credit, 3. 

103- Animal Parasitology.— Important protozoan and helminthic 

parasites of man and domestic animals. Emphasis is placed upon 
morphology, physiological activities, classification and 



.OK.Y and Physio. 
10 phyioae d .nodes of 

tions] id other fundamental 
principle;- ->-sitism ae y of lii Credit, 3. 

' re- 
pre re animals sprepai n of parasites and parasitized 
organs f sifici fe cycles of 

parasites ~nd e , Semin ports on re- 

Creait, 3. 

\ Fisher: reeh- 

Lesj the physic; ,ical .tions of the 

environ Lons. Credit, 3 



^ « 



5. Gene: :>logy« orphoio^ical 

feai thel . i. Lectures, 

Lasmic 
structure Lnciusio: i nuc ;aena. Credit , 3. 

:dal Cytology, —A specie . ."_ems in 

cytology sue: , cytogenetics, 

and the application of physipal and chemical methods to the 
study of cytaphysiology. Credit, 3» 

L4I0 Comparative Physiology*; — a course designed to familiarize stu~ 
dents with physiological principles and adaptations to the en- 
viroment of animals throughout the invertebrate and vertebrate 
phyla. In the ^Laboratory the experimental method will be de- 
veloped involving general procedures, and individual problems. Credit, 4* 

14.2* Creneral Cellular Physioloajv — Lectures and laboratory covering 
properties and processes common to ail organisms, including 
protoplasmic organization, permeability, metabolish, movement, 
bioelectrieity, end reproduction. Credit, 4« 

3-43. Endocrinology.— -Emphasis will be directed toward the importance 
of the endoerines in their control over normal functions 
(growth, metabolism, reproduction, etc.) in a variety of 
animals. Laboratory work will consist of demonstrations and 
individual problems. Credit 3, 

145 • .advanced Vertebrate Physiology. — An opportunity for the student 

to tain experience in small aniwaj. surgery and in making, standard 
experimental preparations. Suitable technicu.es for recording re- 
sults will be employed, did the proper interpretation of the 
acquired data will be stressed. Credit, 3. 

155. Seminar. Credit, 1. 



' 






■ 



- . 
■ 






:. to accept outside service of a c 

. -:<m to \ 

Lty she jcept c >lo#ment which woix i 

ether capacity, int Let with 

y or 

:ce it is under 
;ate, without 

. 

bility for private professio. 

does wo: 
Loy him 

c pre . : 

■ 



rice shall ' he Head of his 
Dej :nt of the nature and extent of such activities. In the case of a 
De \8 Head of a Division shall 

infc University facilities ox- ecu rt are required for "private 

s Head of the Department or the Dean of 
:d« A reai . Le fee shall be paid to the 

ill Vo determined by 

m lation 

the Head for the 

iateme L tended to ay 

teaching facult \e 
•erink -< Servic 



. 



is a 

by the 1 
to c 

it to i- 

. . 

ff members 
ant y een in con- 

..•r at ars« Th r sabbe 

:han c in- seven years . 

i to one ' year with full salary or a 
full year at one-half ry. 

Ho leave with pay shall be granted for salaried employment . however desj ble 

e experience. This does not preclude a< ance of scholarships, fellow- 
ships, "or other financial aid while the ir iu&l is engaged in stud; 

5. Any member of the staff wishing to avail himself of sabb 1 leave 
file his statement of intention with the head of his department at least 
six months before the Issve is to take effect. If approved by him and the 
Dean of his School, it is then presented to the President for his approval 
and action by the Board of Trustees. A member of the Extension or Experiment 
Station staff should file his request wi- ie head of his department, wh 

if he approves, will present it through the Director' of his Division to the 
President who will place it before the Trustees with his recommendation. 
Members of the Administrative Group make their applications directly to the 
President, 

6. In order that the leave may be of benefit to the University as well as to 
the individual's personal advancement., the recipient of such a grant must 

>r til least one full year of service immediately aft©] 
expi on of hit e, Failure to comply, obligates the recipient to re- 
turn jave-ai; ce money. In the matter of extenuating circum- 
stances, this repayment may be modified or cancelled by the Board of 
Trustees. 



December 21, 1948 



-i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Minutes of [Meeting of Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds 

January 12, 1949, 11:15 A.M., Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Hubbard, Deely, 

President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke, Mr. Brehm 

Since a quorum was not present, it was decided to make 
all decisions as called for under the order of business in the form 
of recommendations to the Board of Trustees at its meeting on 
January 19. 

Mr. David D. Barnes, Architect for the new building at 
the waltham Field Station presented his plans for this building. 
Following inspection of the plans and discussion of the general 
specifications, the plans and specifications were approved subject 
to such minor changes as may finally be recommended by the Univer- 
sity officers concerned. 

Mr. W. Cornell Appleton presented plans for the con- 
struction of the Electrical Engineering wing of the main Engineer- 
ing Building. Following inspection of the plans and consideration 
of the general specifications, these plans and specifications were 
approved by the Committee. 

*■ Following lunch, the Committe made an inspection of 
several new buildings with a view to their official acceptance. 

In company with the Architects, Alderman and Alderman of 
Holyoke, the first three cement block dormitories under Contract 
No. 1 which have been completed and in use since December 1 were 
approved for acceptance as of that date. The fourth and fifth 



Valtham Field 

Station 

Building 



Engineering 
Building - wing 



Cement Block 
Dormitories 



1540 



COMMITTEE 



Engineering 
Annex 



Mills 
Dormitory 



Faculty- 
Apartment 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

buildings under Contract No. 2 were also inspected. They are of 
similar design and practically completed. They are to be 
occupied with the beginning of the second semester on February 1. 
Their acceptance, subject to completion of all work required under 
the specifications, was approved. 

The Committee inspected the Engineering Annex in company 
with the Architect, Mr. Ross. This building is already in use and 
the Committee approved its acceptance, subject to completion of a 
few minor construction details. 

The Committee inspected Mills .Dormitory in company with 
Architect Ross. This building is nearly completed and is expected 
to be in use early in the second semester. The Committee approved 
its acceptance, subject to final completion. 

The Committee reconvened at the Office of the Treasurer. 
Trustee Hubbard left to attend a meeting of the Trustee Committee 
on Course of Study. 

The Architect, Mr. Ross, presented plans for the con- 
struction of a Faculty Apartment Building of 50 apartments under 
the self-liquidating plan of the Building Association. There was 
discussion of the advisability of proceeding with this plan in view 
of the fact that it cannot be ready for use in September 194-9 when 
the University will be faced with its peak housing load. No deci- 
sion was reached on this point but the Committee approved the plans 
as presented by the Architect. 

Mr. Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, pre- 
sented plans for the construction of the new Power Plant and these 
were approved. 



The meeting adjourned at U 




retary pio tern 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 



February 23, 1949 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



"25 P* 



A * 



The following letter from Secretary Burke to members of 
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, dated February 11, 194-9, and the resultant mail 
ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

February 11, 1949 

To: Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

President Van Meter has asked me to write to each member 
of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts and to obtain a mail ballot concerning 
a contract needed in carrying on the work of the Extension Service 

At a meeting of the six New England Extension Directors 
or their representatives on February 7, Willard A. Munson, 
Director of the Extension Service in Massachusetts, was elected 
chairman of a group to initiate and carry on a project entitled 
"A Regional New England Extension Program in Marketing Information 
to Consumers, Producers and Handlers." This will be financed 
from funds appropriated by Congress to support the Extension 
educational phases of the Research and Marketing Act of 194-6. 

In order to use the funds under this Act on a regional 
basis, the institution from which the person is elected to ad- 
minister the project is required to contract with the Federal 
Administrator of the Research and Marketing Act of 194-6 to receive 
and handle the funds. 

- On February 1 the Conference of New England Agricultural 
Commissioners voted unanimously that "The proposed New England 
Extension Program in Marketing Information to Consumers, Producers 
and Handlers, and the proposed arrangements for coordinating this 
plan with the New England Radio News Service is acceptable to the 
New England Commissioners of Agriculture." 

So that you will have complete information on the purpose 
and details of the contract, I am enclosing copy of a project cut- 
lining how the program will be carried on in the New England 
states and copy of the contract itself. 



Research & 
Marketing act 



New England 

Extension 

Program 



154^ 






COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Would you please return this copy of the contract with 
your mail ballot. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James V. Burke 
Secretary of the University 



Mail Ballot 



I vote to X approve contract for carrying out 
not to 



research and service work under the Research and Marketing Act of 



19^6 and to authorize the Treasurer of the University of 



Massachusetts to sign certain contract in the name of and for 



the Board of Trustees. 



Signed 



Lottie A. Leach 
Leonard Carmichael 
P. F. "Whitmore 
A. C. Brett 
Joseph V. Bartlett 




S ecretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON EXPERIMENT STATION 

September 15, 1949, 11:00 A.M., Office of the Director 

of the Experiment Station 



Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Brett, Bartlett, Mrs. ^cNamara, 
President Van Meter, also Director 
Sievers, Dr. Bradley, Dr. Sieling, 
Secretary Burke 

The Committee discussed with Director Sievers the 

broad policies affecting the operation of the Experiment Station. 

The Director outlined the kind of projects which the Station 

undertakes, the reason behind the selection of projects, the 

funds and manpower with which he works, and the general objectives 

of the Station. 




Secretary 



545 



1546 



COMMITTEE 



Shade Tree 

Disease 

Laboratory 



Foreign 
Students 



Tuition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

November 22, 1949, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Eartlett 
49 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Carmichael, Brett, 

Whitmore, Mrs. Leach, President 

Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, Secretary 

Burke 



It vas 



VOTED : To waive reading of the call and reading of 
the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter said that the Legislature has passed 

a bill directing the Trustees to establish a Shade Tree Disease 

Laboratory at the Waltham Field Station. No provision was made 

in the bill for financing the operation. He recommended that the 

Trustees authorize the Administration to amend the University 

budget by adding $10,000 to provide for the operation of the 



Laboratory. 
VOTED: 



After discussion, it was 

To authorize the Admini strati on to request 
an addition of $10,000 to the University 
Budget for the year beginning July 1, 1950 
for personnel, supplies and other necessities 
for the operation of a Shade Tree Disease 
Laboratory at Waltham. 



President Van Meter said that the University has had 
several requests for the admission of students from foreign 
countries. The State Department is encouraging exchange of stu- 
dents between countries and he feels that it would be desirable to 
have a few foreign students on the campus. 

The Trustees discussed the desirability of encouraging 
a few well-chosen foreign students to attend the University and 



it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the President to waive tuition 
fees for not more than five foreign students 
per year as an encouragement for outstanding 
foreign students to attend the University of 
Massachusetts because of the advantages to 
Massachusetts students of associating with 
selected representatives from other civiliza- 
tions. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To authorize payment from Student Trust Funds 
of annual extra compensation in the amount of 
$75^00 to Sidney Kaplan for extra service as 
coach for the "Quarterly". 



Treasurer Hawley reported that five bids have been re- 
ceived for the re-roofing of Draper Kail. The lov bid was made by 
Columbia Cornice Company in the amount of $7530. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tracts in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees with the Columbia Cornice Company 
for repairs to Draper Hall roof at a cost 
of $7530. 

Trustee Brett outlined several proposals for construction 

of facilities at the University by the Alumni Building Corporation. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Alumni Building Corporation to 
file a bill with the -legislature providing for 
the construction of two additional dormitories 
at the University of Massachusetts - one for 
men students and one for women students - at 
a cost not to exceed $300,000. 

^ Mr. Brett said that he had learned that the University of 

Oklahoma has recently sold bonds for the construction of a Student 

Union Building on a self-liquidating basis. He said that the Alumni 

Building Corporation would be willing to explore the possibility of 

constructing such a building at the University of Massachusetts. 

There was discussion as to cost of such building and the means by 



1547 



Academics 

Activities 

Coaches 

Extra 
Compensation 



Draoer 
Hall 



Alumni 

Building 

Corooration 



Dormitories 



Student 

Union 

Building 



1548 



COMMITTEE 



University 
Apartments 



Faculty- 
Apartment 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



which the cost could be liquidated, ft was agreed that the plan 
was worth exploring further but that more facts were needed before 
a decision could be reached. 

Mr. Brett felt that such a building might well be an 
Alumni Memorial for World War II and that the Associate Alumni 
might be willing to contribute funds which they have raised for a 
memorial toward the cost of the Student Union Building. The Alumni 
have raised approximately $125,000 and it does not appear likely now 
that they will raise much more. This amount is too small for them 
to construct a separate memorial building. 

Treasurer Hawley said that the Faculty Apartment Building 
being erected by the Alumni Building Corporation will be ready abou 
June 1, 1950. He has had a considerable number of inquiries from 
faculty members as to apartments but he cannot arrive at definite 
commitments until rent schedules are fixed definitely. The build- 
ing includes a total of 50 apartments divided as follows: 
11 with combination living-bedroom; 12 with 1 bedroom; 24- with 2 
bedrooms, and 3 with 3 bedrooms. Annual operating and amortizing 
costs for the building as a whole will be approximately $4-3,000. 
Allowance needs to be made for possible vacancies from time to 
time. After discussion, the Trustees 

VOTED: To authorize the Administration to fix rents 

for apartments in the Faculty Apartment Build- 
ing at rates totaling at least $4-7,500 per 
year. 



1549 



IMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



These rentals include heat, hot vater, janitor service, 
refrigerator and stove. Tenants will pay their own electric 
bills. Leases will be on a 12-month basis, renewable from year 
to year with August 31 as the expiration date to avoid vacancies 
in the summer. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:4.0 P.M. 




ecrexary 



1550 



COMMITTEE 



Bonds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



November 25, 1949 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated November 10, 19 49 from 
Treasurer Kawley to the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees 
and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part of the 



official records of the Board. 



November 10, 1949 



To: Finance Committee 
Board of Trustees 



Due to the payment at maturity of bonds of the Central 
Pacific Failroad which we held and to a small amount of margins 
on past transactions, we ••..have at the Springfield Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company an uninvested principal of §5*204.. 75« 1 have 
discussed with Mr. Haigis, Chairman of the Committee, the matter 
of the reinvestment of this sum. Vie have an application for a 
first mortgage real estate loan from a University Sorority. 

It is our opinion that before making a long-term invest- 
ment, the Committee should have an opportunity to consider our 
whole investment program. Accordingly, it is my recommendation, 
which has the approval of the Chairman, that the uninvested 
principal, indicated above, be deposited in the Amherst Savings 
Bank at 2\ percent interest, pending decision of the Committee 
as to future investment. 

In order to make this transfer, I need to present to 
our fiscal agent, the Springfield Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 
a vote of the Committee authorizing the change. Accordingly, I 
enclose herewith a ballot form and returned envelope for your use. 
Your consideration is appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



1551 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAIL BALLOT 



MITTEE 



In accordance with the recommendation of the Treasurer 
in his letter of November 10, 194-9> I hereby vote: to authorize 
the withdrawal of $5,204.75 uninvested principal from the 
Springfield Safe Deposit and Trust Company for reinvestment by 
the Treasurer. It is understood that this amount will be 
temporarily deposited in the Amherst Savings Bank at 2\% interest. 



Yes. 

No 



Signed: 



J. W. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Philip F. "Whitmore 
Ralph F. Taber 



John ¥. Haigis 
William M. Gashin 
F.. A. Van Meter 




_Secretary 






1552 



COMMITTEE 



Veterans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOAED OF TFUSTEES 

December 20, 1949, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
4.9 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT; 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 

Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Carmichael, 
Vhitmore, Mrs. Leach, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley said that the Veterans Administration 
now requires contract covering education of veterans under the 
provisions of Public Law 34.6. Previously the Veterans Administra- 
tion required contracts only for veterans studying under Public 
Law 16. Pending agreement upon terms of this contract, the 
Veterans Administration has offered a preliminary contract for one 
year which provides for a payment by the Veterans Administration 
up to 75$ of the amount claimed by the University with the remain- 
ing amount to be paid upon execution of final contract. 

Pending the signing of this contract, the Veterans Ad- 
ministration has made no payment for tuition, fees, text books and 
other supplies furnished by the University. After discussion, it 



wa: 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign pre- 
liminary contract dated September 19, 1949 
with the Veterans Administration in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To promote Mrs. K. May Larson from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Home Economics Ex- 
tension effective January 1, 1950 at annual 
salary of $5760. This promotion is to the 
vacancy left by the retirement of Mrs. Harriet 
J. Haynes. 

The Trustees invited Dean Helen S. Mitchell and Miss 
Alice Jane of the School of Home Economics into the meeting to 
discuss a proposal that Crotty Brothers, concessionaires, take over 
the operation of boarding halls at the University. 

Treasurer Hawley said he had been requested by 
Commissioner Thomas H. Buckley to attend a meeting of the 
Commission on Administration and Finance recently to discuss the 
possibility of having Crotty Brothers operate the University board- 
ing halls. Mr. Crotty was present at the meeting of the ComTiission|. 
Mr. Hawley received the impression that the Commission was favor- 
able to Mr. Crotty' s proposal and that they would like to have him 
take over operation of the boarding halls at an early date possibly 
by February 1 - the beginning of the second semester. As a result 
of the meeting, Chairman Buckley has asked that the Trustees con- 
sider Mr. Crotty' s proposal. 

Chairman Bartlett said that apparently tvvo questions are 
involved. (1) Should the University turn its boarding hall opera- 
tions over to a concessionaire and (2) If so, under what conditions 

The Crotty Brothers proposal appears to include the ex- 
clusive privilege of selling all food stuff on campus and also all 
tobacco and beverages. This would include operation of the Uni- 
versity Store and the vending machines in the dormitories as well 



155 



3 



Larson, Mrs. N. 
May 



Crotty Brothers 



Dining Hall 



1554 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as operation of the three boarding units. Heat, light, fuel, 
equipment and maintenance of buildings and grounds would be 
supplied by the University. Treasurer Havley indicated that these 
items cost annually about *13,/+00. Crotty Brothers propose to pay 
to the University 3>% of their gross sales or approximately 310,000 
annually. No guarantee is made as to prices to be charged to stu- 
dents. Books of tickets would be sold to students at a cost of 
$36.50 per book - each book being good for 30 days. A student can 
use the book to pay for meals with each dish being priced 
separately. He can also use the book for the purchase of tobacco, 
soft drinks, snacks or other items sold by the concessionaire. 
Under this plan the student is not required to eat any fixed 
number of meals at the Boarding Hall. After the $36-50 is used up, 
the student may pay cash for additional meals or purchase a $10.00 
coupon book good at all times or until he purchases another 30-day 



book. 



The original proposal had been for the University to sell 



the books and see that students purchased them. The Treasurer 
objected to this plan and apparently the Comptroller of the 
Commonwealth has agreed with him that the concessionaire should 
handle sales of tickets and collection of money. 

In reply to question the Treasurer said that the Uni- 
versity now requires all freshman students and all dormitory resi- 
dents except seniors and except members of fraternities which 
operate boarding halls to eat at the University boarding hall. 
About 14.00 students are eating there regularly at the present time. 
About 100 students are employed part time at the Boarding Hall. 



fiB* +B» amir 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was discussion as to whether it would be possible 
to continue instruction at the University in Institution Managemen 
and Hotel Stewarding if the boarding halls are operated by a con- 
cessionaire. At the present time the School of Home Economics 
teaches quantity cooking and institutional management, using the 
boarding hall at Butterfield as a working laboratory. The stu- 
dents are trained in menu planning, meal preparation, and food 
service. Dean Mitchell said that she questioned very seriously 
whether this could be coordinated with operation of the boarding 
halls by a concessionaire. 

The students actually take over the operation three 
times a week relieving the regular employees. The boarding hall a 
Butterfield is also under the supervision of the School of Home 
Economics in its entire operation as well as during the time when j:he 
students are preparing the meals. 

She said she did not know of any college or university 
which teaches institutional management and which has a concessionaire 
operate its boarding halls. She felt that the very fact that a 
concessionaire was operating the boarding halls as against a Home 
Economics School would lower the prestige of the school and under- 
mine accreditation of the instructional program. 

Mr. Andrew Crotty and Mr. Joseph M. Gately were invited 
into the meeting to discuss their proposal. They stated that the 
form of contract submitted by them to Dr. Bartlett was sub- 
stantially that now in operation at William and Mary College. 
They said that the students at William and Mary are not required 
to eat at the concession but that 30-day tickets are sold to those 



1556 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



who do eat there. This provision enables students to eat elsewhere 
now and then to avoid complaints on paying for meals seven days a 
week when all meals are not actually eaten. 

The Trustees asked Mr. Crotty how the student or his 
parents could know in advance the cost of board for a year under 
this system. They pointed out that the University has always 
published a statement in its catalogue indicating the cost of 
board. The University now provides 15 meals a week at &S.75 and 
provides week-end service on a cash basis to those who wish to 
eat there. Mr. Crotty said that his organization is willing to 
operate in any manner that would prove most satisfactory to the 
University. He said that they could readily change the 30-day 
ticket policy to a fixed charge basis so that students can know 
in advance the cost of eating for a semester or for a year. 

The Trustees also asked how much student help would be 
used if the operation were on a concessionaire basis. Mr. Crotty 
said that they endeavor to use student help in every way possible. 
At William and Mary they are using 2U students approximately 
6 hours a day. 

There was discussion as to continued employment of full 
time workers now at the Boarding Hall. Mr. Crotty said it is 
their policy to retain the efficient workers and to release those 
who do not prove satisfactory. Question was raised as to the per- 
centage of gross sales paid to other colleges where Crotty Brothers 
have concessions. Three percent is paid at William and Mary and 
5% at Stetson. Mr. Crotty said that it is possible that they could 
pay 5% at the University if they were favored with the contract. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He also agreed that it -would not be necessary for them to take over 
all vending machines especially in view of the fact that the only 
vending machines in dormitories are for soft drinks and the profit 
from these machines is used by the dormitory residents to buy 
recreational equipment or to establish scholarship funds. He indi- 
cated that he referred to the soft drink machines now in the dormi- 
tories but that he would not favor expansion of vending machines to 
handle other sales. Treasurer Hawley said that the University also 
is against additional vending machines as the Administration does 
not want miscellaneous food service in the dormitories. 

It was the concensus that many details still have to be 
worked out, especially the problem of the University's instruction 
program in Foods Management. It was felt that it would be unwise 
to rush through a decision until further study can be made. The 
Trustees requested Dean Mitchell to obtain more information from 
other colleges and universities as to how they handle their food 
service. 

Chairman Bartlett said that he would not be present at 
the annual meeting of the Board and he was therefore appointing 
today a committee to nominate officers and committee members for 
the coming year. This committee is composed of Trustees Deely, 
Chairman; Trustees Hubbard and Mrs. Leach. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 P.M. 



1557 




ecretary 



1558 



COMMITTEE 



Fees - 



Control Laws 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON TUITION AND FEES 
January U, 1950, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst, Mass. 

Trustee Hubbard presiding 

PRESENT.: Trustees Hubbard, Taber, Brown, 

Whitmore, Deely, President Van Meter, 
Dean Machmer, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke, Registrar Lanphear 

The Committee first considered non-student fees charged 
by the University for various services, particularly services 
rendered by the "control" laboratories. 

Treasurer Hawley presented a tabulation of the fees 
charged for (1) feed, fertilizer and dairy glassware inspection 
(2) seed inspection (3) inspection for poultry and animal diseases 
and (A) dairy cattle certification. His tabulation showed the fees 
charged by tne University of Massachusetts as compared with the 
fees charged by the other New England Land-Grant Colleges. Feed, 
fertilizer and dairy glassware testing is done at no cost to the 
State inasmuch as income equals appropriations. Dairy cattle certi- 
fication is also self-supporting. However, the seed control 
laboratory spends approximately $15,000 against an income of appro xi 
mately $2,100. Some of the seed tests which they make are required 
by law and no fee is charged. Certain tests are made on voluntary 
basis for which fee is charged. 

Poultry and animal disease testing produces a revenue 
that equals about 57% of cost. Most of this service is testing for 
poultry pullorum disease which is done at 5 cents per bird. 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Only Maine charges more than Massachusetts, with a fee of 6 cents 
per bird. Connecticut charges 2 cents. Massachusetts poultrymen 
apparently are strongly against any increase in the fee, as an 
increase in any of their costs would put them at a disadvantage in 
a highly competitive industry. The law establishing this service 
provides that the University may charge a fee up to 10 cents per 



bird. 



In connection with the discussion, it was brought out 



that the University performs a great many services free of charge 
for other state institutions. The Trustees felt that a tabulation 



should be made of all these various services which should be brought 
to the attention of the Ways and Means Committee, the Commission 
on Administration and Finance, and the Governor. 

The Trustees requested Treasurer Hawley also to prepare 
figures showing how much it costs the University to make each of the 
various kinds of tests mentioned above and to report this informa- 



tion to the Trustees at a later date. 

There was discussion of the fee which should be charged 

to parents who send children to the University Nursery School 

operated by the School of Home Economics and it was 

VOTED: To increase the fee from the present $10.00 

per semester to $25.00 per semester effective 
September 1, 1950. 

Dr. Hubbard voted against this proposal. 

The Committee then considered student tuition and fees. 
President Van Meter said that it has been the function of land- 
grant colleges to provide low cost education. The general policy 

is to keep tuition low so as to be able to provide education to 



Nursery 

School 

Fee 



Tuition 

Fees 



1560 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



those who otherwise would not be able to go to college. Recently, 
however, there has been some pressure from the State to increase 
the tuition charge so as to provide more revenue for the Common- 
wealth as an offset to the appropriations of the University. The 
President felt that tuition should be kept low, or if the Trustees 
decide to increase the tuition, provision should be made for 
scholarships to take care of needy cases. 

The Trustees then considered tuition and fee charges at 
other state universities in the northeast. Massachusetts is not 
out of line as to cost to the student in a comparison with this 
group . 

Trustee Deely said that there is a serious competitive 
demand on the resources of government. This is increasing the 
cost of government and increasing the competition for the state 
dollar. It is important that the student body at the University 
should increase and not decrease. However, he felt that a tuition 
rate of |100 established in 1933 is not realistic today. The in- 



come of people has substantially advanced. He felt that Trustees 
had an obligation of increasing the amount of the tuition fee but at 
the same time of providing scholarships for needy students even to 
the extent of free tuition. However most parents can afford an 
increase in the tuition charge. He suggested that if scholarships 
are established for needy students they should be administered by 
the Scholarship Committee of the University. 

Registrar Lanphear said that of 620 freshmen admitted 
this past fall, 94- applied for scholarships but that the University 
was able to award only 29 and these were practically all in Agri- 
culture and its related sciences. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Hubbard said that in his opinion there is no 
need for a state university if tuition fees are to be comparable 

or nearly comparable with those of private colleges. If we raise 
our tuition, we get nearer to the same cost basis as these colleges 

Mr. Lanphear indicated that the student body at the 
University comes from low income families and that any increase 
in tuition would seriously affect this group unless it were offset 
by generous scholarship provisions. In answer to a question he 
said that a decrease in tuition would cause more students to apply 
for admission which would raise the quality of the student body. 
Conversely an increase in tuition would cause fewer students to 
apply and lower the quality of the student body. 

After further discussion, it was 

VOTED : To continue the present committee, to draw 
in advice from various persons and groups, 
and to prepare a recommendation to the full 
Board prior to the budget meeting of the 
Board. 

It was also 

VOTED: To hold a meeting of the committee early in 
March at the State House. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 P.M. 




7-C<f^ ^*ri S ecretary 



ool 



1562 



COMMITTEE 



Endovment 
Funds 



Securities of 
the College 



Checks, cashing 
of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE OK FINANCE 
January 4., 1950, 2:00 P.M., President's Office, Amherst, Mass. 

Trustee Haigis presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Taber, Vhitmore, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Treasurer Hawley distributed copies of a tabulation show- 
ing all endovment investments as of November 30, 194-9. It was 

VOTED: To make no change in the endowment list 
at the present time. 

It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees con- 
firm the following transactions in securities 
during the 1949 calendar year as requested by 
the agent for endowment securities: 

Matured bond August 2, $5*000, Central 
Pacific Railroad, 4's, $5,000. 

Withdrawal November 22, 1949 for deposit 
in Savings Bank, f 5, 204.75. 

Treasurer Hawley said that the Comptroller of the Common- 
wealth has informed him that the University may no longer cash stu- 
dent checks or other personal checks with State funds. Mr. Hawley 
said that there has been no loss due to bad checks for at least ten 
years and that unless the University can cash checks for staff or 
students, it would be necessary for persons to travel one mile to 
the town of Amherst and establish credit there. He pointed out that 
cash balances are usually available in several non-state funds such 
as the Athletic Fund and the University Store Fund. It was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to use balances 
in the University Trust Funds accounts for 
cashing of checks payable to students of 
the University for amounts not to exceed 
$100 per check and for cashing State, Federal 
and University checks of the staff other than 
payroll checks. 

President Van Meter said that the Experiment Station has 
a need for additional land on which to conduct experiments. The 
University has encroached upon Experiment Station land with new 
buildings and with today's land prices it is not considered 
feasible to attempt to buy. However four acres of land are avail- 
able for rental. After discussion, it was 

VOTE D: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
rental of four acres of land on East Pleasant 
Street from A. A. Brown at a cost of $200 per 
year for five years. 

Treasurer Hawley said that the previous Assistant 

Treasurer, Mr. Broadfoot, had been voted authority by the Board of 

Trustees to sign checks and papers in the absence of the Treasurer. 

Mr. Broadfoot has retired and the present encumbent is L. Lawrence 

Taylor. Mr. Hawley felt that Mr. Taylor should also have this 



authority so that the business of the University may proceed on such 
occasions as it is necessary for the Treasurer to be absent. 

The Trustees inquired as to the size of bond covering 
Mr. Taylor. Mr. Hawley said that Mr. Taylor is covered by a 
blanket bond in the amount of $10,000. The Trustees felt that 
this bond is too low considering the amounts of cash available and 
requested that Mr. Hawley raise question with the Executive 
Committee as to the size of the bond. It was 



583 



Trust 
Funds 



Land for 

Experiment 
Station 



A. A. Brown 
land 



L. Lawrence 
Taylor 



Blanket 
Bond 



1564 



COMMITTEE 



Vouchers - 
destroying of 



Student 
Loans - can- 
cellation of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend to the Trustees that in the 
absence of the Treasurer, the Assistant 
Treasurer, L. Lawrence Taylor, be 
authorized to sign such official documents 
of the University as require the signature 
of the financial officer in charge. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize L. Lawrence Taylor, Assistant 

Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
to sign any and all checks, withdrawal orders, 
drafts, certificates of deposit, and all 
other documents required to be signed or en- 
dorsed in the name and behalf of University 
of Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of 
said University of Massachusetts in order to 
deal with, withdraw from, and deposit to any 
bank accounts of the University of Massachusetts. 

The Treasurer said that from time to time it is 
necessary to destroy old vouchers and that before doing so he re- 
ceives permission from the State Commission on Obsolete Records. 
This Commission has recently authorized him to destroy State 
vouchers to the period of the last audit but at the same time the 
Commission indicated that it had no jurisdiction over Trust Fund 
vouchers. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to destroy Trust 
Fund vouchers up to July 1, 1942. 

The Treasurer reported that as of June 30, 1949 > 34- stu- 
dent loans are outstanding in a total amount of $2, 592. 44- • Seven- 
teen of these loans are overdue. The Attorney General has 
recommended cancellation of seven of these loans which are now out- 
lawed by the statute of limitations. The seven loans total $502. 
It vas 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Treasurer to cancel the follow- 
ing seven notes: 



Name 



Date of Note 



Allan T. Fuller May 15, 1940 

Marshall Holt March 16, 1933 

Gardner C. Lombard Feb. 19, 1936 

John P. Morrison Oct. 3, 1933 

Leonard Rice Jan. 14, 1937 

Henry R. Surgen Jan. 23, 1942 

Malcolm H. Adams Feb. 12, 1934 



pate of Maturity Amount 

Sept. 15, 1940 $27.65 

May 16, 1933 75-45 

Sept. 19, 1936 141.00 

Oct. 3, 1939 32.10 

March 14, 1937 63.39 

July 23, 1942 26.95 

August 12, 1934 135.40 



There was discussion as to the feasibility of continuing 
the agreement with the Springfield Safe Deposit and Trust Company 
for its handling of endowment funds. It was felt that it would be 
easier for the Treasurer to do business with a local bank and that 
better control could be maintained over the funds. It was agreed 
that Treasurer Hawley would consult with a local bank and report 
back to the Board or to the Executive Committee after he had ob- 
tained more information. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 




i? — -~ Secretary 



565 



SDrinefield Safe 
Deposit & Trust 
Company 



Endowment Funds 



1566 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF SPECIAL TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON TUITION AND FEES 
March 8, 1950, 2:00 P.M., Room 443, State House, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Hubbard presiding 



Tuition 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Hubbard, Whitmore, Deely, 
Taber, Brown, Thomas H. Buckley, 
Chairman of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance, William 
H. Bixby, Budget Commissioner, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



TOTED: To waive reading of the call. 

The Secretary read that portion of the minutes of the 
January L, meeting pertaining to student tuition at the University. 

Trustee Deely said that practically all, if not all, 
private colleges have increased their tuition substantially in the 
past few years so that $4-50 is a minimum for most well-known 
private colleges and universities. The University of Massachusetts 
has not changed its tuition since 1933 when the present rate of 
$100 was established. He said, however, that the Trustees should 
not consider an increase in tuition without at the same time 
making provision for scholarship funds to take care of needy and 
deserving students who otherwise might be debarred from higher 
education. 

Mr. Enright, Chair-man of the Committee on Agriculture of 
the Legislature, appeared briefly but could not stay because of 
pressure of legislative business. 

Representative Brox also of Agriculture attended the 
meeting for a brief period to speak in favor of low tuition at the 
University. He said that he was in favor of keeping tuition costs 



TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

down so that students from low income families may continue to 
attend. He said that he would consider a tuition increase only as 
a last resort. Upon question from one of the Trustees, he said 
that he would not object to a tuition increase if the increased in- 
come were used to provide scholarships for needy students; other- 
wise he would not favor an increase. 

Representative Hannon also of Agriculture appeared 
briefly at the meeting to say that he hoped no action would be 
taken to bar qualified youngsters from higher education because of 
lack of funds. In answer to a question he said that he would not 
object to a tuition increase if the increased income were used for 
scholarship aid to needy students. 

Mr. Bixby spoke of State finances in general and also of 
finances of the State University. During the past few years it has 
been possible to provide increased funds to the University from 
the Veterans fund. At the same time the University was collecting 
tuition at the rate of $4-00 per year per veteran. Now with the 
number of veterans declining, tuition income has fallen off and 
also the State is able to assign less money to the University 
from the Veterans fund. Much of the cost of operation has to be 
shifted to the general fund. He said that a proposal to increase 
tuition but to use all the increase to provide scholarships would 
probably not appeal to the Legislature. 

Mr. Bixby estimated roughly that the annual net cost per 
student at the University is about £600 a year as against a tuition 
payment for civilians of $100. He said also that the Ways and 
Means Committee at the present time is exploring all possibilities 
for increasing revenue to the State. 



587 



1568 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was discussion as to whether the Trustees of the 
University have the power without further legislation to vary the 
amount of tuition charged to different students. In connection 
with this discussion, Paymond FitzGerald of the Department of Edu- 
cation stepped into the meeting briefly to cite the Lynch - Warren 
case and the Whitaker - Salem case as possibly having bearing on 
the ability of the Trustees to charge tuition or to vary the amount 
of tuition. 



Commissioner Buckley suggested the possibility of establish- 
ing State scholarships to be awarded on the basis of regional 
competitive examinations. He said that he believes this is being 
done in Pennsylvania at the present time. He suggested that the 
tuition might be increased to |200 per year and that a portion of 
the increased income could be used for establishing 500 scholar- 
ships at $200 each. Mr. Buckley also suggested the possibility of 
using more funds for employment of students to help them meet ex- 
penses. Commissioner Buckley cited Chapter Lh of the Acts of 1383 
which provided for the establishment of scholarship funds by the 
Legislature. This statute appears to be still on the books but no 
funds were ever appropriated to put it into effect. 

There was discussion of the idea of having flexible 
scholarship funds which could be apportioned according to need. 
It was also suggested that the regional scholarships might be 
available only to needy students - or scaled in amount according to 
need . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was agreed that the Secretary would "write to the 
University of Pennsylvania and also to Cornell University to learn 
more about the regional scholarship plan. 

Chairman Hubbard said that he had just received mimeo- 
graphed preliminary copy of that section of the report of the 
Recess Commission on Education dealing with the University of 
Massachusetts. He said the report was not yet in print and re- 
quested that the Secretary get copies as soon as possible and mail 
them to the Trustees. In the report the Becess Commission opposes 
an increase in tuition and also recommends the establishment of 
State scholarship funds. 

Treasurer Hawley said that he has assembled further in- Eees 

Control Law 
formation on fees charged by the University for various control 

law services. It was agreed that due to the lateness of the hour, 

Mr. Hawley would mail this information to the committee rather 

than present it orally. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4-*15 P.M. 




Secretary 



1570 



COMMITTEE 



Boarding 
Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

March 21, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
49 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Whitmore, Mrs. Leach, 
President Van Meter, Commissioner Thomas 
H. Buckley, Treasurer Hawley, Walter 
Johnson, Dr. Mitchell, Miss Jane, 
Secretary Burke 

At the request of Chairman Bartlett, Treasurer Hawley 
reviewed the history of the Boarding Hall operations. The Uni- 
versity has conducted a boarding hall for students for 47 years. 
Until September of 1938 it was operated on a revolving fund basis. 
In 1938 it was converted to operation on an appropriation basis 
upon the initiative of the State Commission on Administration & 
Finance. The Commission now questions the continued operation of 
the Boarding Hall on an appropriation basis and recommends that it 
be leased to a private concessionaire. Mr. Hawley says that he 
understands that the recommendation is based on two propositions: 
(l) That this would reduce the annual appropriation required by 
the University. (2) That present management is inefficient and 
unsatisfactory . 

Commissioner Buckley stated that the Commission on Ad- 
ministration & Finance is opposed to operation of the Boarding 
Hall on a revolving fund basis. He said that the present appro- 
priation system is better budgeting and offers better control of 
expenditures. He said that legislation would be necessary to re- 
establish the Boarding Hall on a revolving fund basis and that the 

Commission would oppose such legislation. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett said that apparently the Trustees must 
decide three questions: (1) Shall the Boarding Hall be operated by 
a concessionaire and if so, on what conditions? (2) Shall the 
management of the Boarding Hall be changed? (3) Should the Univer- 
sity go along as at present? 

Dri Mitchell said that at the request of the Executive 
Committee she had collected information by means of a questionnaire 
from 46 colleges and universities as to procedures in operation of 
their boarding halls. In 44 of the 46 universities replying, the 
boarding hall is operated by the college or university. In one 
there is a combination of university and concessionaire. The other 
reply could not be understood. 

She also inquired as to the use of student labor. 
Apparently the University of Massachusetts is about average with the 
other colleges in its use of student labor in operating the Boarding 
Hall. 

Thirty-seven institutions indicated that they taught in- 
stitution management and 33 of the 37 said that the teaching program 
was coordinated with the food service. Nine said that restaurant 
management was taught and 7 of the 9 coordinated the teaching with 
food service. 

Dr. Mitchell also asked the colleges whether they required 
students to eat at the boarding hall. Those which had discontinued 
compulsion got into financial difficulties and went back to required 
board, at least for a part of their students. 

She said that 14 colleges operate boarding halls on re- 
volving funds. Three are state subsidized, 24 are self-supporting. 



1572 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Commissioner Buckley asked Dr. Mitchell as to the rela- 
tive importance of the food teaching program as against the food 
service program at the University. Dr. Mitchell said that 22 
students in each semester are studying the hotel stewarding course 
and \U home economics students are majoring in food management. 
Commissioner Buckley asked whether Dr. Mitchell had made an effort 
to find out if a concessionaire could make allowances for the needs 
of these students. Dr. Mitchell said that she had not but had 
been advised by other colleges that such a proposal would not be 
satisfactory. Chairman Buckley asked whether other students be- 
sides the 36 in each semester are benefited by university operation 
of a boarding hall but could not benefit under a concessionaire. 
Dr. Mitchell said that a few students are used in meat cutting and 
food preparation. However, for the most part, student labor is 
used in washing dishes and in serving food at the counters. 

In reply to a question, Mr. Johnson said that the Uni- 
versity has 65 full-time employees. These are not on Civil Ser- 
vice. Their dates of initial employment vary. All are in the 
State Retirement System. He said that about 100 students are em- 
ployed part-time at the Boarding Hall. 

Commissioner Buckley asked about the present price 
charged to students. Mr. Hawley said that 5-day meal tickets are 



sold for $8.75» Students wishing to board on Saturday and Sunday 
pay cash at the rate of $1.90 a day making a total of $12.55 for 7 
days. 

Mr. Buckley said that according to his record 22,000 
meals were paid for but not eaten by students in the month of 
January 1950 but that there was a loss on each meal that was 
actually eaten. He said that meals cost 64# and were sold for 58#« 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley stated that the gross income through 
February was $303,156.37; expenditures were $274,721.76 leaving a 
gain of $28,^35.11. 

Mr. Buckley asked whether the Treasurer's figures show- 
ing net gain were on an accrual or a cash basis. In other words, 
did the apparent profit include income from the sale of tickets 
for meals not yet eaten? 

Mr. Hawley said that the above figures covered only in- 
come and expenditures applicable to the eight months, July 1, 194-9 
to February 28, 1950. They do not include income from service not 
yet rendered. 

Treasurer Hawley pointed out that last year was the only 
year that the Boarding Hall operated at a loss. He said that this 
was due for the most part to a decision by the Administration not 
to require students to eat at the Boarding Hall. 

Chairman Bartlett asked who criticized Mr. Johnson's 
management. Commissioner Buckley said that a group of stewards 
of mental hospitals had made a survey at his request in March of 
1949. Mr. Buckley then read the report of these stewards in 
which they criticized severely the operation of the Boarding Hall 
and recommended a change in management. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that he had received several 
commendations of the food service of the Boarding Hall including 
a commendation from a group of public health workers who were re- 
cently at the University for a 12-week short course. These men 
praised the food very highly and said that their only complaint 
was that they gained weight. Mr. Hawley spoke of the student mess 



'78 



1574 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

committee appointed by the Student Senate to work with the Boarding 
Hall, He said that the mess committee this year has made very 
little, if any, criticism. 

Chairman Bartlett asked Mr, Johnson what he cared to say 
about the report of the stewards. Mr. Johnson said that he dis- 
agreed with their findings and further that the report was pre- 
pared during the period when the University was not requiring stu- 
dents to eat at the Boarding Hall and the management could not plan 
on how many meals to prepare. He pointed out that the only meal 
that the stewards ate during the period of their report was eaten 
late in the serving period when choices were not available. Miss 
Jane said that food in the best restaurants is not as good at the 
end of the serving period as at the beginning. 

It was agreed to hold another meeting of the Executive 
Committee as early as possible. The Secretary was instructed to 
find a date when all members could be there. 

The meeting was adjourned at two o'clock. 




'3^!Lc&-^&--^ 



^Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass, 

March 29, 1950 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated March 14- from Treasurer 

Hawley to members of the Finance Committee of the Board of 

Trustees of the University of Massachusetts and the resultant 

mail ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the 



Board, 



March 14-, 1950 



To: Finance Committee of the 
Board of Trustees 

Gentlemen: 

The Board of Trustees at its Annual Meeting in 
January voted to authorize the Treasurer to negotiate an agree- 
ment with the First National Bank of Amherst for custody of en- 
dowment securities, said agreement to be subject to approval of 
the Finance Committee, 

Such an agreement has been prepared which is acceptable 
to the Bank and which Mr. Haigis, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, has approved. This agreement is substantially the 
same as the one now in force with the Springfield Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company. It provides, in addition, that the Bank shall 
review holdings from time to time and make suggestions to the 
Treasurer for investment or reinvestment. It requires that a 
certified copy of a vote of the Finance Committee shall be pre- 
sented as authority for the sale or purchase of securities or for 
the withdrawal of securities or funds. The compensation to the 
Agent is specified as three percent (3%) of gross income received 
which is the same rate paid under our present agreement. 

The Chairman has authorized me to request a vote of 
the Committee, by mail, and I enclose a ballot for that purpose. 
If any Trustee would like to see a copy of the full agreement be- 
fore voting, I shall be glad to send one upon request. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



1575 



SECURITIES OF 
THE COLLEGE 



FIRST 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF AMHERST 






1576 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAIL BALLOT 

In accordance vith the explanations contained in the 
Treasurer's letter of March 14-, 1950, I herefcy vote as follows 
upon the proposition of approval of the agreement vith the First 
National Bank of Amherst for custody of securities of Endowment 
Funds. 



Approved X_ 



John W. Haigis 
J. V. Bartlett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Ralph F. Taber 
William M. Cashin 
R. A. Van Meter 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 

March 30, 1950 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter from Treasurer Hawley to members 
of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, dated March 24, 1950, and the resultant 
mail ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the 



1577 



Cavalry 
Barn 



Board, 



To: Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 



March 24, 1950 



Gentlemen: 

With the approval of the Chairman, a mail vote is re- 
quested herewith on the subject of authorizing the Treasurer to 
execute a contract with Aquadro and Cerruti, Inc., of Northampton, 
in the amount of $8,481.64- for the Reconstruction of the present 
Cavalry Stable to provide storeroom and other facilities for the 
ROTC. 

The Legislature appropriated $65,000 for the Improvement 
of ROTC Facilities. Under this appropriation, we have set up, 
and the Public Building Commission has approved, three projects; 
the first of which is the Reconstruction of the present Cavalry 
Stable for storeroom facilities. The other two are the Con- 
struction of an Arms Storage Building, adjacent to the present 
Drill Hall, and the construction of a Garage, adjacent to the 
present Cavalry Stable for the hosing of armored vehicles. The 
Budget, as originally set up and approved by the Building 
Commission, is as follows: 



Cavalry Stable Reconstruction 

Arms Storage 

Garage 

Total 



$12,000 
18,000 
35.000 

$65,000 



You will note that the low bid received on the Cavalry 
Reconstruction is substantially lower than the estimate of 
$12,000. There is no question in our minds that the other facili- 
ties can be provided within the funds appropriated. 



1578 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There is considerable urgency in the case of the Recon- 
struction of the Cavalry Stable since we have no place in which 
to store clothing and equipment issued to students when this is 
returned to us at the end of the semester. Hence, we are very 
eager to get this project completed before the end of May so that 
it will be available for use at that time. That is why we are re- 
questing your early consideration of this contract. 

The award of this contract to the low bidder, Aquadro & 
Cerruti, has been approved by the Public Building Commission and 
by the Comptroller of the Commonwealth. Your early consideration 
will be greatly appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



MAIL BALLOT 

In accordance with information contained in the letter 
of the Treasurer of March 2U 9 1950, my vote is recorded below on 
the proposition that the Treasurer be authorized to execute a 
contract in the name of and for the Board of Trustees with 
Aquadro and Cerruti, Inc., of Northampton, in the amount of 
$8,4£1.64 for "the Reconstruction of the Cavalry Stable to provide 
storeroom and other facilities for the RORC. 



Approved_ 



J. W. Bartlett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Leonard Carmichael 
A. C. Brett 
Lottie A. Leach 
R. A. Van Meter 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April U, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
4.9 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Whitmore, 
Carmichael, Mrs. Leach, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

Discussion of the last two meetings of the Executive 
Committee on the subject of the University Boarding Hall was re- 
viewed. It was brought out that the Boarding Hall had operated 

1 

for many years without financial loss until last year. In that 
one year there was a loss of $74>000 due in large part to temporary 
abandonment of the requirement that certain students eat at the 
Boarding Hall. This year the Boarding Hall is again operating at 



157 



a profit. 



Treasurer Hawley said that since 1939 when the Boarding 



Hall was changed from a revolving fund operation to operation on an 

appropriation basis, there has been an income over costs of approxi 

mately $36,000, taking into account last year's losses. 

It was the conclusion of the committee that last year' s 

loss was an exception, that the students are satisfied with the 

food served at the Boarding Hall, and that finances are in satis- 

factory condition. The committee unanimously 

VOTE D: To continue operations of the Boarding Hall 
by the University on the present basis and 
to ask in the Supplementary Budget for 
sufficient appropriation to carry the Board- 
ing Hall during the coming year. 



Boarding 
Hall 



1580 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It vas agreed to provide a statement on the operation of 
the Boarding Hall to support the Supplementary Budget request. 

There was discussion as to how the Trustees might arrange 
for an independent study of the Boarding Hall to see if more 
efficient operation could be effected. The request of the Trustees 
for authorization to employ an independent investigation has been 



refused. 



The meeting was adjourned at 1 o'clock. 



— * 




r£^ 



Secretary 



*r 



1581 



Supplementary 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April 27, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
49 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Vihitmore, Mrs. Leach, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

There was discussion of the Supplementary Budget for the 
University for the year beginning July 1, 1950. In the original 
budget the Trustees requested the sum of |5, 601, 730. "While the 
budget has not yet been finally approved, the amount apparently 
has been reduced to $>4-» 54-6,4-50. The Trustees felt that in sub- 
mitting a Supplementary Budget the University should keep in mind 
the general State finances and reduce their askings in so far as 
possible. However, there are certain minimum needs which must be 
met unless important services of the University are to be discon- 
tinued. After discussion, the Trustees 

VOTED: To approve a Supplementary Budget request in 
the amount of $271,770 to meet minimum needs 
of the University. 

The Treasurer was requested to seek a hearing before the 
Ways and Means Committee so that these needs could be presented 
orally as well as in writing. 

Decision regarding a proposed 7-day board requirement for 
freshman residents of campus dormitories was postponed until the 
next meeting. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter and of the 
Dean of the School of Engineering, it was 






158: 



/J 



School of 
Engineering 



COMMITTEE 



District Gage 
Laboratory 



Meeting, Board 
of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To authorize the University to establish a 
District Gage Laboratory of the Springfield 
Ordnance District of the "War Department 
subject to approval by the Trustees of the 
contract with the War Department. 

President Van Meter indicated that the Springfield 
Ordnance District would equip the University with a variety of gage 
equipment such as precision blocks, calipers, thickness gages, 
micrometers, etc. which will be used for the instruction of stu- 
dents or by the staff in research or consulting 'work. The 
University's obligation is to provide suita.ble space which is 
available in the Gunness Engineering Laboratories Building and to 
maintain the laboratory and protect the equipment from loss or 
damage beyond normal wear and tear. About f 30, 000 worth of equip- 
ment would be provided. 

It was agreed to hold a meeting of the full Board of 
Trustees on May 12 at the University, so that the Commencement 
meeting may be brief. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05 P.M. 




r^c^<^< 



_Secretary 



1583 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
May 11, 1950, 7:00 P.M., President's Office, Amherst 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trastees Whitinore, Deely, Brett, Taber, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
George Brehm, Secretary Burke 



Treasurer Hawley reported on the post war building pro- 
gram. In the last five years 18 buildings have been constructed 
with State funds totaling $4-, 941, 333. Twenty-one buildings have 
been constructed with Federal funds totaling §65,000 (cost to 
University) . Seven buildings have been constructed with private 
funds (Alumni Building Corporation) totaling $2,395,017. This 
makes a total of 46 buildings in the five-year period constructed at 

a cost of $7,401,905. 

The Treasurer reported that the Electrical Engineering 
Wing of the main Engineering Building will be completed August 1, 
the Animal Pathology Building September 1, the Power Plant 
October 1, the University Apartments June 30, the Turbine House 
March 1, 1951. 

After discussion, it was 
VOTED: To accept the following buildings: 

1. Home Economics Building as of October 15, 194-3. 

2. Physics Laboratory as of September 19, 194-9 
subject to final completion of certain minor 
items listed by the architect. 

3. The Waltham Field Station Building March 9, 
1950 subject to completion of a few minor 
items as listed by the architect. 



Post War 
Building 
Program 



Engineering 
Building 



Home Economics 
Building 

Physics 
Building 

Waltham Field 
Station 



1584 



COMMITTEE 

ormitories 



Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4. The Brooks, Hamlin and Knovlton dormitories 

as of September 15, 194-9 subject to comple- 
tion of a few minor items as listed by the 
University Superintendent of Buildings. In 
the case of the dormitories the acceptance 
is as lessee from the Alumni Building 
Corporation. 

There was discussion of the construction of two addi- 
tional dormitories by the Alumni Building Corporation. The 
committee explored with the administration the question of whether 
one dormitory should be for men and one for women as originally 
planned and as authorized by the Board of Trustees or whether both 
should be constructed for men. It was argued that if both were 
constructed at the same site, there would be considerable savings. 
Housing for women students would not be delayed as it would mean 
that men students could remove from Knowlton and Hamlin houses 
earlier than had been planned, leaving these dormitories for 
women. It was also pointed out that it would be quite costly at 
this time to attempt to build a dormitory for women to match the 
exterior design of Thatcher Hall. It was agreed to adjourn the 
meeting until Friday morning at 9 o'clock and at that time to 
discuss the question with Registrar Lanphear and Dean Curtis and 
Dean Hopkins. These three agreed that it would be practical to 
construct two dormitories for men. The committee then visited 
sites and finally 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the construction either of one 
double sized men 1 s dormitory or two indi- 
vidual men' s dormitories rather than one 
dormitory for men and one for women as 
originally approved. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported that he had received application 
from Tau Epsilon Phi for an option on Lot A in the Louisa 14. Baker 
tract. This tract was at one time set aside by the Board of 
Trustees for fraternity construction. Kappa Sigma is the only 
house in being on this tract. Alpha Sigma Phi owns a corner lot 
on the tract and there are no options outstanding. However, the 
University Apartment Building has been constructed on the tract 
which has taken away several possible fraternity lots. 



1585 



The committee visited the site on Friday morning, May 12, 



and 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize no 
further options to fraternities or others at 
the present time. 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley and President 

Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 

administration to demolish all temporary wooden 
buildings in Commonwealth Circle with the ex- 
ception of T Building which will be used as the 
Housing Office. 

t 

These buildings are in a dilapidated condition, are un- 
fit for student housing and are costly to maintain. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that he had received a communi- 
cation from the Town of Amherst requesting that the University 
grant a right of way across the property occupied by Mr. David, 
Chief Engineer, for purposes of construction of a sidewalk on the 
west side of North Pleasant Street. The administration recommended 
that this be approved as a safety measure for student pedestrians. 
This area is very heavily traveled by students on foot and it 
would be helpful to have sidewalks on both sides of the road. 
After discussion, it was 



Option of 
Land 



Tau Epsilon 
Phi Fraternity 



Fraternity 
Options 



Commonwealth 
Circle 



Sidewalk 



1586 



COMMITTEE 



Roads, Campus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the granting of a right of -way for 
purposes of sidewalk construction to the 
Town of Amherst across the property 
occupied by the Chief Engineer. 

Mr. Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, re- 
ported that the State Highway Department has agreed to construct 
appropriately $153*000 worth of roads on the University campus. 
He said that this amount would put practically all University 
roads in good condition. Mr. Brehm then reported on the buildings 
and grounds program of the past few years outlining the main work 
which his departments are doing. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 A.M. on Friday, 
May 12. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON EXTENSION SERVICE 
May 12, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Director Munson's Office, Amherst 



Mrs. Leach presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Leach, Orton, Brown, Chandler, 
Cashin, Director Munson 



Director Munson reported on the current programs being 
conducted by the Extension Service in Agriculture and Home Econmoics 
and answered questions of the committee. 

Mrs. Leach pointed out that there was no formal business 
to be transacted but that the meeting was called for the purpose of 
keeping committee members informed on the goals and accomplishments 
of the extension program under Director Munson. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



( 



. ^ 



^Secretary 



1587 



1588 



COMMITTEE 



Tuition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF SPECIAL TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 

TUITION AND FEES 

May 12, 1950, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman Hubbard presiding 



PRESEN T: Trustees Hubbard, Taber, wMtmore, 
Deely, Brown, President Van i-i eter, 
Secretary Burke 



Chairman Hubbard informed the committee members that 100 

members of the Legislature had signed a petition requesting that 

the Trustees not increase the tuition. Secretary Burke^-read 

letter from the Student Government Association dated May 10, 1950 

strongly recommending against an increase in tuition. During the 

meeting the Associate Alumni also sent a communication to the 

Trustees recommending that the tuition not be increased. The 

Legislative Recess Commission on Education has recommended that 

there be no increase in tuition. Following discussion the 

committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize no increase in tuition and dis- 
charge the Special Committee on Tuition. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



( 



1 




^Secretary 






TEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
June 3, 1950, 9:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 



Chairman Vhitmore presiding 



PRESE NT: Trustees Vhitmore, Deely, Taber, 

President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Louis V. Ross, Architect, Raymond H. 
Otto, Chairman of the Campus Planning 
Council, George Brehm, Superintendent 
of Buildings and Grounds, Secretary 
Burke 



89 



It was unanimously 



VOTED : 



To request the Alumni Building Corporation to 
construct a single large housing unit for men 
students in the area west of Chadbourne and 
Greenough dormitories as near as possible to 
Clark Hill Road and as far west as possible 
from Chadbourne and Greenough, to house 
approximately 350 men students and to include 
dining facilities. 



The meeting was adjourned at 10:30 A.M. 



s? 



_Secretary 



Alumni Buildinc 
Corporation 



Dormitories 









1590 



COMMITTEE 



District 

Gage 

Laboratory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



June 3, 1950 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



You will recall that the final terms of the contract 
with the United States Array for the establishment of a District 
Gage Laboratory at the University were left in the hands of the 
Executive Committee of the Board. 

By mail ballot the Executive Committee has now approved 
this contract subject to clearance with the Attorney General and 
with the Commission on Administration and Finance. By mail 
ballot it was 

VOTED: To approve War Department Supply Contract Form 
No. 1 approved by the Under Secretary of War September 16, 1941 
by which the University of Massachusetts and the Springfield 
Ordinance District agree to establish a District Gage Laboratory 
at the University of Massachusetts. Approval is subject to 
clearance of the contract with the Attorney General and with 
the Commission on Administration and Finance. 

Copy of the contract is enclosed. 




^Secretary 



War Department Supply 
Contract Form Do* 1 
Approved by The Under 
Secretary of War 
September 16 , 1943 



■L 



Contract io« 



OF T 



OBPMCB DEPAB3MENT 

(Department) 



(Contractor) 



Contract for 



Amount % 






Place j Springfield Ordnance District , Springfield Armory, Springfield 1, 
Massachusetts, 



The Finance Officer, Springfield Armory, Springfield, Massachusetts is 
designated as the officer to make payments in accordance with this contract. 

The supplies and services to be obtained by this instrument are authorised 
by, are for the purposes set forth in, and are chargeable to allotments below 
enumerated, the available balances of which are sufficient to cover the cost 
thereof: 



This contract is authorized and negotiated under the Armed Services 
Procurement Act of 1947 (Public Law 413 - 30th Congress) 



P500C-4-650 



THIS COITEiCT entered into this day of , 1950, 

between the B11TEB STATES OF A&SRXGA, hereinafter called the Government, rep- 
reseated by the Contracting Officer executing this contract, sad University 
of Massachusetts, a corporation organised and existing under the laws of the 
State of Massachusetts, and haying its principal office at Amherst in said 
State, hereinafter called the University, VIT8BSSEIH THAT 8 



3EHEAS, the Government desires to establish a laboratory at a University 
in the Springfield Ordnance District to be available for use by the Depart- 
ment of the Axmy for inspection, training of personnel, or in the event of a 

national emergency! and 

VH&ftEAS, the University desires to be selected as a location of said 
laboratory in order that the University may have the use of the laboratory 
for instruction, research and consultation purposes 5 and 

WBEKIMS:,' the University is willing to provide adequate facilities for 
the establishment of said laboratory and to assume the -maintenance aad re- 
sponsibility of the laboratory equipment; 

HOW, THEHEFOBE, ia consideration of the premises and obligations herein 
made and undertaken, the parties hereto do mutually agree as follows: 

ARTICLE 1# . Pniyersitv to^¥\im5,Bhfr®r^m 1t (a) The University agrees 
to provide suitable premises, including adequate lighting, water, gas, and 
such other utilities and property as may be necessary for the protection and 
us© of the equipment to be furnished by the Goverssmsnt for the establishment 
of a dimensiomal inspection laboratory* The laboratory • space provided by the 
University will be so insulated, heated and/or sir-conditioned ' a© to maintain 
reasonable constant conditions of temperature and humidity* It 1® desirable, 
though not essentials to maintain these conditions by -means of an air-condi- 
tioning installation which will maintain a dry bulb temperature of 68° P. 
plus or minus 3c p. and a maximum relative bimidity of 



(b) The laboratory space provided by the University must be kept 
free from excessive vibration, dirt, dust or other corrosive contamination 
which could damage the precision measuring equipment or limit its use. 

(c) The laboratory space provided will also be adequate to enable 
the equipment loaned to be utilised to its fullest advantage. * 

(d) The University further agrees to maintain the laboratory in a 
clean and orderly condition at all times, 

ARTICLE 2. GovirangntJSQJBra^ Tho Government agrees to 

furnish and deliver f.o.b. the University for installation in the laboratory 
certain precision measuring aquipiasat and other equipment of the types and ' 
in the quantities suitable for the establishment of a dimensional inspection 
laboratory as more specifically set forth in Schedule A attached hereto. All 
expenses incidental to the installation of said equipment in -the laboratory 
shall be borne hj the University. From time to time the Government may, in 
its discretion, add to or remove from the laboratory various items of equip- 
ment. All expenses incidental to the addition or removal of various item* of 
equipment at the discretion of the Government will be borne hy the Government. 
In the event that any items are so added or removed by the Government, Sched- 
ule A attached hereto shall be amended accordingly by a Supplemental Agreement. 



Contract No. na io_n«:c>_n 



e>i\ r>i 



abttptf 3. Use of Fauipment tar U niversity * Th© Government agrees that 
the University aaTuse ail of the equipment so furnished bj the Government in 
connection with its own courses of instructions with the exception of any 
aonaratus or equipment which may be specifically excepted by the Government 
from such use because of ita special military character. This shall also 
include us® by the University for performing services for industry or for 
research or consultation work. 

ARTICLE A* ^g,„qf_Egyigment and Premises by the .Government, (a) The 
University agrees to make available for 'the instruction of Government military 
or civilian personnel or for research by the Government any apparatus or equip- 
ment owned by the University and normally used in or in connection with the 

laboratory. 

(b) The University further agrees that the laboratory shall be 
available for use by industrial contractors of the Springfield Ordnance 
District upon such terms and conditions as may be approved ley the Deputy 
District Chief of the Springfield Ordnance District and the supervisor of 
the laboratory* 

ARTICLE 5. Supervisor of Laboratory,. The University will designate a 

iumawoav «• in. Jf.x.i.i n. ivm » ii—'«,rn.ii .1. mi »n i<liiiiJ«**» 

mamber of its engineering faculty with a. knowledge of gage laboratory instru- 
ments to act as supervisor of the laboratory. The supervisor will coordinate 
the best interests of the University and the Government, and will have full 
authority in the operation of the laboratory, subject to the provisions of 
this agreement and the directions of the Deputy District Chief of the 
Springfield Ordnance District and the regulations of the University. 

ARTICLE' 6. Title. Title to all property owned and furnished hereunder 
ty the Government"*shall remain in the Government. Such property shall remain 
personal property although it may be affixed to the realty. Title to all pro- 
perty owned and furnished by the University shall remain in the University. 

ARTICLE 7. Maintenance of Property Records. The Property Officer 
at Springfield Ordnance District is designated as the Officer to maintain 
property records of the Government's property in connection with this 
contract. Th© University agrees to furnish such Property Officer with 
those records required by Government property accounting regulations. 

ARTICLE 3. Liability for Government-owned Property. The University 
shall be liable for ail loss of or damage to Government property in its 
possession or custody under this contract, except for reasonable wear and 
tear and except for loss or damage resulting from o r during use thereof by 
the Government or by industrial contractors using the gage laboratory pur- 
suant to Article 4(b). In the performance (but not in limitation) of its 
obligations hereunder, the University will maintain all Government property 
which is not authorised by and in accordance with the provisions of this 
agreement. The University will promptly give written notice to the Govern- 
ment of any loss or damage to Government property in its possession or 
custody by mailing a letter addressed to the" Deputy District Chief, 
Springfield Ordnance District, Springfield 1, Massachusetts. 



2 Contract No. DA 19-059-0RD-24. 



ARTICLE 9» l©n~liaMlityo£ the Government. The Government shall not 
be responsible for damages to property of the University or for personal 
injuries to the officer©, agents, servants, employees, students or other 
persons on the premises as invitees or licensees of the 0ni versity, includ- 
ing, bat not in limitation thereof, employees of industrial contractors in 
the gag© laboratory puzsuant to Article 4(b), arising from or incidental to 
the as© by the University of the property furnished hereunder and the Uni- 
versity shall save the Government harmless from any and all such claims, 
provided that nothing in this paragraph shall be deemed to affect the liability 
of the Government or its own employee©. 

ARTICLE 10* Government 's Bif&t of Access to Laboratory* The Government 
shall have access to the laboratory for purposes of inspection, inventorying 
or for training purposes at all times, provided that suitable arrangements 
are mad© in advance with the supervisor of the laboratory in order that such 
visits will not interrupt or interfere with the regularly scheduled work of 
the University, 

ARTICLE 11* Elimination of Government Property* Except as otherwise 
in this contract specifically provided, the University shall not remove or 
otherwise part with the possession of tmy Goverament-cwned property. The 
University shall not pledge or assign, or transfer or purport to transfer 
title to say of said property in any manner to any third person, either 
directly or indirectly, nor do or suffer anything to be done whereby any of 
such property shall or may be seised, "taken in execution, attached, destroyed, 
or injured. Any violation, of the provision© of this article shall entitle 
the Government forthwith to enter upon the premises wherein such property 
is located or may be found and remove the same. 

ARTICLE 12. gge,joXjyje_Laboratory to be Subject to Rules of the 

• •m-a ." J. BIT-, TT ' T i " tT" """i' ' ' •""****•* " ' "— ■ ru n " I I n ii w h"'7ti i b -, in i | 1 7 

in© use of the laboratory, including ' the iw® contemplated by 



the Government snail at all times be subject to the general rules and regu- 
lations which amy be prescribed by the University relating to the conduct 
of personnel, 

AETICLE 13. Bent, No rent or other charges or e^cpenses r&all be my- 

E ?~r , h@rsT2nd@r ^ either party to the other except as herein otherwise" nro- 
vided, ^ 

ARTICLE U. ISaflSSSiaaL- ***» contract shall be terminable ty the Uni- 
versity, without liability therefor, upon three months written notice ad- 

c«!f S6 l ?/^ 8 S* 1 ** 7 , DiBtriet Chief of the Springfield Ordnance District, 
Springfield a, Massachusetts, and shall be subject to termination by the 
^veriament without liability therefor immediately upon issuance of a written 

Se^iSr?; @P f y ^f^ Chi@f ° f ths Sprtogfteld Ordnance District to 

+h! n^I!!^* U ?? n the issuaac@ of th ® required written notice Ip ©ither 
toe University or the Government, the University shall, at the option of the 

XSSI! 8 ?^ S% r n St °r ,?"* <*™™"L*-™™d property in accordance with 
with cL^Lf f X | a M tB mm @22 P ea{55) > dismantle and pack in accordance 
S™I!f^ *^tnicti«i8 and load on board common carrier all the 
Governmenv-owned property listed on Schedule A attached hereto. 

3 Contract Mo. DA 19-059-0RD-24. 



I 



ARTICLE 15 « Sfepr&g3> In the event that this contract is tenainated 
by either the University or the Government and the Gtovexn&ient, in accord- 
ance with Article 14. hereof, exercises its' option and requests that the 
University ©tore the Qovearssaent-owaed property, the University agrees to 
store all the Gc*ve£nment-owned property listed on Schedule A attached hereto 
at no expense to the Government for a period of -sine months after the ef- 
fective date of said termination or until such time as the Government issues 
instructions for the disposition of the property, whichever is shorter* At 
the eviration of the storage period the University shall , at its own expense, 
dismantle and pack the Government-corned property in accordance with Govern- 
ment instructions and load such property on board common carrier, 

ARTICLE 16* £4&M2JJ3U^lto£ll^ 
During Storage Period, (a) During the storage period, as provided in 
Article 15 hereof, the University shall be liable for loss or destruction 
of or damage 'bo the Govemment-oimed property caused by its failure to com- 
ply with the provisions of this agreement or failure to exercise such care 
in regard to "the property as a reasonably careful owner of similar goods 
would exercise* but it shall not be liable for any loss or destruction of 
or damage to the property which could not have hem avoided by the exercise 
of such care. 



In the event that all or any part of the property is covered 
hy insurance the policy or policies of insurance shall ©spr&ssly provide for 
the payment of benefits directly to the Government to the extent of its in- 
terest, 

ARTICLE 17, Officials Mot to Benefit* Ho member of or delegate to 
Congress-, or resident commissioner, shall be admitted to s.n^ share or part 
of this contract or to any benefit that may arise therefrom; but this pro-? 
vision shall not be construed to extend to this contract if made with a 
corporation for its general benefit. 

ARTICLE 18* Covenant. J^ina t_Contd ngent jggaa * The contractor warrants 

tm— r^r** 1 " 1 ■'■ii* — *r— t— *fr ■n"-'i— i — i-n — — r— -t"t*-i >ti.^i» uhi :M »i » ^M -w i - n » n w '&-g* iiJw> ^ 

that $>% has not employed any person to solicit or secure this contract upon 
any agreement for a commission, percentage, brokerage, or contingent fee. 
Breach of this warranty shall give the Government the right to annul the con- 
tract, or, in its discretion, to deduct from the contract price or consider- 
ation tile amount of such commission, percentage, brokerage, or contingent 
fees- This warranty shall not apply to commissions payable by contractors 
upon contracts or sales secured or made through bona fide established commer- 
cial or selling agencies maintained hj the Contractor for the purpose of 
securing business* 

ARTICLE 19* ^n^i^iscriin^atiQa> (a) The Contractor, in performing 
the work required by this contract, shall not discriminate against any em- 
ployee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national 
origin. 



Contract Ko* DA 19-059-0RB-24 



The Contracted agrees that the provision of paragraph (a) 
above wip. also be inserted in all of its subcontracts. For the purpose 
of this article, a subcontract is defined as any contract entered into by 
the contractor with any individual , partnership , a si sedation, corporation, 
estate, or trust, or other business enterprise or other legal entity, for 
a specific part of the work to be performed in connection with the supplies 
or services furnished under this contract! provided? however, that a contract 
for the furnishing of standard or commercial articles or raw material shall 
not foe considered as a subcontract, 

ABTICLE 20, Elghtr-hour Law , No laborer or mechanic doing any part of 
the work contemplated by this contract, in the employ of the contractor or 
any subcontractor contracting for any part of said work contemplated, shall 
be required or permitted to work more than 8 hours in any one calendar day 
upon such work at the site thereof, except upon the condition that compen- 
sation is paid to such laborer or mechanic in accordance with the provisions 
of this article, "The wages of every laborer and mechanic employed by the 
contractor or any subcontractor engaged in the performance of this contract 
shall be compensated for all hours worked in excess of S tours per day at 
not less than one and one-half times the basic rate of pay. For each vio- 
lation of the requirements of this article a penalty of $5 shall be imposed 
upon the contractor for each laborer or mechanic for every calendar day in 
which such employee is required or permitted to labor more than 8 hours 
upon said work without receiving compensation computed in accordance with 
this article, and all penalties thus imposed shall be withheld for the use 
and benefit of the Government: Provided i That this stipulation shall be 
subject in all respects to the exceptions and provisions of tJ, S. Code, title 
40, sections 321, J2U$ 325, and 326, relating to hours of labor, as 
modified by the provisions of Section 303 of Public Act So, 731, 76th Con- 
gress, approved September 9, 194-0, relating to compensation for overtime, 

ARTICLE 21* Convict Lab or, The contractor shall not employ any person 
undergoing sentence of imprisonment at hard labor. This provision shall not 
be construed to prevent the contractor or any subcontractor hereunder from 
obtaining any of the supplies, or any component parts or ingredients thereof, 
to be furnished under this contract or any of the materials or supplies to 
be used in connection with the performance of this contract, directly or in- 
directly, from any Federal, State or territorial prison or prison industry, 
Provided, that such articles, materials or supplies are not produced pursuant 
to any contract or other arrangement under which prison labor is hired by or 
employed or used by any private person, firm or corporation, 

ARTICLE 22. D ispu tes., Except as otherwise specifically provided in this 
contract, all disputes concerning questions of fact which may arise under this 
contract, and which are not disposed of by mutual agreement, shall be decided 
by the Contracting Officer, who shall reduce his decision to writing and mail 
a copy thereof to the Contractor at his address shown herein. Within 30 days 
from said mailing the Contractor may appeal in writing to the Secretary of the 
Army, whose written decision or that of his designated representative or repre- 
sentatives thereon shall be final and conclusive upon the parties hereto. The 



Contract No. DA 19-Q59-0BD-24 



Secretary of the Army may, in his discretion, designate an Individual, or in- 
dividuals, other than the Contracting Officer, or a Board as his authorized 

representative to determine appeals under this Article* The Contractor shall 
be afforded an opportunity to be heard and offer evidence in support of his 
appeal. The president of the board, from t3me to time* may divide the board 
into divisions of one or more members @xid assign members thereto. 1 a&Jority 
of the members of the board or of a division thereof shall constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of the business of the board or of a division, respectively, 
and the decision of a majority of the members of the board or of a division 
shall be deemed to be the decision of the board or of a division, as the case 
may be. If a majority of the members of a division are unable to agree on a 
decision or if within 30 days after a decision by a division, the board or the 
president thereof directs that the decision of the division be reviewed by the 
board, the decision will be so reviewed, otherwise the decision of a majority 
of the members of a division shall 'become the decision of the board. If a 
majority of the members of the board is unable to agree upon a decision, the 
president will promptly submit the appeal to the Under Secretary of the Army 
for his decision upon the record, A vacancy in the board or in any division 
thereof shall not impair the powers, nor affect the duties of the board or 
division nor of the regaining .ismbars of the board or division, respectively. 
Any member of the board, or any esaminer designated by the president of the 
board for that purpose, may hold hearings, examine witnesses, receive evidence 
and report the evidence to the board or to the appropriate division, if the 
ease is pending before a division. Fending decision of a dispute hereunder the 
Contractor shall diligently proceed with the performance of this contract* Any 
sum or sums allowed to the Contractor under the provisions of this Article shall 
be paid by the United States as part of the cost of the articles or work herein 
contracted for and shall, be deemed to be within the contemplation of his con- 
tract. 

ARTICLE 23* Definitions... Except, for the origins! signing of this contract 
and except as otherwise stated herein, the term "Contracting Officer 9 as used 
herein shall include his duly appointed successor or his authorised repre- 
sentative. 



6 Contract Ho* DA 19~Q59~QBB-&4 



I 



ARTICLE Alteration* The folia '.. ;<es ware made la 'this 

contract, before it was signed lay the parties hereto* 



IN WITNESS WHEBEGF, the parti es hereto have executed this contract as 
of the day and year first above written. 

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



Two Witnesses: 



(Address) 



(Address) 



Business Address) 



I, , certify that X am the 

of the corporation named as Contractor herein; that 

who signed this contract on behalf of fee Contractor was then 

of said corporation; that said contract was duly signed for and in behalf of 
said corporation by authority of its governing body, and is within the scope 
of its' corporate powers. 



Secretary 



(Corporate Seal) 



I hereby certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, based upon 
observation and inquiry, who signed this contract for 

the had authority to execute the same, and 

is the individual who signs similar contracts on behalf of this corporation with 
the public generally. 



*!■ ■ mt m im hitoiw* «e« 



(Contracting Officer) 



R P522-1-104.9 
4-50 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



! 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 22, 1950, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman Vhitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Vhitmore, Eartlett, Brett, 
Deely, Hubbard, Taber, President 
Van dieter, Treasurer Hawley, George 
Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds, Secretary Burke 

The Trustees invited architect Ross to discuss with them 
a proposed elimination of dining room and kitchen from the new 
Alumni Dormitory to be constructed in the near future. 

The Trustees have approved the construction of this 
dormitory including dining hall facilities. Since this was 
approved, the Legislature has appropriated $600,000 for the con- 
struction of a new dining commons. Because of rising costs, 
Mr. Ross said it would be impossible to construct with the 
$800,000 available a dormitory for 350 students which would also 
include kitchen and dining facilities. He estimated that at least 
$150,000 more would be needed to include dining facilities. 

He said that If the dining facilities are eliminated the 
building could be made to accommodate 20 more students or a total 
of approximately 3&5^ Larger recreation facilities could be pro- 
vided and a store included. 

Trustee Brett pointed out that the building would also 
liquidate easier without dining facilities. 

Treasurer Hawley presented figures to indicate that the 
present student body could be fed without a dining hall in the 
new dormitory. He said that 400 can be accommodated in Greenough, 



1591 



Dormitories 



1592 



COMMITTEE 



Dining 
Commons 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

200 in Eutterfield, 4-00 in Draper and 1,000 in the new uining 
hall to be constructed by the Commonwealth - a total of 2,000. 
Approximately 2,200 students are now residing in University build- 
ings, but not all of these eat at the University. In view of 
building costs ana of the appropriation of the State of $600,000 
for a Boarding Hall , it was 

VOTED: To rescind the action of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee of June 3 which 
recommended construction of a new dormi- 
tory by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association housing approximately 
350 students and including a dining hall. 

It was 

VOTED: To request the University of Massachusetts 

Building .Association to construct a dormitory 
for men students in the area west of Chadbourne 
and Greenough dormitories as near as possible 
to Clark Hill Road and as far west as possible 
from Chadbourne and Greenough to house approxi- 
mately 365 students but not to include kitchen 
or dining facilities. 

There followed discussion of plans for the new Boarding 
Kail to be constructed with the $600,000 appropriation provided 
by the Commonwealth. Treasurer Hawley presented a list of in- 
terested architects. It was pointed out that iialoney & Tessier 
of Springfield were appointed by the Trustees in 194-3 to make 
preliminary studies of a dining hall. It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Maloney & Tessier of Springfield as 
architect for the dining hall. The 
committee recommended as alternates 
James A. Britten of Greenfield and 
Hampson & Fisher of Pittsfield. 



COMMITTEE 



*H 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley presented a list of architects interested 

in preparing plans for the $90,000 Isolation Building addition to 

the Animal Disease Control Laboratory. The Trustees felt that the 

plans should be prepared by the architect who planned the main 

building. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees appoint 

Louis W. Ross as architect for the Isola- 
tion Building addition to the Animal 
Disease Control Laboratory. The committee 
recommended as alternates Alderman & 
Alderman of Holyoke and McClintock & Craig 
of Springfield. 

It was also 

VOTED: To request that the Secretary issue a mail 
ballot so that the full Board may act upon 
these recommendations as early as possible. 

It was 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to execute contract in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees for the exten- 
sion of Steam, Electric and Water Service 
Lines as provided for in the appropriation by 
the 19 A9 Legislature (Account 7313-05, 
Project P-E2) and in accordance with plans 
approved by the Massachusetts Public Building 
Commission. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 



Animal 
Disease 
Control 
Laboratory 



Steam 
Lines 



! 




Secretary 



1594 



COMMITTEE 



University 
Apartments 



Electrical 

Engineering 

Wing 



Power 
Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GFOUNDS 
November 20, 1950, 12:30 P.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Whitmore, Deely, Taber, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, George Brehm, Super- 
intendent of Buildings & Grounds, 
and Secretary Burke 

The members of the committee, having previously viewed 

the University Apartment Building, and upon the recommendation of 

the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds and the Treasurer 

VOTED: To recommend that the Executive Committee 
accept the building as completed effective 
November 15, 1950. 

The committee inspected the Electrical Engineering Wing 

and talked with architect W. Cornell Appleton. This building has 

been in partial use for instruction purposes since October. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
accept the building as completed as of 
November 1 subject to the completion of a 
few minor items. 

It was agreed that the architect would inform the Treasurer of the 

completion of these items before final payment would be made. 

The committee inspected the Power Plant and discussed 

the building with Edward C. Brown, architect, and 

VOTED i To recommend that the Executive Committee 
accept the building as completed as of 
November 1, 1950 subject to the completion 
of a few minor items. 

It was understood that the architect will certify completion of 

these items to the Treasurer before final payment is made. 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee then visited the Arms Storage Building 

attached to the Drill Hall and discussed the building with Colonel 

Todd, Commandant of the ROTC. It -was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
accept the building as completed on 
October 1, 1950. 

The committee drove through the Federal Circle area to 

observe the condition of these temporary apartments for married 

students. There are 13 buildings in Federal Circle which include 

94- separate apartments. Treasurer Hawley and Superintendent Erehm 

pointed out the badly-deteriorated condition of the buildings both 

externally and internally. They are very expensive to maintain, 

they said, and are unfit as dwelling units. After inspection, 

the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 

authorize the Treasurer to demolish approxi- 
mately half of the apartments in the summer 
of 1951 and the other half by the summer of 
1952 with the stipulation that present 
occupants not be forced out so long as they 
remain students in the University and also 
with the stipulation that the dwellings not 
be made available to new occupants. 

There was discussion of the need for an additional 
woman' s dormitory by the fall of 1953. President Van Meter said 
that the University admitted 300 freshman women in the fall of 
1950." It is planning to admit 4.00 freshman women in the fall of 
1951. In order to accommodate freshman classes of 4-00 women, an 
additional dormitory will be necessary. 

The committee was hesitant to request the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association to construct another dormitory 
for women in the face of present building costs. However, after- 
discussion, it was 



m 



Arms Storage 
Building 



Federal 
Circle 



Woman's 
Dormitory 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



1596 



COMMITTEE 



Room 
Rentals 



Public Health 
Building 

architect for 



Britton, James 
A. - architect 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend that the Executive Committee 
request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to seek authorization 
for construction of an additional woman's 
dormitory to house approximately 175 women 
provided that the dormitory would be truly 
self -liquidating. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Treasurer to make a study 
of room rents to determine whether these 
should be raised and if so how much in 
order that the self-liquidating dormitories 
may be adequately financed. 

The Treasurer agreed to report at the next annual meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that he has received 26 appli- 
cations for architectural services for the proposed Public Health 
Building. Funds have not yet been made available for plans but it 
is hoped that the Federal Government will provide the money. After 
reviewing the list of architects, the committee 

VOTE D; To recommend that the Executive Committee 
nominate James A. Britton of Greenfield as 
architect for the Public Health Building 
when funds are available, with second 
choice of M. A. Dyer Company of Boston and 
Appleton & Stearns of Boston as third 
choice. 

The meeting was adjourned at U'» 15 P.M. 




Secretary 



] 



IOMMITTEE 



I 



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1597 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 29, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
4-9 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Trustees Mrs. Leach, Whitmore, 
Brett, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

In the absence of Chairman Bartlett, Trustee Whitmore pre- 
sided. Mr. Whitmore presented recommendations of the Trustee 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds which met at the University on 
November 20. On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To accept the University Apartment Building 
as completed effective November 15, 1950. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To accept the Electrical Engineering Wing 
as completed as of November 1 subject to 
the completion of a few minor items. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept the Power Plant as completed as 
of November 1, 1950 subject to the com- 
pletion of a few minor items. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept the Arms Storage Building as com- 
pleted on October 1, 1950. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 



University 
Apartments 



Electrical 

Engineering 

Wing 



Power 
Plant 



Arms Storage 
Building 



1598 



COMMITTEE 



Federal 
Circle 



Women ' s 
Dormitory 



Public Health 
Building 



Tuition 

and 
Fees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to demolish 

approximately half of the Federal Circle 
Apartments in the summer of 1951 and the 
remaining portion by the summer of 19 5^ 
with the stipulation that present occupants 
not be forced out so long as they remain 
students in the University and also with 
stipulation that the buildings not be made 
available to new occupants. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to seek authorization 
for construction of an additional woman's 
dormitory to house approximately 175 women 
provided that the dormitory would be truly 
self -liquidating. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To nominate James A. Britton of Greenfield 
as architect for the Public Health Building 
when funds are available with second choice 
of M. A. Dyer Company of Boston and Appleton 
& Stearns of Boston as third choice. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that present Trustee regula- 
tions require that students pay tuition and fees at the time of 
registration. With the present size of the student body, it is 
extremely difficult for the students to make this payment on regis- 
tration day and also take care of registration. There is delay, 
confusion and waste of time on the part of the students. He said 
that some other colleges and universities are requiring advance 
payment in order to expedite registration. 

The present regulation states "all charges for tuition, 
fees, board and room rent in University Dormitories are due at the 
beginning of each semester and must be paid on or before the open- 
ing date of the semester. Students may not enter classes until 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



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! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

registration charges are paid. Any student who does not complete 
his registration, including payment of semester charges, on the 
regular registration days will be required to pay a fine of five 



dollars." 



After discussion, it was 



VOTED : That the above be amended to 
"all charges for tuition, fee 
rent in University Dormitorie 
able seven days prior to the 
tion for each semester. Any 
not make payment of his semes 
the time specified or who doe 
registration on the days pres 
quired to pay a fine of five 



read as follows: 
s, board and room 
s are due and pay- 
date of registra- 
student who does 
ter charges within 
s not complete his 
cribed will be re- 
dollars . " 



Budget 



Treasurer Hawley said that since the 1952 capital outlay 
budget was prepared serious need has arisen for the development of 
utility lines. It had been expected that some of this work could 
be taken care of out of present funds but costs are higher and it 
will be necessary to seek new funds to get the work done. $95,000 
is needed for electrical lines to serve the area of the new Boarding Electric Lines 



Hall and the new Dormitory. $55? 000 is needed for steam lines 

for the same two areas and also for the Farm area. $15,000 is 

needed for sewers. These items together with engineering services 

would cost approximately $137,000. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to amend the 1952 
budget to include an item of $137,000 for 
utility lines. 

There was discussion of the recent action of the Trustees 

authorizing the Legislative Committee to file a bill to fix the 

salary of the President at $15,000 and it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to amend the 

budget to request reclassification of the 
President's salary to $15,000. 



99 



Steam Lines 



Sewers 



Utility 
Services 



Salaries - 



for President 



1600 



COMMITTEE 

Salaries of - 

Admi ni s t r a t i ve 
Officers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to amend the 

budget to include salary reclassifications 
for certain administrative officers which 
had been requested by the Trustees in the 
1951 budget but which had been overlooked 
in the preparation of the 1952 budget as 
follows : 

To fix the salary of the Dean of the 
College of Arts and Science, the Dean of 
the School of Engineering, and the 
Secretary of the University in salary 
grade 63 > and 

To fix the salaries of the Dean of the 
University and the Treasurer of the 
University in salary grade 66. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 P.M. 




Secretary 



i 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION 
December U, 1950, 12 Noon, President's Office, Amherst 



Chairman Taber presided 



PRESENT: Trustees Taber, Haigis, Deely, 

Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Mr. Musgrave, 
Mr. Hoar, Secretary Burke 



The Committee discussed the desirability of a revision 
of the booklet published a few years ago by the Associate Alumni 
concerning state support of higher education in Massachusetts as 
compared with other states. There was discussion as to what 
material would be most effective in such a publication and it was 
agreed that Professor Musgrave and Mr. Hoar would cooperate with 
the Alumni in the preparation of a booklet. It was agreed that 
final decision as to publication would be made by the Chairman in 
January or early February. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 P.M. 




Secretary 



1601 



Booklet, 
illustrated 



1602 



COMMITTEE 



Military 
Prooerty 

bond 



Dormitory 
Room Rents 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
February 5, 1951, 3:00 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 



In the absence of Chairman 
Haigis, Trustee Brett pre- 
sided. 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Brett, Bartlett, Taber, 
Cashin, whitmore, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer ^awley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the value of the military 

property at the University is approximately $165,000 with another 

$30,000 worth of equipment on order. The present bond covering 

military property loaned by the Federal Government to the Univer- 



sity is $125,000 and the Army authorities feel that this bond 

should be increased. There is no charge for the bond. After 

consideration, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Treasurer to increase the 
amount of the present bond covering 
military property loaned by the Federal 
Government to the University from 
$125,000 to f 300, 000. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that he has completed a study 
of dormitory room rents at the University in response to a request 
for information from some of the Trustees. He said that quite a 
number of rooms in the past have been rented at more than capacity. 
Three students have been living in a two student room or two stu- 
dents have been living in a one student room, when these dormi- 
tories are operated at normal capacity, income from rents at the 



i 



:OMMITTEE 



II 



II 



$130-$150 


♦3-45 

H 


25 cents 



1603 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

rate of 1150 a year is not sufficient to cover the cost of operation 

of the dormitories. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve an annual student rental rate for 
self-liquidating dormitories of $165 
effective September 1951 and other dormi- 
tory rental rates as follows: 

State owned dormitories 

Weekly rates for conferences and 

special schools 
Weekly rates for Summer Session 
Daily rates for students, Alumni and 

4.-H Club members 
Daily rates for conferences of other 

groups 

The above rates cover room rentals without bedding and 
room service. When these are supplied the rates are to be ad- 
justed to cover their cost. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the University is 

cooperating with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health in 

the offering of 5-day short courses in Public Health. The State 

department provides almost all the instruction, and employees of 

the department enroll for the courses to improve their work for 

Public Health units within the State. The Treasurer recommended 

that employees of the State Department of Public Health should not 

be required to pay tuition for these courses. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the President to remit the 
tuition of those students who enroll in 
5-day short courses in Public Health who 
are employees of the xMassachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 

it was 



Public Health 
Short Courses 



Remission of 
tuition 



1604 



COMMITTEE 



Summer Session 
Rates 



Cancellation of 
Notes 



Treasurer' s 
Annual Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the following rates for the 12 
week Summer Session beginning in 1951. 

Tuition, resident students $40.00 

Tuition, non-resident undergraduate students $160.00 
Tuition, non-resident graduate students $7-50 per credi' 

hour . 
Room rent $4- .00 per week 

Board, 5-day week, Monday- Friday $9.50 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the Attorney General has 

recommended the cancellation of notes of six former students on 

the grounds that the notes are uncollectible. It was 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Treasurer to cancel the 
notes of six former students which have 
been reported by the Attorney General's 
department as uncollectible. 



Nello Fiorio 


3/16/43 


$50.00 


Herbert Gross 


2/17/42 


110.00 


Herbert Gross 


5/15/42 


40.00 


Leonard Rice 


3/17/37 


100.00 


Paul G. Armitage 


2/13/33 


3.00 


Paula Y . Holmes 


3/18/37 


43.05 



The Chairman said that the annual report of the 
Treasurer had been mailed to all members of the Board in advance 
of the meeting. For this reason he did not request that the re- 
port be read. The Treasurer answered questions on the report and 
the committee examined the list of investments of endowment funds 
but recommended no changes. After consideration, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
accept the report of the Treasurer for 
the fiscal year closing June 30, 1950 
as presented. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:20 P.M. 




Secretary 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON EXTENSION SERVICE 
February 5, 1951, 4*20 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 



Mrs. Leach, Chairman 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Mrs. Leach, Brown, Cashin, 
Bartlett, Desmond, Chandler, Presi- 
dent Van Meter, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter recommended that James ¥. Dayton who 
has been State County Agent Leader since February 1, 1943 be 
appointed as successor to ¥illard A. Munson, Director of the Exten- 
sion Service. The President said that a number of other candidates 
have sought the position and that he and Dean Sieling of the School 
of Agriculture have given careful consideration to the applicants 
and to the needs of the position. He said that he and Dean Sieling 
are both convinced that Mr. Dayton will make the best Director of 
all the persons who were considered. He reviewed Mr. Dayton's ex- 
perience and qualifications and after discussion, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

appoint James W. Dayton as Associate Dean 
and Director of the Extension Service in 
Agriculture and Home Economics effective 
February 1, 1951 at annual salary of &7560. 

To succeed Mr. Dayton as State County Agent Leader, the 

President recommended H. Sidney Vaughan who is now Associate 

County Agricultural Agent in Worcester County. Mr. Vaughan is 

highly recommended by Dean Sieling and by Mr. Dayton. After 

discussion, it was 



605 



Promotion of: 



Dayton, James W, 



^ 



Appointment of: 



Vaughan, H. 
Sidney 



1606 



COMMITTEE 



Promotion of: 



Sylstra, 
Anthony W. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
appoint H. Sidney Vaughan as State 
County Agent Leader effective March 1, 
1951 at annual salary- of &6060. 

The President reported a vacancy in the position of Ex- 
tension Poultry Pathologist and recommended the appointment of 
Dr. Anthony W. Sylstra. The committee requested further informa- 
tion as to Dr. Sylstra' s education and experience and the meeting 
was adjourned until Tuesday, February 6, at 10:4-5 A.M. so that the 
additional information could be obtained. 

On February 6, at 10s 4-5 A.M., at the Statler Hotel, the 

following committee members reconvened: Mrs. Leach, Trustees 

Brown, Cashin, Chandler and Desmond and after hearing a report on 

Dr. Sylstra' s education and experience, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
appoint Dr. Anthony W. Sylstra as Exten- 
sion Poultry Pathologist effective 
April 1, 1951 at annual salary of $5760. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 A.M. 




y^yp^u^>^- 



_Secretary 



i 



COMMITTEE 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 5, 1951, 5:00 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

In the absence of Chairman 
Carmichael, Trustee Desmond 
presided. 

PRESENT ; Trustees Desmond, Bartlett, Orton, 
Mrs. Mc^amara, President Van Meter, 
Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the following new courses of study: 

BOTANY 90. Insect Transmission of Plant Diseases . - 
A lecture course dealing with the intri- 
cate interrelationships of insects and 
micro-organism, with particular emphasis 
on the basic role played by insects in 
the inception, distribution, and perpetua- 
tion of plant diseases. 



3 class hours. 



Credit, 






BOTANY 33 . Plan t Cytogenetics. - The interpretation 

of heredity phenomena in plants in terms of 
cell structure. This study is a correlation 
of plant cytology with genetics and is of 
applied as well as theoretical importance. 
The lectures encompass various aspects of 
cytogenetics in relation to heredity, muta- 
tion, evolution, and sy sterna tics. The 
laboratory work includes study of physiology, 
structure, and development of plant cells 
with particular emphasis on experimental 
production of polypoids and structural 
hybrids . 
2 class hours; 

1 2-hour laboratory. Credit, 3» 

Prerequisite, Zoology 53 (!)• 



607 



New Courses 



1608 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate School 



regulations of 



Degrees of: 

M.S. in Civil 
Engineering 

M.S. in Electri- 
cal Engineering 

M.S. in Mechani- 
cal Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

PHYSICA L EDU CATION 88 (II ) . Prevention and Care of 
At hletic Injuries . - Covers the prevention 
and correction of accidents in athletic 
activities. Use of proper personal and 
field equipment, conditioning exercises, 
the medical examination, and therapeutic 
aids. Includes clinical use of physiotherapy 
equipment, massage, and advanced training 
methods. 
2 class hours. Credit, 2. 

President Van Meter said that with the retirement of 
Director Sievers who was both Director of the Experiment Station 
and Director of the Graduate School, the Trustees had appointed 
Gilbert L. Voodside as Dean of the Graduate School. Dr. Voodside 
and a committee of the Graduate School have been working ever 
since his appointment to adopt a set of regulations to govern ad- 
mission and awarding of degrees. The President said that he is 
heartily in accord with the recommendations which the committee 
has prepared and which have been approved by the faculty of the 
Graduate School. There was lengthy discussion of the regulations 



and, it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve regulations for the Graduate 
School as stated on the accompanying 
sheets. 



President Van Meter said that the Departments of Civil 
Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering 
have been accredited by the Professional Engineering Societies. 
The School has a good staff and is well equipped to offer advanced 
work in these fields. The Engineering faculty would like the 
authority to develop programs leading toward the Master's degree 
and would like to have Trustee approval of the offering of such de- 
gree as a prelude to the development of an advanced program. 






OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After discussion, and upon the recommendation of the 

President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the granting of the degrees Master of Science in 
Civil Engineering, Master of Science in Electri- 
cal Engineering, and Master of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering as soon as appropriate 
programs may be developed and approved by the 
Board of Trustees and as candidates complete 
these programs. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees name 

Fred J. Sievers Emeritus Director of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and Emeritus 
Director of the Graduate School effective on 
his retirement November 30 > 1950. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees name 
Villard A. Munson Emeritus Director of the 
Extension Service in Agriculture and Home 
Economics effective on his retirement 
January 31, 1951. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees name 

John B. Lentz Emeritus Professor of Veterinary 
Science effective on his retirement 
January 31, 1951. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees pro- 
mote Dr. Kenneth L. Bullis from Professor to 
Head of the Department of Veterinary Science 
effective February l, 1951. 

Secretary Burke read communication in behalf of Elvin 

T. Miles, a graduate student to the effect that Miles had been 

required by the Graduate School to take written examinations in 

his minor subjects long after the completion of the subjects. It 

was stated that Mr. Miles entered the Graduate School with the 



1609 



Sievers, Fred J, 
Emeritus 
Director of th« 
Agricultural Ex- 
periment Statior 



Munson, Villard 
A. , Emeritus 
Director of the 
Extension 
Service 



Lentz, John B. 
Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Vetera 
nary Science 



Promotion of: 
Bullis, Kenneth 
L. 



Miles, Elvin T. 



1610 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



understanding, as stated in the Graduate School catalogue, that 
examinations in the minor subjects would be given on the completion 
of the subjects. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To refer the matter to the President. 
*he meeting was adjourned at 6 o'clock. 




Secretary 






- 






all be de- 
acil sub -<lent 

nts f i 

The 0: **S 

reg£ bo bhe 

Students may be admitted to the Graduate School either on limited status 
or- on full 

bs for admission on 11: status 

X, 3gree or its equivalent from any college 

or um ' ?f rec sed standing. 

official transcript of all previous college work* 

3c A letter of recoi : the head of the department 

gor or a letter from his 
sertain circumstances a student 
me- oil* tentative! • courses in the University without 

fulfilled requirements (2* (official transcript) and 
(3 of the department of the appli- 

cai undergradu or a letter from his present em- 
ployer) but no credit will "be given until the requirements 
are I lied. 

L> Acceptance by the department and by the Admissions Committee 
o< : ' Graduate School Council. Graduate students on 
limited status will be held to the same standard of per- 
formance as Graduate £ ts on full status. If they wish 
to become Graduate Students on full status they may petition 
the Admissions Committee of the Graduate School Council , 

s 

B, Requirements fo aission on full status 

1. A Bachelor's Degree or the equivalent from any college or 
university of recognised standing. 

2, An official transcript of all previous college work. 

■ 3, A letter of recommendation from the head of the department 
of the applicant's undergraduate Tiajor, 



I 



rora 

in + -i 
ing class., lo net meet this requ: nt 

r admj - ) If the. transcript 

do-. the : the a it is the duty of 

the C . n Admissions to evaluate the transcripts 

Ace nee by id by the Admissions Committee 

of the Graduate Sc . S&tdents on limited status may 
full state o'n of a satisfactory record 

. this Univ. . . . n of the department con- 

Committee on Admissions. 

Individual c iditional specific requirements for 

admissioi tould be stated i a Graduate School 

le of '.fie requirement might be the Graduate 

i to bl :.ooi czx either limited or full status 

does not :' for an advanced degree., 

Si School may be dismissed for failure to 

abide b lies c. . . - by. 

The Graduate S ::il recommends to the Board of Trustees that 
the above regulations relating to admission to the Graduate School shall apply 
for admission as of :-. , - it 1951° 

of BO or above is required of each graduate student in not 
less than 80 percent in all lajor and minor credits which the student offers 
to fulfill requirements for an advanced degree. Seventy-five is the minimum 
passing grade in any graduate course, 

Requir emen ts u for Jte grees 

It is recommended that the basic requirements for the Master of 
Science and the Master of Arts degrees should . 3 follows! 

A. The earning of thirty credit 

s 

Be Not more than six credit hours may be transferred from other 
I] ons, 

C Twenty-one of the thirty' credits must be in the major field* 

D. is is offered, six credit; rned in courses 

open to graduate stucie uly; if a thesis is not offered, twelve 
err, must be earned in courses open bo graduate students only, 
• Not more than ten credits may be earned by means of a thesis., 



,1 

al 
ipervision 

led 
11 

■ 

with the school 

- 

, for any course ; t 

±±s±, "ogue. 



■ 



l 



I 



- school or .-.rtaier jmed is entitled to se 
sic reouirements. It must, however, report such additions 
to the Dean of the Gradu* ?or purposes of reference. 
All achievement rsoorts shall be bed to the office of the 
Dean of the Graduate School for final appraisal in terras of 
basic and suj \entary requirements as indicated above. 

Beouirements for the Ph„D a : Credits, at least ninety credits in all, 
at least sixty of which must be in the major field, at least fifteen in another 
field or fields related to, but not part of, the major field and not more than 
thirty in recognition of the disc bion. 

preliminary written comprehensive examination in the major and 
mt] dented by an oral examination at the option of the major de- 

oarta»en th examinations to be conducted by the department concerned, to be. 
W-<-d y ht months before 1- ,-pleticn of the candidate -s 

i a candidate may be permitted a second and final oppor- 
tunity, but not with >ve months. 

wm&z • dent; two languages, foreign to the candidate and 

not in tr- ic group, as recommended by the major department, Pro- 
fi{ - should I ssed as early as possible and must be passed prior 
to tl 

nal E on" the c lust pass a tl examination, at 
least partly oral, conducted by the Thesis Committee primarily upon, but not 
limited to," the contents of the candidate's dissertation. 

Residences at lease 30 course credits must have been earned at this 
University. No credit is valid after 9 years, 



TonnjsvtT OC TQiTi 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3MMITTEE 



Amherst, Mass. 



April 10, 1951 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letters dated April 2, 1951 from Secretary 
Burke and Treasurer Hawley to the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees, University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail 
ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

April 2, 1951 

Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

In the enclosed letter, Treasurer Hawley has outlined 
the details of three construction contracts which need to be 
executed. Chairman Bartlett has authorized the Secretary to send 
a mail poll to members of the Executive Committee to avoid the 
necessity of calling a special meeting. 

After you have read the enclosure, would you please indi- 
cate your approval or disapproval on this ballot. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James ¥. Burke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



April 2, 1951 



To: Trustee Executive Committee 
Subject: Contracts for Construction 



Since the last meeting of the Board of Trustees plans 
have been developed for three reconstruction projects as follows; 



1. Addition to Greenhouse, waltham 

Low bid, Lord & Burnham 

2. Reconstruction of Homestead 

Low bid, Aquadro & Cerruti 

3. Repairs of Cage Sky-Light 

Bids to be opened April 6. 



$12,976.00 



24,895.26 



Estimate 20,000.00 



Construction 
Contracts 



1612 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Funds have been appropriated for the above projects and 
necessary authorizations have been secured from State Authorities. 
It is important that the work be started as soon as possible. The 
Chairman, Dr. Bartlett, has authorized a poll of the Executive 
Committee by mail to see if they will authorize the Treasurer to 
sign the necessaiy contracts. 

Project 1 is for an addition of 4-1 ' 9g" to one of the 
greenhouses at Waltham. This addition is needed because of in- 
crease of work at the station and provision for it was included 
in our budget of the current year. 

Project 2 provides for the reconstruction of the Home 
Economics Practice House which had to be abandoned this year be- 
cause of termite damage. Plans have been prepared in collaboration 
with the Department of Entomology by which the building will be 
restored and so constructed, we believe, as to eliminate the danger 
of another infestation. 

Project 3 provides for the rebuilding of the glass roof 
of the Physical Education Cage. The roof now leaks badly and much 
of the metal supports have deteriorated to such extent as to 
create a hazard in the use of the building. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 

MAIL BALLOT 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Executive Committee of Board of Trustees 
Mail Vote 

In accordance with the explanation in the Treasurer's 
letter of April 2, 1951, I hereby vote to X (cross out one 

not to not applicable) 

Authorize the Treasurer to execute contracts in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees for (l) Addition to Greenhouse at 
Waltham Field Station, (2) Reconstruction of Homestead and (3) Re- 
pairs to Cage Sky-Light. 



Signed: 



April A, 1951 



Ralph F. Taber 
Joseph ¥. Bartlett 




A. C. Brett 
Philip F. whitmore 
Lottie A. l>each 



Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

April 11, 1951, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 

Chairman Deely presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Deely, Bartlett, Brown, Mrs. Leach, 
■President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, Dean 
Machmer, Secretary Burke; the following 
faculty members of the Academic Activities Boarc. 
- Rand, Emery, Dickinson; the following 
faculty members of the Athletic Board - 
McGuirk, Allan, Lanphear, Snoeyenbos, 
Roberts, Anderson; Leon Stanne, Alumni 
Representative on the Athletic Board; 
and the following student members of the 
above-named boards - Edward Tyler, Carol 
Hinds, Edna Joslin, Alice O'Donnell, 
Warren Alberts, David i%nn, William Ratner, 
Gordon Francis and Gordon Taylor. 

Chairman Deely reviewed the informal session held in the 
President's Office on April 10 at 7:00 P.M. vhich was attended by 
practically all persons at this meeting except the Trustees. He 
read President Van Meter's letter of March 20 outlining the general 
purposes of the Trustee Committee on Recognized Student Activities. 
Mr. Deely said he was very much pleased with the unanimity of 
opinion concerning the value to the University of academic activi- 
ties and that he was particularly pleased with the feeling of 
common purpose which exists between members of the Athletic Board 
and members of the Academic Activities Board. 

At Mr. Deely' s request, Secretary Burke read informal 
minutes of the April 10th meeting. 

Trustee Deely then opened the meeting to general discussioi 
on any subject pertaining to athletics, academic activities or 
student activities in general. He invited the students and staff 
members to participate freely and to bring up any views which they 
would like to have considered. 



Student 
Activities 



1614 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Miss Joslin said that she was pleased that the students 
have this opportunity to get acquainted with the Trustees and to 
learn of their views at first hand. She said that she feels a need 
for improvement of the athletic facilities for women students. 
The building which they use now is entirely inadequate and anti- 
quated. There is not room enough for required classes in Physical 
Education and there are very few indoor facilities for recreational 
athletics. 

It was pointed out that Physical Education is required 
for all freshman and sophomore women. Miss Totman, Head of the De- 
partment, has been surveying the campus to find additional facilities 
this year, and the problem may be worse next year with more women 
students expected. 

President Van Meter said that the next two buildings to 
be constructed will probably be a Dining Hall and a Public Health 
Building but that after these are completed the new building for 
Physical Education for Women should have priority. 

Professor McGuirk said that outdoor recreation opportu- 
nities for women students are reasonably good - there are adequate 
soccer, softball and archery fields. Tennis courts, however, are 
restricted to 8 in number for the whole University. At least 4- 
more are needed immediately. 

Miss Hinds said that a number of junior snd senior women 
would like to take additional indoor physical education but feel 
that there is no room for them because of the required courses for 
freshmen and sophomores. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Allan and Professor McGuirk urged that when the new 
building for women is constructed, provision be made for adequate 
play fields and facilities for outdoor physical education adjoining 
the building. The new building should also include a swimming pool 

Mrs. Leach raised question as to whether women students 
are represented on the Athletic Council. Registrar Lanphear 
pointed out that the Athletic Council was organized for the purpose 
of general supervision of inter-collegiate athletics. However, 
the student body as a whole is represented on the Council in that 
the student Senate has the power to appoint one of its members to 
the Council. This member could be either a man or a women student 

Mrs. Leach inquired as to whether there was a board 
similar to the Athletic Council which supervises intramural sports 
and activities and whether this council had representation from 
the women students. Professor McGuirk said that the Department of 
Physical Education for Women does have an advisory council on intra 
mural activities and women students are represented on this 

r 

council. 

In answer to a question from Mr. Deely, Mr. McGuirk said 
that women students seem to participate more in ron-intercollegiate 
athletics than do the men students in general. He felt that there 
is real need for expanding athletic and recreational opportunities 
for the women. 

Miss Hinds said that some of the women students would 
like to have credit toward their degree for participation in 
athletics. Professor McGuirk urged the value of having these pro- 
grams conducted on the basis of voluntary participation, to be 
enjoyed for themselves and to assist the students in acquiring 



1616 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

skills which they can use in later life. 

registrar Lanphear said that the University had expected 
to enroll a freshman class in 1951 of 1,000 - 600 men and 4-00 women 
Last year the University enrolled 800 freshmen - 500 men and 300 
women. It looks now, he said, that less than 1,000 freshmen will 
be enrolled. He is. receiving fewer applies. tions than last year and 
expects more withdrawals. It may be that the freshman enrollment 
will be approximately 900, made up of 350 women and 550 men. 

Dean Machmer suggested that the University needs a good 
auditorium for staging of plays and other activities. He said 
that the play BRIGAD00N had to be offered on four different nights 
to accommodate the audience. There is no meeting place large 
enough for the students to come together. 

Miss O'Donnell spoke of the serious handicaps under 
which members of the Bolster Doisters work in producing plays. She 
said that the Bowker Auditorium is so heavily scheduled by 
different groups night after night that there is little time for 
rehearsal. There is no place back stage to change costumes, no 
place for players not on the stage to wait for cues, and no place 
to keep properties. Players who exit from one side of the stage 
and re-appear on the other have to go outdoors to make the 
transition. During the staging of BRIGAD00N it rained three nights 
to the detriment of costumes and make-up. She said there is no 
place to store scenery and much valuable scenery has to be destroyed 
after the production of a play. Stage sets cannot be built in 
position as the stage is constantly used for other purposes. They 
have to be constructed on the fourth floor of Stockbridge Hall and 
lowered piece by piece on pulleys. 



OMMITTEE 



I 



1817 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Allan suggested that it was important to the 
University's relations with the public that public performances 
be of the best possible quality. He suggested that the Alumni 
should be interested in helping the University recruit outstanding 
students from the high schools. 

Chairman Deely pointed to recent issue of the Amherst 
College Alumni Bulletin calling attention to the visitation of 
college officials to Alumni groups throughout the county to in- 
terest these groups in recruiting outstanding students for Amherst. 
He said that the job of the University in this respect should be 
easier in that it can confine its efforts to Massachusetts. He 
urged consideration of the idea that each county should be visited 
at least once in two years, that the Alumni should be brought to- 



gether on these occasions and also the public officials and Trustees 
from each county. By this means, he felt that more interest could 
be aroused among the Alumni in helping the University bring its 
opportunities to the attention of outstanding high school students , 

Professor Dickinson spoke of the very favorable impression 
which student groups make on the public. He said that he had 
traveled for many years with athletic teams, with the chorale and 
other student groups and that they invariably make an excellent 
impression wherever they go. He said there would be real public 
relations value to the University in seeing that student groups 
have the opportunity to go out more often to meet the people. 

Mrs. Leach supported Professor Dickinson's statement. 
She said that when the Women's Advisory Council of the University 
was working some years ago to arouse interest in the need for a 



1010 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Home Economics Building, groups of girls from the University- 
appeared at meetings in Pittsfield, Amherst and Worcester and 
made excellent impressions on all those attending the meetings. 

Mr. Roberts said that he had received a letter from an 
alumnus who expressed the opinion that the University was not 
getting the "cream of the crop" in new students, that other colleges 
were getting the best. Dean Mac hner said that this statement 
cannot be borne out in any rating which the University has or in 
any rating of the students on the basis of tests. Dean Machmer 
urged the viewpoint that the University does not want to recruit 
specialists to star in the various activities but rather that these 
activities should be open for the training and development of any 
interested students. 

Mr. Ratner said that if the University feels that it can 
recruit good students through the Alumni, it must begin by selling 
the present student body on the value and importance of the 
University. These students will become Alumni and will be in- 
terested or not interested, depending on their student experience. 
He said he felt the present student body is apathetic and lacking 
in school spirit. 

Mr. Deely said that he felt that President Van Meter was 
taking every step toward meeting this problem and that his 
suggestion of the new trustee committee is an example of his effort 
to interest students in the general welfare of the University. 

Mr. Allan said that the student Senate has recently 
sponsored a program by means of which members of the athletic de- 
partment and of the University administration have been visiting 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



freshmen in their dormitories to talk to them about the University. 

Mr. Deely said that better public relations is not a job 
for any one group - that it is up to the students to sell students, 
the Alumni to sell Alumni, and that all can and should work to- 
gether in developing a coordinated program. 

Mr. Stanne said that in his opinion there is serious need 
for a meeting place so that students can come together more often 
as a means of fostering school spirit. He said that the University 
auditorium as well as the facilities for physical education for 
women do not meet even secondary school standards in the state of 
Connecticut. 

Chairman Bartlett suggested that Alumni can be kept more 
interested if they are given a definite job to do. He cited the 
policy at Dartmouth College of having an alumni committee in each 
community. These committees interview every candidate for the 
freshman class. 

Mr. Brown said that when he attended the University, it 
was much smaller and students and faculty were well acquainted with 
each other and developed friendly relationships. He said he thought 
the present student body should do more to get acquainted with each 
other and to learn to work together. 

Mrs. Leach said that she welcomes the new committee as a 
wonderful opportunity for the Trustees to meet the students. She 
pointed out that whatever the Trustees do is for the benefit of 
students but that there has been little opportunity in the past for 
them to meet face to face. 



1619 



1620 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Van Meter pointed out that care should be 
exercised in thinking that all problems of the University are 
financial. The problem of interested Alumni and spirited students 
is not one that can be solved by financial means. Spirit is an 
intangible thing and we must keep alert to find the ways to 



foster it. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:4-5 P.M. 




Secretary 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIHUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE OK BUILDINGS MD GROUNDS 
April 20, 1951, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 



Chairman Vhitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Taber, President 

Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, Mr. Maloney 
and Mr. Tessier, architects, Mr. Brehm, 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 
Professors Otto and Blundell, Secretary 
Burke 

Mr. Maloney and Mr. Tessier presented plans for the new 
Dining Hall. The building contains approximately 500,000 cubic 
feet and is 144 x 160 feet overall. It contains three dining halls 
of 250 seating capacity each, a snack bar and other rooms which 
would permit the service of 2,000 persons at one time if all 
capacity of the building were used. The Trustees asked numerous 
questions and the architects supplied detailed information concern- 
ing the building plans. After discussion and thorough inspection 
of the plans, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

architects' plans as submitted and authorize 
the President and Treasurer to proceed toward 
the eventual construction of the building. 

The present appropriation of $600,000 is insufficient to 
build the building and a request for an additional $265,000 has 
been included in the capital outlay budget for next year. 

The group with the exception of the architects adjourned 
to Draper Hall for luncheon. Treasurer Hawley reported that the 
University has an appropriation of $90,000 for the construction of 
an Animal Disease Isolation Building to be used in connection with 
the newly constructed Animal Pathology Building. This amount is 



621 



Dining 
Commons 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1622 



COMMITTEE 



Traffic 
Lights 



Sidewalk 



Turbine House 
addition 



Service 
Lines 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

insufficient to construct the building and it is hoped that the 
Public Building Commission will provide $20,009 more for its com- 



pletion. 



The Treasurer reported that he has been negotiating with 



the Town Selectmen and the Public Works Department for traffic 

lights on the campus and for the construction of a sidewalk from 

the south entrance of the University to Phillips Street. The Town 

of Amherst has agreed to put street lights along route 116 through 

the campus. The Public Works Department has agreed to put in 

traffic lights and construct the sidewalk. The University is 

supposed to provide $10,000 necessary for land taking so that the 

sidewalk may be built. Request has been submitted to the Budget 

Commissioner for appropriation of this amount. 

Mr. Brehm reported that the new Power Plant is entirely 

completed and is gradually being put into use. By May 1 the old 

plant will be entirely shut down and the new plant will have taken 

over the load. He said that the new generator has been delivered 

to the campus but is not yet installed. He showed plans for the 

installation of the generator and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the outline plan for Turbine House addi- 
tion and authorize the President and 
Treasurer to approve the detail plans 
based on this outline. 

Mr. Brehm also showed sketches of proposed new service 
lines to be constructed on the campus. These included an enlarge- 
ment of electrical, steam and sewage plans to some areas where new 
buildings are creating heavier utility demands. 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Brehm reported that the maintenance department is 
termite proofing Abigail Adams House. Contract has been let for 
rebuilding the termite damaged Homestead and the work is progress- 



ing. 



No satisfactory bid was received for reconstruction of 



the Cage roof of the Physical Education Building and the job is 

being readvertised. 

The Trustees then visited the site of the proposed new 

dining hall and inspected the area in the immediate vicinity of 

Marshall Hall with a view toward locating the new Public Health 

Building. After inspection and discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve a site 
along Stockbridge Road to the north and west 
of Marshall Hall for the new Public Health 
Building. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 o'clock. 



-^ 




^^^^>^- 



_Secretary 



1623 



Abigail 

Adams 

House 



Cage roof - 
reconstruction 



Public Health 
Building - 
location 



1624 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



i 









OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 






May 10, 1951 



The undersigned waives notice of the time 
and place of a meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
to be held in Chairman Bartlett's office, 49 Federal 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, May 8, 1951 
at 3:00 P.M. 



Signed_ 




4- ^^A^u-i^ 




OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 






May 10, 1951 



The undersigned waives notice of the time 
and place of a meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts to be held in Chairman Bartlett's office, 
4.9 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, 
May 8, 1951 at 3:00 P.M. 




Si gne d PC tPc-t, oc^ c C 



V. GLAAsXsi^A^C/ Ca^>/ 





OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 








t&kUtcAtJj^/^i 



<S$b/ine/&/ 



May 10, 1951 



I 



The undersigned waives notice of the time 

and place of a meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
to be held in Chairman Bartlett's office, A9 Federal 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, May 8, 1951 
at 3:00 P.M. 



Signed 



(fo^JL, mt£ c^jtu^ 







OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



May 10, 1951 



The undersigned valves notice of -the time 
and place of a meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the BBfcrd of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts to be held in Chairman Bartlett*© office* 
/ 4 ,9 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, 
May B f 1951 at 3*00 P.M. 



Signed 



*.■■■»■— n — t u t/ mm » 'n.M.n.» i m i mmmSmmk wn ■ ■ n wwwwi 




^^ eW^T^/Z^^ 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



U#i6veKi//4 




/zJiU^^ 



'^A^€i//i" 



<S^fmAexi/ 



May 3.0, 1?*1 



The undersigned waives notice of the time 

and place of ft meeting of the Executive Comittee of 

•:»;«< Bo^rii of Trustees of the feiv^ :ity of Massachusetts 
to bo hela in Chr.iiiu^.n B^-tlett's off lea, 49 $&&$£«& 
Street, Bostoa, Massachusetts,, on Tuesday, May 8, 1951 
at 3 i 00 P.M. 



Signe d {LxJ-yQ f. LP ' UaUsu* *^ 



3MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 3, 1951, 3.:00 P.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
4.9 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Carmichael, 

Mrs. Leach, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



There was discussion of the list of architects approved 

by the Executive Committee on November 29 , 1950 for planning of 

the proposed Public Health Building. After discussion, it was 

VOT ED; To authorize the Chairman of the Executive 
Committee to submit a letter to the Massa- 
chusetts Public Buildings Commission indica- 
ting that the Committee has no intention of 
changing its formal action of November 29, 1950. 
In the opinion of the Executive Committee, the 
University would not be harmed if any one of 
the three architects listed in the vote of 
November 29 were chosen. The disapproval of 
the first on the list can only be made by the 
Public Buildings Commission, thus overruling 
the action of the constituted authorities of 
the University of Massachusetts. The Executive 
Committee is not agreeable to such a disapproval. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5 o'clock. 



1625 



Public Health 
Building 



Secretary 




1626 



COMMITTEE 



Veterans Ad- 
ministration 
contract 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst , Mass. 

June 29, 1951 

Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated June 19, 1951 from 

Treasurer Hawley to the Executive Committee of the Board of 

Trustees, University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail 

ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

June 19, 1951 

Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

We have just been notified by the Boston Office of the 
Veterans Administration that our contracts for Veterans' Training 
for the years 1950-51 and 1951-52 are about ready for signature. 
Due to proposed reorganization of the Boston Office of the 
Veterans Administration, they are eager to have these contracts 
completed before the end of this month. Otherwise, it may be 
necessary to transfer negotiations to the New lork Office which 
might well involve long delay. We have been working on these 
contracts since last November and feel that it is important that 
they be completed without delay. 

Accordingly, Dr. Bartlett has authorized me to request 
authorization of the Executive Committee, by mail poll, to sign 
these contracts as follows: 

1. Advance Fund Contract 1950-51 - This is merely an 
authorization to us to collect up to 75$ of the amount claimed 
prior to completion of the final contract. 

2. Contract for 1950-51 - This contract provides for 
payment of tuition for veterans at the rate of $12.13 per credit 
hour which will yield an average tuition rate of $391* 70. 

3. Contract for 1951-52 - This provides for payment 
of veterans' tuition at the regular out-of-state rate of $4-00. 



1627 



OMM1TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Since the 19-48-49 contract, we have been required to 
write our contracts for tuition payment on the basis of so-called 
cost of instruction. Last year's contract was at the rate of 
$10.83 per credit hour or annual rate of $363.82. With rising 
costs, we will again be back at the $4-00 rate next year. 

These contracts have had to be prepared to conform with 
the Veterans Administration regulations. I believe they are as 
satisfactory as can be achieved for the University under these 
regulations and hereby request the approval of the Trustee 
Executive Committee to execute them for the University. 

A mail ballot form is enclosed for your consideration 
and action. Its prompt return will be appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. H a wley 
Treasurer 



MAIL .BALLOT 

In accordance with the explanation in the Treasurer's 

letter of June 19 } I hereby record my vote as follows on matters 

pertaining to Veterans' Administration Contracts. 

1. That the Treasurer be authorized to sign con- 
tracts with the Veterans Administration in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees as follows: 

a. Advance Payment Contract 1950-51 

b. Veterans' Training Contract 1950-51 

c. Veterans' Training Contract 1951-52 



Approved X_ 



Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Lottie A. Leach 
R. A. Van M e ter 




Secretary 



1628 



COMMITTEE 



Public Health 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

- . 

Amherst, Mass. 

June 29, 1951 

Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated June 14., 1951 from Treasurer 
Hawley to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, 
University of Massachusetts, the attached letter to the Massa- 
chusetts Public Building Commission, the attached letter from the 
Massachusetts Public Building Commission, and the resultant mail 
ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

June U, 1951 



Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The Massachusetts Public Building Commission have 
approved the appointment of the firm of M. A. Dyer Company, of 
Boston, as architects for the design of the proposed Public Health 
Building, copy of the letter of approval is attached. This action 
follows decision of the Trustee Executive Committee with which you 
are familiar and which are summarized in Dr. Bartlett ! s letter to 
the Building Commission, dated May 9, copy of which also is en- 
closed. 

The next step, according to normal procedure, is for the 
Treasurer to negotiate a contract with the M. a. Dyer Company for 
the services required in accordance with the approval of the 
Public Building Commission. Before undertaking this, I should 
have specific Trustee authority. Dr. Bartlett and President 
Van Meter have agreed that this authority may be requested from 
the Executive Committee by mail ballot. 

Accordingly, ballot and return envelope are enclosed for 
your consideration and action. 

Very truly yours, 

/&/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 
RDH/GHP 

Ene. 



1 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



May 9, 1951 



Massachusetts Public Building Commission 
20 Somerset Street 
Boston 8, Massachusetts 

Attention: Mr. Hall Nichols, Secretary and 

Chief Engineer 

Gentlemen: 

It is my recollection that the Legislature directed the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts to erect, or cause 
to be erected, a public health building for the use of both the 
State Public Health Department and the University. It is also 
my recollection that J^2% of the cost is to be paid by the Federal 
Government. Our Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds re- 
ceived information having to do vith twenty-five possible archi- 
tects to do the architectural work. The Committee canvassed the 
situation and voted for three architects and named their choice 
in 1, 2, 3 order. 

This committee reported to the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees. The Executive Committee reviewed the 
matter anew and accepted the report of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee and formally notified your Commission of their choice. 
Yesterday the Executive Committee, at the request of President 
Van Meter, met and reviewed the situation again. The Executive 
Committee is satisfied with the three named for architects and 
in the order that they were presented to your Commission. All 
three architectural firms are competent in our opinion and can 
do this work properly. One of the advantages of the first-named 
architect is that he comes from the western part of the state 
and not much architectural service has been asked for from that 
part of the state in our building program. 

If it is your province to pick out any one of the 
three architects, in our opinion any one is competent to do the 
work. I understand that you have the power of approval or non- 
approval. We know of no reason why the first architect listed 
should not be approved. If you want to disapprove of our first 
choice, that is your privilege. The University will not be 
harmed if any one of the three is chosen, but the Board of 
Trustees, through its appropriate committees, is not prepared 
to change its original recommendations. 

Yours truly, 

/s/ Joseph W. Bartlett 
Chairman, Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



62 



1630 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



June 6, 1951 



Re: Mass. State Project U-301R 
Public Health Building 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst 

Mr. Robert D. Hawley, Treasurer 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Havley: 

The Commission has given most careful consideration to 
the selection of an architect for the above project, as submitted 
for approval by your letter of April 23 > 1951* The Commission 
has also given very careful consideration to the letter of May 9th 
from Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, re- 
garding the three names submitted, in which he states that all 
three firms are considered competent to do the work properly and 
that the number one choice of the Trustees is still James A. 
Britton of Greenfield, Massachusetts. 

This Public Health Building is in part to be a health 
center. This is a new type of building, regarding which there 
appears to be very little precedent in this Commonwealth, so far 
as the Commission has been able to determine. It understands 
that only one health center has been fully planned in this State 
and that is the one in Quincy. The architects of that building 
were the M. A. Dyer Company of Boston, and the Commission feels 
that they have, therefore, acquired special knowledge pertinent 
to this project, which is not possessed by the other firms 
named in your recommendations. 

The Commission has, therefore, VOTED that it will 
approve your number two recommendation, M. A. Dyer Company of 
Boston, as architects for the design only of the above project, 
inasmuch as no funds are presently available for construction. 
This approval is, of course, subject to reaching satisfactory 
terms for compensation, which it is suggested be on a per- 
centage basis, but which must be limited to a maximum fee not 
to exceed the advance of $39,000.00 from the federal government. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ Hall Nichols 
Director and Chief Engineer 
Massachusetts Public Building Commission 
20 Somerset Street, Boston 3 



! 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAI L BALLOT 
Executive Committee - Board of Trustees 

In accordance with the information in the Treasurer's 

letter of June 14-, 1951> I hereby approve _X or do not 

approve that the Treasurer be authorized to execute a con- 
tract with the M. A. Dyer Company for architectural services for 
the design of the Public Health Building in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees. 



Signed: Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
Lottie A. Leach 
A. C. Brett 
Philip F. "Whitmore 
R. A. Van Meter 




Secretary 



1632 



COMMITTEE 



Metal 

Storage 

Buildings 



Dish Washing 
Machine 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
June 27, 1951, 5:00 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Whitmore, Brett, 
Hubbard, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



presided. 



In the absence of Trustee Haigis, Chairman Bartlett 



Treasurer Havley said that the University has an oppor- 



tunity to acquire two metal storage buildings from the Common- 
wealth as result of the discontinuance of certain farming activi- 
ties at State Hospitals. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to sign contract in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees with Aquadro & 
Cerruti in the amount of $9,617.68 covering 
dismantling of two storage buildings at 
Lakeville, moving them and re-erecting them 
on the campus at Amherst. 

It was also 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the placement of one of these buildings 
on the athletic field and the other in 
the ravine. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the dish washing machine 

at Greenough dormitory has broken down. This machine was surplus 

government property and has never been satisfactory. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the Treasurer to sign contract in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees with 
Morandi-Proctor Co., Inc. in the amount of 
$6,44-9 for furnishing and installing a dish 
washer and other equipment in the kitchen 
of Greenough dormitory. 



:OMMlTTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the University has an 
appropriation of Sl35,000 for the construction of an addition 
to the Turbine House and purchase of a 1500 K.¥. turbine. Pre- 
liminary plans were reported to the Board of Trustees on May 1 
and approved. This is a very urgent project since present 
electric power capacity is inadequate to meet the increased 
demands expected next winter. The 1500 K.V. turbine has been 
purchased and delivered. Bids have been received for the con- 
struction of the Turbine House. The low bid exceeds the amount 
of funds available by approximately $80,000. Application has 
been made for a transfer of reserve funds to make possible the 
award of a contract and we believe this is being considered 
favorably. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the Treasurer to sign contract in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees with Daniel 
0'Connell's Sons Inc. for the construction 
of a Turbine House addition in the amount 
of approximately $190,563.4.5 providing 
sufficient funds are made available. 

In connection with a proposed grant of §600 from the 

American Cyanamid Company, there was discussion of patent policy 

for the University in connection with research grants which may 

result in the discovery of patentable processes. It was 

' VOTED: To refer this matter to the Executive 
Committee. 

For Chairman Haigis, Treasurer Hawley presented a re- 
port regarding endowment and trust funds of the University. Copy 
of this report is appended to these minutes. It was 

VOTED : To receive and present the report to the 
Board of Trustees. 



1633 



Turbine 
House 



American 
Cyanamid 

Company 

Fund 



Endowment 
Fur 



1634 



COMMITTEE 



Sigma 
Alpha 
Epsilon 
loan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee discussed the investment of endowment 

funds as listed on page 12 of the report. It was felt that the 

amount of $42,94-6.16 invested in the Amherst Savings Bank should 

be reduced considerably. The Trustees' Agent, The First National 

Bank of Amherst has recommended sale of the $3000 Penn. R.R. bonds 

held. Request has been received from the Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Fraternity for a first mortgage loan of f 20, 000 on their house 

on Sunset Avenue, Amherst. The Trustees' Agent has suggested the 

purchase of short term railroad equipment trust certificates. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees empower 
Trustees Bartlett, Vhitmore and Haigis 
and Treasurer Hawley to investigate the 
desirability of loaning $20,000 at 1$ 
interest on first mortgage of the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon house and to make the loan if it 
seems desirable to the group. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the Treasurer to withdraw |20,000 from the 
Amherst Savings Bank to provide funds for 
the fraternity mortgage loan if the loan 
seemed desirable. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:30 P.M. 




__Secretary 



I 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 30, 1951, 10:15 A.M., Office of Chairman Bartlett 
IB Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT ; Trustee Bartlett, Chairman: Trustees 
Brett, Vhitmore, President Van Meter., 
and Treasurer Hawley 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it vas 

VOTED : To authorize a fee of $236.50 for all students 
enrolled in the 12-week courses in Public 
Health conducted by the New England Field 
Training Center at the University; said fee 
to cover board for 5 days per week, tuition 
and room-rent, and to be effective beginning 
September 1, 1951. 

The Treasurer presented a report on expenditures from un- 

earmarked Endowment Funds as authorized by the Trustees for the 

fiscal year 1951 and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to expend not to 
exceed $1,000 from the income of unearmarked 
Endowment Funds during the fiscal year 1951-52. 

Progress on plans for the construction of the Mew Board- 
ing Hall was reported and it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract in 
the name of and for the Board of Trustees for 
the construction of the Dining Hall (State 
Project U-304) provided sufficient funds are 
available. 

The Treasurer explained the need for increasing the esti- 
mates on two projects included in the Capital Outlay Budget of the 
University for the current fiscal year. One, is the Reconstruction 
of Paige Laboratory which was originally estimated at .*15,000 and 
this figure is used in the budget. Increased costs and some change 
in plans indicate from a recent estimate of the cost of the work to 
be done that this figure should be increased to S30,000. It was 



1635 



Public 
Health 
courses 



Endowment 
Funds 



Dining 
Commons 



Paige 
Laboratory 



1636 



1 



COMMITTEE 



Public 
Health 
Center 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to request an 
increase in the item for Peconstruction 
of Paige Laboratory from $15,000 to 
130,000. 

The estimate carried in the University Budget for the 
State's share of the cost of the proposed Public Health Center is 
$500,000. The architect has prepared preliminary plans based 
upon the needs of the State Department of Public Health, Federal 
Health Service and the University which indicate that this is in- 
adequate to meet these needs. This project, too, is affected by 
increased construction costs and also by the fact that whereas the 
Federal Government's contribution to this project is 1*2%, recent 
actions by the Government Agency has limited the total Federal 
contribution to $250,000. Accordingly, it was 

VOTE D: To authorize the Treasurer to request that 
the estimate for the project for Public 
Health Center be increased from $500,000 
to a sum not to exceed $1,000,000, provided 
the Committee on Plans, appointed by Presi- 
dent Van iVl eter, agrees that this additional 
amount is essential. 

A proposed Supplementary Budget Request for the Fiscal 

Year 1952 was mailed to members of the committee one week prior to 

the meeting. Following consideration, it was 

VOTED : To approve the Supplementary Budget for 
1952 totaling $69,400. 

The Treasurer explained that the recent action by the 
Legislature in granting cost-of-living salary increase to State 
employees in the amount of $360 per person affects the budget 
estimate for the University for the 1953 fiscal year as previously 
approved by the Board of Trustees. This salary increase, which 
will affect all employees, is estimated to increase the cost of 
oueration for the University by the amount $398,000. It was 



I 



COMMITTEE 



o i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to increase the 
budget of the University for 1953 by the 
amount of $>393,000 over that amount pre- 
viously approved by the Trustees due to 
legislative salary increase of $360 per 
person. 

The Treasurer reported upon the receipt of the assets of 
the Ascension Farm School, Inc., which have been transferred by 
court order to the Trustees of the University) the principal to be 
kept invested and the income to be used for the education and train- 
ing in agriculture of boys resident in Western Massachusetts. It 
was 



VOTE D; To authorize the President to use the income 
of the Ascension Farm School Fund for the 
purposes specified in the court order. 

The President reported upon the action of the Legislature 

in authorizing scholarship grants in the total amount of $25>000. 

According to the law, these grants are to be made by a Scholarship 

Committee appointed by the Trustees. Accordingly, upon the 

recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTE D: To appoint the following Committee to select 
the candidates for the State Scholarship 
Awards: Dean Machmer, Chairman; Dean Hopkins, 
Dean Curtis, Registrar Lanphear and Treasurer 
Hawley. 

The Chairman announced that all actions of the Committee, 

as recorded above, were unanimous. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:00 M. 



Ascension 
Farm School 



Scholarship 
Funds 



State 

Scholarship 

Awards 



COMMITTEE 



Hogan, Mrs, 
Gerald - 
hearing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 15, 1951, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman Eartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Vhitmore, 
President Van Meter, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED: 



To dispense with reading of the call 
and reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

Mrs. Gerald Hogan, formerly Miss Tarantino, a teacher 
in the English Department, had requested that she be allowed to 
come before the Trustees in reference to charges resulting in her 
dismissal by the President from her position as Instructor at the 
University. She had requested that she be represented by counsel 
and that a stenographer be present at any hearing that the 
Trustees would grant her. Accordingly, Mrs. Hogan, with her 
counsel, Edward L. O'Brien of Northampton, was requested to appear 
before the Executive Committee. Professor Frank Prentice Band, 
whose charges resulted in Mrs. Hogan' s dismissal, was also re- 
quested by the Trustees to be present. Mrs. Marjorie S. Arsenault, 
a steno typist, was present in accordance with Mrs. Hogan' s request. 

Professor Band was called by the Trustees to give 
testimony in reference to the charges that he had preferred 
against Mrs. Hogan. He was put under oath and testified. He was 
questioned by the chairman of the committee and questions were 
also asked by other members of the committee. Mr. O'Brien, 
Mrs. Hogan' s counsel, also cross-examined Professor Band. Written 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

communications and college records, furnished by Professor Rand in 
reference to Mrs. Hogan 1 s employment, were also made part of the 
record. 

At the close of his testimony, Mrs. Gerald Hogan was 
called as a witness by her attorney and, after having been put 
upon her oath, testified as to her record and her work at the 
University. Mrs. Hogan was asked questions by the chairman and by 
members of the committee. 

The hearing was closed and the committee met in closed 

session. After discussion by the committee, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To dismiss the charges against Mrs. Hogan 
as preferred by Professor Rand and the 
President was requested to notify Mrs. Hogan 
of her reinstatement in her position with 
the University. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To approve sabbatical leave for May E. Foley, 
Extension Professor of Nutrition, for 14. 
weeks so that she might complete the study 
program outlined in her memorandum of 
September 13, 1951 to Director Dayton and 
as approved by Director Dayton. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To approve award of a $2,000 Lotta M. 
Crabtree fellowship to Philip J. Spear 
beginning October 1, 1951- Mr. Spear is 
a candidate for the Doctors degree in 
Entomology at the University of Massachusetts. 

President Van Meter said that the Shade Tree Laboratories 
at the University are receiving occasional requests from out-of- 
state to test samples of elms for the Dutch Elm Disease. He 

suggested that a fee should be fixed for this work. After 

- 
discussion, it was 



1639 



Foley, May E. 

sabbatical 

leave 



Lotta M. Crab- 
tree - fellow- 
ship 



Dutch Elm 
Disease 



1640 



COMMITTEE 



Extension 
courses - 

tuition rate 



Gift of land 



Cadwell, Mrs, 
Frank A. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the charging of $2.00 per 
sample for testing out-of-state Dutch 
Elm samples. 

Secretary Burke said that the Extension program at 

Pittsfield authorized previously by the Trustees has now begun 

and suggested that the Trustees fix a rate of tuition for this 

work. He said that the University is paying Instructors in this 

program at the rate of $125 per credit per semester plus travel 

and that there will be approximately 20 students in each of the 

two courses now underway. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve a tuition rate of $7.50 per 

credit per semester for in-state students 
who register for Extension courses 
offered by the University with the under- 
standing that this rate will be reviewed 
at the end of one year. 

There was discussion as to the possibility of out-of- 
state students registering for Extension courses and it was 
pointed out that out-of-state students on the campus pay ^20 per 
semester credit hour as against &5-00 for in-state students. It 
was 

VOTED : That if out-of-state students register 

for Extension courses, their rate should 
be $30 per credit hour per semester. 

President Van Meter said that Mrs. Frank A. Cadwell has 

offered to present approximately 1200 acres of forest land in the 

town of Pelham to the University. The Trustees called in 

Professors Holdsworth and Rich of the Department of Forestry and 

discussed with them the possibilities of using this land. 

Professor Holdsworth, Head of the Department of Forestry, said 

that such acquisition would be of real importance to the Forestry 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department and that the land was very well suited for use as a 

laboratory in the teaching of Forestry. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To accept the gift of approximately 1200 
acres of land in the town of Pelham from 
Mrs. Frank A. Cadwell, said land, to be 
accepted by the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts for the Commonwealth free 
of taxes and for the use of the University. 

There was discussion of the possibility that members of 
the Legislature may wish the University to take over the Westfield 
State Teachers College development to be operated in the future 
as an integral part of the University on the campus at Amherst. 
The committee felt that the Trustees should not request that this 
be done but should be willing to expand the University facilities 
for elementary teacher training if the Legislature so desires. No 
formal vote was taken. 

The committee 

VOTED: To request Chairman Bartlett to name a 
delegate from the Board to the annual 
meeting of the Association of Land-Grant 
Colleges and Allied Institutions. This 
meeting takes place in Houston, Texas 
in October. Chairman Bartlett requested 
Trustee Whitmore to represent the 
Trustees at this meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4-* 10 P.M. 



•n /^ 




Secretary 



64 



1 



Westfield State 

Teachers 

College 



Assoc, of Land- 
Grant Colleges & 
Allied Institu- 
tions 

Trustee Whitmore 



I 



1642 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



September 26, 1951 



COMMITTEE 



ROTC 
Garage 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated September 19, 1951 from 

Treasurer Hawley to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the 

Board of Trustees, University of Massachusetts, and the resultant 

mail ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the 



Board. 



September 19, 1951 



To: Trustee Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds 

Gentlemen: 

The contract for the construction of an ROTC Garage 
at the Cavalry Stables, which was authorized by the Trustees 
last year, was completed to the satisfaction of the Architect, 
Alderman and MacNeish of Holyoke, and ourselves on June 5 last. 
Before final settlement is made with the contractor, we should 
have official approval by the Trustees of the acceptance of the 
building. The Chairman of the Trustee Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds, Mr. Vhitmore, has authorized me to write to the 
members of this committee requesting their vote by mail on the 
basis of the written evidence which I also submit herewith. 

Enclosed is copy of a statement by Mr. Brehm, Super- 
intendent of Buildings and Grounds, in support of our recommenda- 
tion that the building be officially accepted as of June 5> 1951- 

Your consideration of this matter will be" appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ R. D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



i 



1643 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAIL BALLOT 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Treasurer 
in his letter of September 19, 1951, I hereby vote: to accept the 
ROTC Garage at the Cavalry Stables as complete as of June 5, 1951 • 



Signed: yes - 



Joseph W. Bartlett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
A. C. Brett 
John W. Haigis 
Ralph F. Taber 
J. M. Deely 




Secretary 



1644 



COMMITTEE 



School of Agri- 
culture and 
Horticulture 



program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

September 27, 1951, 10:30 A.M., Amherst, Mass. 



Chairman Brett presiding 
PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Brown, Mrs. Leach, Director Sieling, 
Director Verbeck, Professor Bullis, Secretary Burke 
It was 

-VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Director Sieling spoke of consolidation by President 
Van Meter and the Trustees of all agricultural services of the 
University under one head. He said that the purpose of this con- 
solidation was to create a more efficient and uniform agricultural 
program. 

Director Sieling showed a chart of the new agricultural 
organization and Chairman Brett requested that copies of the 
chart be made available later to the committee. 

Director Verbeck described the work of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture, emphasizing that its major purpose is to 
provide highly specialized courses in various phases of Agri- 
culture and Horticulture. In addition to the basic fields, he 
said that the Stockbridge School at the present time has programs 
in Food Management for training hotel stewards and programs in 
commercial forestry, arboriculture and greenkeeping. The latter 
two courses are the only ones of their kind in the United States. 

The committee visited the recently completed Animal 
Pathology building where Dr. Bullis, Head of the Department of 
Veterinary Medicine, outlined the history of the department and 
cited the tremendous increases which have taken place in the 



A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

number of tests per year by the poultry disease control service. 

Much of the recent effort of the department has been de- 
voted to the discovery of methods for analyzing and controlling 
infectious diseases of poultry. Dr. Bullis spoke of the increased 
demands for service from the poultry industry which led to the 
construction of the new building and to the establishment of a 
branch laboratory at Waltham which was opened in October of 1950. 

Professor Van Roekel described the work being performed 
in the pullorum disease laboratory and outlined some of the progress 
in the development of controls for New Castle disease and other 
respiratory diseases of poultry. 

At noon time the committee was joined by the following 
department heads for a luncheon in Draper Hall: Fred P. Jeffrey, 
Head of the Poultry Department; James W. Dayton, Director of the 
Extension Service; Grant B. Snyder, Head of Olericulture; Robert 
P. Holdsworth, Head of Forestry; Clark L. Thayer, Head of Flori- 
culture; and H. Sidney Vaughan, State County Agent Leader. 

President Van Meter spoke on the place of Agriculture 
at the University. He said there are more students in Agriculture 
now than when the University was strictly an agricultural college. 



There is strong demand for trained agricultural scientists in food 
production and processing and in the foreign aid program of the 
United States. He said that recent advances in agricultural 
science have been tremendous and that the Land-Grant colleges are 
in the forefront of these advances. The President announced that 
the University is currently acquiring 1200 acres of forest land 
on Mt. Lincoln in Pelham. This will provide a larger field 



1646 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

laboratory for the Department of Forestry. 

Chairman Brett said that the agricultural industry is 
not static and that those in charge of this program at the Uni- 
versity must continue to think in terms of the future. He said 
that in his opinion agricultural marketing is one of the most 
difficult problems to solve but also one which demands our best 



efforts. 



After luncheon the group returned to the East Experiment 



Station where Director Sieling distributed copies of the attached 
statement entitled "Highlights of Massachusetts Agricultural Re- 



search". 



James W. Dayton, Director of the Extension Service, 



described the organisation of the Extension Service in Massachu- 
setts. Massachusetts is somewhat unique among the states in 
having county agricultural organizations as autonomous units. He 
said that this has worked very well in developing local initiative 
and responsibility. There is a total extension staff in Massa- 
chusetts of 189 workers - 74. at the state level and 115 in the 
counties. Of this total 64- are clerical and 125 are professional 
employees. 

Currently the Extension Service is working toward closer 
coordination of state and county programs. County workers are 
being given more opportunity to share in the planning of state 
programs. He said that in past years, the Extension Service has 
been largely concerned with agricultural production. Now the 
trend is toward agricultural marketing. This is a difficult 
problem as agricultural marketing is still in its infancy. 



1 



OMMITTEE 



fn 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trained workers are scarce or even unavailable. Another program 
which the Extension Service is beginning to undertake is education 
in public affairs. World events and national policies affect farm 
people and farm income even more than do those matters which the 
farmer can control himself. This is a difficult but important area 
of instruction. 

Chairman Brett re-emphasized the need for more work in 
agricultural marketing toward the goal of maintaining a healthy- 
economy based on small productive units. He suggested that 
cooperative organizations could play a larger part in New England 
agricultural marketing. He suggested that the University seek 
funds from private organizations for research in this field. 

Director Sieling said that one of the current problems 
among agricultural workers at the University is that of salaries. 
There is no pay differential at the present time between agri- 
cultural teachers who serve 9 or 10 months a year and agricultural 
research and extension workers who serve 11 months a year. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-5 P.M. 




^Secretary 



"X a 



7 



1648 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



HIGHLIGHTS OF MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 

The results of research at the Experiment Station have converted problems in- 
to dollars for the people of Massachusetts. Millions of dollars have been saved 
through new methods of disease control;, weed control, and food processing. Develop- 
ment of anew strain of White Plymouth Rock hens has brought thousands of dollars 
into New England. A startling and fundamental discovery in the field of agronomy 
is expected to contribute substantially in saving our valuable phosDhate supply. 

Five of the most outstanding contributions by the Experiment Station are out- 
lined below. The first four are original projects. 

1 
PREVENTION OF INFECTIOUS BRONCHITIS IN LAYING FLOCKS 

THREE TO SIX MILLION DOLLARS SAVED ANNUALLY 

Dr. VanRoekel of the Veterinary Medicine DeDartment with his staff has found 
a practical method to inoculate laying flocks against infectious bronchitis. Inocu- 
lated birds become actively immune to this dread disease throughout their laying 
period — - an economically important time for the poultrymen. 

By inoculating the birds at this time, poultrymen not only protect their flock 
but also save three to six million dollars a year. 

2 

WEED CONTROL IN CARROTS 

SIX AND A HALF MILLION DOLLARS SAVED ANNUALLY 

In the past much hand labor was necessary to control weeds in growing par- 
snips and carrots. Working in the field, Professor Lachman of the Olericulture De- 
partment discovered a new method of weeding carrots by spraying with a. chemical 
called Stoddard Solvent (cleaning fluid), which eliminates almost all the weeds 
from a carrot crop. 

This new method not only lessens cost and labor for control of weeds but also 
saves about $100 an acre annually or about $6,500,000. 

3 

FOOD PROCESSING 
ESTIMATED TO SAVE A HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS ANNUALLY 

Food technologists at the Station have found a new method to measure enzyme 
activity, the responsible agent for spoilage, loss of vitamins, and other valuable 
food qualities. This new method is already being applied in processing fruit juices 
and pickles. 

It has been estimated that the savings in food and the preservation of food 
quality may amount to $100,000,000 a year. 

4 
PHOSPHATE AVAILABILITY TO PLANTS 

SUBSTANTIAL SAVINGS ANTICIPATED 

When phosphate is added to the soil, it is fixed in such a form that it is not 
easily available to plants. Therefore, farmers are compelled to use large quanti- 
ties of phosphate fertilizer annually to maintain crop production. 



Through research at the Station, the chemical action involved in releasing 
these fixed phosphates is now understood, and it has been demonstrated that or- 
ganic matter, when added to acid soils, will free a considerable amount of this 
fixed phosphate. 



DEVELOPMENT OF A MEAT STRAIN IN WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

$250,000 TO $1,000,000 REALIZED ANNUALLY 

This is one of the few instances in which research men were able to anti- 
cipate a definite need of the poultry industry for a new strain of White Plymouth 
Rocks carrying the dominant white factor for plumage color, that is, the meat birds 
oroduced from this strain do not have any dark-colored pin feathers. 

Sales of such a desirable varietyhave amountedto$250,000 to $1,000,000 an- 
nually in New England alone. 

OTHER NOTEWORTHY CONTRIBUTIONS 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING AND ANIMAL HUSBANDRY - The use of dry- 
ing equipment to dry hay in the barn results in an initial higher quality, but after 
several months of storage, the hay is of no better quality than if it had been cured 
by the old method in the field. By using a drier, first-cutting hay may be harvested 
during the rainy June season. However, if this cutting is used for grass silage, 
the expense of a drier is unnecessary. 

AGRONOMY — Production of Havana Seed Tobacco has increased considerably in 
the Connecticut Valley by developing an improved plant resistant to black root 
rot. The cured leaf is also of better quality and higher type. 

BOTANY — The improved Bay State Tomato resistant to leaf mold has been 

developed. About 90 per cent of the fall crop of greenhouse tomatoes are of this 

variety. 

Several varieties of carnations with a high resistance to fusarium dianthi (the 

cause of carnation wilt disease) have also been developed. 

CHEMISTRY — The discovery that the feeding capacity of plants is associated 
with a plant root characteristic (cation exchange capacity) will probably lead to 
considerable improvement in the fertility practices and the growing of different 
plants in mixed stands. 

CRANBERRY STATION -» Practical methods for weed control in cranberry bogs 
have been found through the use of chemicals. 

DAIRY INDUSTRY — A new method of sanitizing teat cups between cows milked 
by using an extra milk header assembly greatly reduces the chance of spreading 
mastitis through a herd. 

OLERICULTURE — The Walth am Forcing Tomato has been developed and is now 
used almost exclusively by greenhouse growers because it is definitely adapted 
for winter growth in greenhouses. 

Two strains of broccoli have been developed. One strain is being used widely in 
the New Jersey, Washington, Oregon, and Virginia areas for commercial freezing. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY — Dr. Hays has developed a line of Rhode Island Reds 
almost entirely free of broody instincts. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE — A live virus vaccine for immunization of chickens 
against Newcastle disease has been developed. More recently, a vaccination com- 
bining the fowl pox and Newcastle vaccines has been developed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1 : * ti ■ - F& of , . ,, f 

' B ' . wMnwtti gg .-. r Tur £, 

49 F "'' ' ■.--..-.. 




*-v<^ J' 




• 



west of l-ia.i6iicLj.-L uaxx". Trustee aret/o ques oxuiieu on 



\^ £*,\JL fll llfc ■ i ■■* i 



of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 






, 









UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I hereby agree to vaire 7 days notice of the meeting of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts called to convene for Tuesday, 
October 2, 1951 at 11:00 A.M. at the office of Chairman Bartlett, 
49 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts* 




^ in I ■ ■ ll * l^ r i t i i i i i ■ i ii i llM i 



Signature 



west of i +VL j. tjucLj-x naxx". Trustee brett questioned one cuvj.. 



of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



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• . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1649 






■ 















V- 






~3-JK — 

T 




! 



west of ^u.^oiiu.a.x jLiaxj.". xrust.ee Brett, quesx-ionea uie auviwuiiiu,, 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1^/IK 









UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



■ / r 



I hereby 

Be 

... ' ; ' | " | 




vest of Maioiicix± nail". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1 a A « 



1 



I Uereby agree to waive 7 Say* n^ice of 'of 

, Commit'- i tattA - ounds of t& &o ij d of Trustees of 

tfaiversiW of .< ' -- ' ' ' ''" M ^» 

CM . ?> 1951 &1 ili&O t. at ihe office of Shi -lett, 




'.Ai^^u^^ 



west of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 






—J"--' 



..J '>j fi 






i - 
















\L ia^fc 



J 




west of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1 i 



■ s - ■ : : "' 




''"T-'V <-* I— iJACCJA^*! 



ICCTTC 



- ■■•- ■ u 

I fey 

■■■ 



ItAyt OL^t <A^ 





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I 



vest of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



Tj*ia* ©ft* So ased-axrcT lo JirxnoS 9i£f lo 9ed-d-±ciflio0 ©vitfuosx?: lo 



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3ttjd-££tsjt8 



1649 



I hereby agree to waive 7 ck,ys notice of the aieeting 
of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts callecj t convene for Tuesday, October 2, 1951 at 
3t00 P.M. at the office of Chairman Bartlett, 49 Federal Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 




Signature 



west of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



. 









■ 



<2<£^£V^ 






1649 



rTTC 



I hereby a i to waive ? kit . of the aaetia 

of Sxeoutire Coo d fctee 3f ■- of Tru of the Ifr&ven 

of tsetti call- bo convert .for Tu©a . October 2, 1951 at 

3tOC) P#M, at the office of 0halin blett, 49 f& I i©t f 

•ton 5 tehusetta* 



iL ffa ff- J-*^<A 



Signs ture 



vest of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 
of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 
would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 
Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 
discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
~ October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 

site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 
Isolation 

Building 



- 



. A 



«"» S7% 4 4~)t 



I hereby agree to waive 7 ■. ,, ->ice of the meeting of 

the Go-aaiitteo on Buildings aiu3 Grounds of t&e Bo*rd of Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts called to convene for Tuesday, 
Octob&v 2, 1951 at 11 j 00 *«H« at the office of Gffcaiiffl rtlett, 

federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts* 



^t/^^J>^ 



Signature 



Grounds Committee of the Board of Trustees located the site for the 

Public Health Building "along Stockbridge Road to the north and 

west of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



OMMITTEE 



I 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
October 2, 1951, 11:00 A.M., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston, Mass, 

Chairman Yhitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Whitmore, Bartlett, Erett, 

Taber, President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Mr. Dyer, Mr. Brown, Mr. Burley and Mr. Frost of the M. A 
Dyer Company were invited into the meeting to present preliminary 
sketches of the proposed Public Health Building. There was con- 
siderable discussion and the Trustees requested Mr. Dyer to prepare 
new sketches showing a pitched roof and a different architectural 
treatment. 

There was also considerable discussion of the proposed 

location of the building. On April 20, 1951 the Buildings and 

Grounds Committee of the Board of Trustees located the site for the 

Public Health Building "along Stockbridge Road to the north and 

west of Marshall Hall". Trustee Brett questioned the advisability 

of this location on the grounds that insufficient parking area 

would be available either for the Public Health Building or for the 

Dining Hall which is to be located in the same general area. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To meet on the campus at Amherst Saturday, 
October 20, at 10:30 A.M. to reconsider the 
site for the Public Health Building. It was 
requested that the architects prepare new 
sketches in time for this meeting. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that at a previous meeting, 

the Trustees had approved plans for the Animal Disease Isolation 

Building and these plans have since been approved by the Public 

Building Commission and are now out for bids. It is expected that 

the contract for this work will soon be ready for signing. After 



Public Health 
Center 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1650 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to execute contract in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees for 
cons traction of an Animal Disease Isolation 
Building provided that a bid is received 
within the amount available for construction 
of such building. 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley, it was 



unanimously 
VOTED: 



Physical Educa- 
tion Building - 
Skylight 



Steam Lines 



Water Mains 



To recommend that the Trustees accept as 
satisfactorily completed under the terms 
of the contracts, the three following con- 
struction projects: 

1. Repair of Skylight in the Physical 
Education Cage as of August 24, 1951 • 
These repairs were made by the E. 
Van Noorden Company at a cost of 
$28,770. 

2. Additions to the Steam Distribution 
System as of September 18, 1951 by 
the Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. at a 
cost of |291,550. 

3. Extension of Water Mains as of July 2, 
1951 by the Warner Brothers Construction 
Company at a cost of $22,039.33. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:45 P.M. 




Secretary 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
October 2, 1951, 2:20 P.M., Dr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Taber, President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Haigis reported that the bequest from the 
Ascension Farm Fund to the University has been received as of 
July 28, 1951 in an amount of approximately $105,000. The money 
is largely in stocks and the committee had requested a report from 
the First National Bank of Amherst concerning the investments of 
this fund. Treasurer Hawley read a letter from B. 0. Moody of the 
First National Bank of Amherst giving his views as to the invest- 
ments . 

Mr. Bartlett expressed the opinion that Section 7 of 

Chapter 75 of the General Laws of Massachusetts does not permit the 
Trustees of the University to invest funds as the Ascension Farm 
Fund had been invested. He suggested that the Trustees should se- 
lect approximately /£% of the stocks to be sold now and keep the re- 
maining appro ximately 60% until the Trustees can receive an opinion 
from the Attorney General as to their powers of investment. Should 
these powers prove to be as limited as would appear from Section 7 
of Chapter 75, the Trustees might seek authorization from the 
Legislature for broader power of investment. After discussion, 
it was unanimously 

VOTE D : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, John W. 
Haigis, and Treasurer, R. D. Hawley, to sell: 



1651 



Ascension 
Farm School 



1S5X 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Common Stocks 

50 Shs. Aetna Standard Engineering Co. 

30 Shs. Anaconda Copper Mining Co. 

50 Shs. Philip Carey Mfg. Co. 

60 Shs. Elgin National Vatch Co. 

20 Shs. First National Stores Inc. 

25 Shs. Florence Stove Co. 

30 Shs. Homestake Mining Co. 

50 Shs. Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis R.R. 

20 Shs. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 
1 Sh. Standard Oil Co. Ohio 

30 Shs. Southern Pacific Co. 
100 Shs. Twentieth Century Fox Film Co. 
232 Shs. United Merchants & Manufacturers Inc. 

11 Shs. 115 East 53rd St. Corp. N.Y.C. 



Preferred Stocks 
25 Shs. A. M. Byers Co. 1% cum. pfd. 
25 Shs. Cushman Sons Inc. 7% cum. pfd. 
25 Shs. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. 



Approx, 

Value 

$ 950 

1,440 

900 

780 

700 

600 

1,110 

3,550 

640 

44 
1,920 
2,100 

3,855 



2,675 
3,225 
2,275 



Bonds 
500 American Tel. & Tel. Co. conv. deb. 
5000 Gulf Mobile & Ohio R.R. 4 f s - 2044 
5000 Southern Pacific R.R. 4 l/2's - '69 



3 1/3 



59 



595 
3,300 
4,900 



h 470 



Brit ish Securiti es. 
. 10 War Stock 



L 300 3% Savings Bonds 1960-7 

L 104 . 4 • 2 3\% War Stock - Post-Off ice Issue 

210 Shs. Burnham, Dorney & Hitcham Waterworks 

Total British 1,900 

Total to be Sold $37,459 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees retain approxi- 
mately 60$ by value of the securities of the 
Ascension Farm Fund for future action for a 
period not exceeding six months and that the 
Trustees obtain an opinion from the Attorney 
General as to the rights and powers of the 
Board in fund investment. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It vas unanimously 

VOTE D: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, John V. 
Haigis, and Treasurer Hawley to invest 
$20,000 of the proceeds from the sale of the 
Ascension Farm securities in a l& mortgage of 
the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity as pre- 
viously authorized. 

This vote cancels vote of June 27, 1951 authorizing the 
Treasurer to -withdraw $20,000 from the Amherst Savings Bank tp 
provide funds for the fraternity mortgage loan. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, John ¥. 
Haigis, and Treasurer Hawley to invest approxi- 
mately $23,000 of the proceeds from the sale 
of the Ascension Farm securities in short-term 
Treasury Notes or Bills. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 : 15 P.M. 



16<53 



Sigma Alpha 

Epsilon 

Fraternity 



^ 




Secretary 



/6<5f 



COMMITTEE 



Sigma Alpha 

Epsilon 

Fraternity 



30 


Shs 


50 


Shs 


20 


Shs 


1 


Sh. 


30 


Shs 


100 


Shs 


282 


Shs 


11 


Shs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Homes take Mining Co. 1,110 
Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 

R.R. 3,550 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 640 

Standard Oil Co. Ohio 44 

Southern Pacific Co. 1,920 

Twentieth Century Fox Film Co. 2,100 
United Merchants & Manufacturers Inc. 3, 35 5 

115 East 53rd St. Corp. N.I.C. 

Preferred Stocks 

25 Shs. A. M. Byers Co. 1% cum. pfd. 2,675 

25 Shs. Cushman Sons Inc. 7% cum. pfd. 3,225 

25 Shs. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. 5% 2,275 

Bonds 
500 American Tel. & Tel. Co. conv. deb. 

3 1/8' s '59 595 

5000 Gulf Mobile & Ohio R.R. 4's - 2044 3,300 
5000 Southern Pacific R.R. 4 l/2's - '69 4,900 

British Securities 
L .470 . 3 . 10 War Stock 

L 300 3% Savings Bonds 1960-7 

h 104 • 4 • 2 3§5& War Stock - Post- 
Office Issue 

210 Shs. Burnham, Doraey & Hitcham Waterworks 



Total British 



1,300. 



Total to be Sold $37,459 



It was unanimously 



VOTED : To retain approximately 60^ by value of 

the securities of the Ascension Farm Fund 
for future action for a period not exceed- 
ing six months and that the Chairman of the 
Board seek an opinion from the Attorney 
General as to the interpretation of Section 7 
of Chapter 75 in such form as he deems 
desirable. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED: To authorize the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, John W. Haigis, and Treasurer 
Hawley to invest $20,000 of the proceeds from 
the sale of the Ascension Farm securities in 
a U% mortgage of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
fraternity as previously authorized. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This vote cancels vote of June 27, 1951 authorizing the 
Treasurer to withdraw $20,000 from the Amherst Savings Bank to pro- 
vide funds for the fraternity mortgage loan. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To authorize the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, John ¥. Haigis, and Treasurer 
Hawley to invest approximately $23,000 of 
the proceeds from the sale of the Ascension 
Farm securities in short-term Treasury 
Notes or Bills 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the campus has been faced 

with a considerable problem in traffic and parking control 

especially of student cars. He said that students fail to heed 

warnings from the Campus Police Officer and from the Dean's Office 

and that apparently no other course is left except to fine students 

for traffic and parking violations. He said that the University 

has adopted formal traffic and parking regulations for students 

and these regulations have been approved by the Student Council. 

However, the enforcement system is failing to work and the Dean of 

Men feels that it will not work until the regulations are backed 



by fines. 



Dr. Carmichael said that Tufts has been using a system 



of fines successfully for the past year and that it has cut down 

violations. Chairman Bartlett strongly opposed fining of students 

and thought that the University should adopt other measures of 

enforcement. After discussion, it was 

VOTE D; To approve the attached parking and traffic 
regulations for students at the University 
and to authorize the Treasurer to assess stu- 
dents who violate the published regulations 
$1.00 for the first violation and $5.00 for 
each subsecuent violation. 



/G6 5 



Ascension 
Farm School 



Traffic 
Regulations 



Parking 
Regulations 



/ 6 £ 



COMMITTEE 



Dempsey, Paul 
V. - Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Bartlett dissented in this vote. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To name Paul W. Dempsey Assistant Research 
Professor of Horticulture Emeritus. 

The meeting was adjourned at U'U^> P.M. 




Secretary 



University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 




TRAFFIC AND PARKING REGULATIONS 



September, 1950 



une vjwj.j_j.iio uj-cv uj. -.-. 



ad 

t 



following 
3ii : Raymond H. 
ore, Lyle L. 
s, Professor of 
f Buildings and 

reported that 
the Drill Hall 

from Wilder 
3n completed 
After 



as 

to 

by 

nount 



of $24,932. 
The committee gave its attention to reconsideration of 
the site for the proposed Public Health Building. A site along 
Stocfcbridge Road to the north and west of Marshall Hall had been 
approved by the committee under date of April 20, 1951 and accepted 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



Public 
Health 
Building 



' 



COMMITTEE 



Dempsey, Paul 
W. - Emeritus 



Chairman Ba] 



unanimously 
VOTED: 



The responsibility of all traffic and parking 
activities on the campus is vested in the Dean 
of Men. 

PURPOSE: The Traffic and Parking Regulations are 
made for the express purpose of implementing the 
safety and welfare of all members of the Univer- 
sity Community. Provisions for the ready access 
of all types of emergency vehicles to classroom 
buildings and dormitories are imperative; the use 
of automobiles by certain classes of students is 
considered detrimental to their academic develop- 
ment; campus roads are of insufficient capacity 
to handle safely the traffic which would be caused 
by students driving between classes. 

RESTRICTIONS: Beginning in 1950-51, freshmen 
residents will not be permitted to have automo- 
biles or other automotive vehicles on campus or 
in town. 

Beginning in 1951-52 neither freshmen nor sopho- 
more residents will be permitted to have automo- 
biles or other automotive vehicles on the campus 
or in town. 

Beginning in 1950-51 > no sophomore, junior or 
senior resident who is on any kind of probation 
will be permitted to have any automobile or other 
automotive vehicle on the campus or in town. 

No student will be permitted to drive his 
automobile about the campus between the hours of 
7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
and between 7:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon on Saturday, 
holidays excepted. 



A student who is disabled and wishes permis- 
sion to drive may apply to the University Health 
Officer for such authority. His certificate must 
be countersigned by the Dean of Men before the 
privilege can be granted. 



lot) ( 



1 



Parallel parking on roadsides is not permitted 
anywhere on the campus by anyone. 

PARKING AREAS: "South" (across from Physical 
Education Building) for 150 commuter automobiles 
on gravel area; 100 additional automobiles on 
grass area. 

"East" (across fromFernald Hall) for residents' 
automobiles (180) only. This is a "dead" area; 
no commuters. 

"North" (vicinity of Draper and Stockbridge 
Halls) for a limited number of commuters; re- 
mainder for staff. Separate areas to be marked 
off. Present capacity 75 automobiles. 

"Skinner" for staff automobiles and visitors. 
Capacity 80 automobiles. 

County Circle Residents park in existing areas 
adjacent to buildings„ 

Federal Circle Residents park in existing 
areas adjacent to buildings. No parking in road- 
ways. 

STAFF: Members of the University Staff park in 
areas most convenient to their buildings. 
No parking on roadsides. 



SPEED LIMIT: 



20 MPH. 



VIOLATIONS: Staff violations will be reported to 
the Dean's Office; students will be referred to the 
Student Traffic Court for appropriate action. 



R. A, Van Meter 
President 



I 



.owing 

Raymond H, 
, Lyle L. 
Professor of 
uildings and 
ported that 
i Drill Hall 
-ora Wilder 
completed 
ber 



o 

ut 

of 5^4 >^°^- 
The committee gave its attention to reconsideration of 

the site for the proposed Public Health Building. A site along 
Stockbridge Road to the north and west of Marshall Hall had been 
approved by the co^ittee under date of April 20, 1951 and accepted 



Electric 
Distribution 

System 



Public 

Health 
Building 



/ 666 



COMMITTEE 



Dempsey, Paul 
V. - Emeritus 



Chairman Bartl 



On 



unanimously 



VOTED : 1 
F 



Th 



fMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 20, 1951, 10:30 A.M., Wilder Hall 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Taber, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED: 



To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 



meeting. 



The members of the committee invited the following 

members of the University staff to attend the session: Raymond H. 

Otto, Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture, Lyle L. 

Blundell, Professor of Horticulture, Ralph L. France, Professor of 

Bacteriology, and George C. Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds. Treasurer Hawley and Superintendent Brehm reported that 

the underground electric distribution systems from the Drill Hall 

to the Athletic Field (approximately 1500 feet) and from Wilder 

Hall to Clark Hall (approximately 600 feet) have been completed 

and tested to the satisfaction of the University. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept as 
completed September 14, 1951 additions to 
the electric distribution system made by 
the Collins Electric Company in the amount 
of $24,932. 

The committee gave its attention to reconsideration of 

the site for the proposed Public Health Building. A site along 

Stockbridge Road to the north and west of Marshall Hall had been 

approved by the committee under date of April 20, 1951 and accepted 



Electric 

Distribution 

Svstem 



Public 

Health 
Building 



1658 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by the full Board under date of May 1, 1951* However, the 
committee wished to reconsider the site to be sure that both the 
Dining Commons and the Public Health Building could go into this 
general area, with adequate facilities for parking. Professors 
Otto and Blundell, representing the Campus Planning Council, 
favored the site as approved by the Trustees. They said this site 
keeps Public Health located near related sciences and near the 
Dining Commons. The site is easily accessible to the general 
public and there is sufficient room in this area for further de- 
velopment of nursing and pre-medical work. They pointed out that 
new parking facilities will be constructed in the rear of Hamlin 
and Knowlton Houses and these will also service the Public Health 
Building. Parking for 80 cars at the building, and for 100 cars 
at Skinner Hall are also available. 

The committee then visited the site which had been 
staked out by Professor Blundell, and after discussion agreed 
that sufficient parking would be available and that the site seems 
to be the most feasible of any under consideration. It was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To reaffirm the site along Stockbridge 
Road to the north and west of Marshall 
Hall for the new Public Health Building. 

The committee then invited Mr. Dyer, Mr. Brown, 
Mr. Burley and Mr. Frost of the architectural firm of M. A. Dyer 
Company, architects for the Public Health Building, to discuss 
their plans with the committee. 

The architects showed several new proposed elevations of 
the building - one with complete pitched roof, one with normal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



pitched roof in the center and shallow-pitched roofs on the wings, 
and one with normal pitched roof in the center and flat roofed 



wings . 



The committee felt that the design with pitched roof 



over the entire building was undesirable in that there was too 
much emphasis on roof. The committee rejected also the shallow- 
pitched wings on the grounds of poor appearance and unfeasible up- 
keep. The committee unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
design with normal pitched roof in the 
' center portion of the building and flat 
roofed wings. 

It was understood that the architects will prepare 

several variations of this plan for further consideration by the 



Trustees. 



The committee then inspected the Homestead. The building 



has been entirely renovated and proofed against termites by 

Aquadro and Cerruti of Northampton. After inspection, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees accept as 

complete the reconstruction of the Homestead 
by Aquadro and Cerruti in the amount of 
$24-j395»26 subject to completion of a few 
minor features. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 P.M. 



1659 






HOMESTEAD 




Secretary 



1660 



COMMITTEE 



r. 



Endowment 
Funds 



Ascension 
Farm School 



Sigma Aloha 
Epsilon 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



November 15, 1951 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated November 7, 1951 from 
Treasurer Hawley to the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts and the resultant mail ballot 
are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

November 7, 1951 

Trustee Finance Committee 
University of Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

Trustee Haigis, Chairman of the Finance Committee of the 
Board, has authorized me to solicit the Committee by mail for a 
vote concerning the investment of cash in our Endowment Principal 
Fund. 

There is available in the Principal Account the sum of 
$3,268.00 resulting from amortization payments on real estate 
mortgages. Mr. Moody of the First National Bank, of Amherst, 
which is Agent for our Endowment Funds, has recommended the pur- 
chase of $3,000 of Southern California Edison 3's of 1965 which 
are currently selling at about par and of which we already have 
investment in the amount of $2,000. 

Mr. Haigis approves of this recommendation and I enclose 
herewith a ballot form for your decision. 

You will be interested to know that we have completed 
the transactions, authorised by the Trustees, regarding the 
Ascension Farm Funds. All securities ordered sold have been sold 
except the British Securities on which the Bank is still working. 
Proceeds amounted to $1,822.01 more than the book value of the 
securities sold. $20,000 has been loaned to the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon Fraternity on the security of their note and a first 
mortgage on their real estate on Sunset Avenue. Ve have also 
purchased Treasury Notes, due April 1, 1952, at 1 7/S% in the 
amount of $22,000. Thus, we have invested the cash available 
in the Ascension Farm Fund. 

Very truly yours, 



/s/ R. D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



RDH:GHP 



16 j 



MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIL BALLOT 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



In accordance with the Treasurer's letter of November 7, 



1951 > I hereby vote X to approve, 



not to approve 



the purchase of $3,000 of Southern California Edison Corp. 3's 
of 1965 from uninvested Endowment Fund Principal. 



Signed: Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Ralph F. Taber 
John ¥. Haigis 
William M. Cashin 
R. A. Van Meter 




Secretary 



1662 



COMMITTEE 



Public 
Health 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

November 20, 1951, 1:00 P.M., Trustee Bartlett's 
Office, Boston, Massachusetts 



Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Whitmore, Bartlett, Brett, 
Deely, Taber, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Architects from the M. A. Dyer Company presented eleva- 
tion and floor plans for the proposed Public Health Building. 
These plans showed a pitched roof in the center of the building 
with the auditorium attached to the main building so as to form an 
L-shape. They recommended, however, that the auditorium be moved 
to the rear center of the building so that the whole would form a 
T-shape. This recommendation was made both for the improvement of 
the appearance of the building and as a more logical architectural 
development. They said that the auditorium in the rear of the 
center of the building would provide more reason for the important 
central section with pitched roof on the main building. After 
discussion and consideration of the plans, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
plan of the Public Health Building as pre- 
sented by the M. A. Dyer Company but with 
the auditorium moved to cent©r on the rear 
of the building to form a T-shape rather 
than an L-shape. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2 o'clock. 



-7 








--' -ff ecretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 20, 1951, 2:00 P.M., Trustee Bartlett 1 s Office, 

Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Deely, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the plan of the Public Health 
Building as presented by the M. A. Dyer 
Company but with the auditorium moved to 
center on the rear of the building to 
form a T-shape rather than an L- shape. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept as completed September H, 1951 
additions to the Electric Distribution 
System made by the Collins Electric Company 
in the amount of $24,932. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept as complete the reconstruction 

of the Homestead by Aquadro and Cerruti in 
the amount of f 24-, 895. 26. 

President Van Meter said that the University officers 

have been discussing housing for the next few years and have agreed 

that another dormitory for women is needed. After discussion, it 

was unanimously 

VOTED: To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to seek authorization 
for construction of an additional dormitory 
to house women students. 



53 



Public Health 
Building 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



Homestead 



University of 

Massachusetts 

Building 

Association 



Dormitory 



i664 



COMMITTEE 



Engineering 
Building 



Utility 
Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley informed the committee that the Public 

Building Commission is ready to provide funds for the preparation 

of plans for the completion of the Engineering Building. One-half 

of the building has been completed and is now in use. It was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the President and Treasurer 

to make formal request to the Public Build- 
ing Commission for funds to prepare plans 
for the completion of the Engineering 
Building. 

It was also unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Public Building 

Commission that the architectural firm 
of Appleton and Stearns be employed for 
the preparation of plans for the com- 
pletion of the Engineering Building. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the Legislature has appro- 
priated $113,000 for improving and extending steam, electric and 
sewer lines on the campus. This is a continuation of a program 
which has been carried on for several years, the plans for which 
have been prepared by the Office of Hollis French, Engineers of 
Boston. 

The Capital Outlay Appropriation also includes an addi- 
tion of |265,000 to the Dining Hall appropriation fund. Approxi- 
mately $65,000 of this appropriation is to cover the extension of 
utility service lines to the Dining Hall site and the plans for 
these also tie into plans for extensions under the other appropria- 
tion. After discussion, it was unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1665 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tracts with the Office of Hollis French of 
Boston for Engineering Services in the 
preparation of plans and specifications for 
Improvements and Extensions of Utility 
Service Lines as provided for by appropria- 
tions authorized by Chapter 756 of the Acts 
of 1951. 

Chairman Bartlett said that he and President Van Meter 

and Trustee Brett have interviewed a number of candidates for the 

position of Treasurer which will be vacated by the retirement of 

Robert D. Hawley effective December 31 > 1951. The vacancy was 

advertised in COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BUSINESS. Approximately 30 

written applications have been received. Mr. Bartlett said that 

some of the candidates withdrew upon learning the salary and some 

apparently were not qualified for the position. Mr. Brett said 

that he and Mr. Emery, Alumni Secretary, have canvassed possible 

candidates among the Alumni of the University. Mr. Bartlett said 

that four candidates have been Invited to be available at this 

meeting and the Trustees agreed to interview each of the four 

separately. The committee then met with the following candidates 

in the order named: L. 0. Adams, now at Northwestern University; 

Kenneth V. -Johnson, formerly at Champlain College, Piatt sburg, 

New York and now at Winchester, New Hampshire; Ernest J. Schmidt 

of the Western Electric Company of Haverhill, Massachusetts; and 

Donald P. Allen, now with the Extension Service at the University 

of Massachusetts. After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To appoint Kenneth W. Johnson as Treasurer, 
University of Massachusetts, effective 
December 1, 1951 at annual salary of $7320 
subject to final checking and approval by 
President Van Meter. 



Treasurer 






1666 



COMMITTEE 



Gririshaw, 
William M. 



Professor of 
Recreation 



R. D. Hawley 

Treasurer 

Emeritus 



B. B. Wood 

Librarian 

Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that the December 1 date was necessary so 
as to provide a month's training period under Mr. Hawley. 

President Van Meter said that with the retirement of 

William Vinal on November 30, 1951* he would like to replace him 

not with a specialist in Nature Education such as Dr. Vinal has 

been but with a man trained in the broad field of recreation. He 

said that Dr. Vinal has done an outstanding job in the training 

of leaders of Nature Education. However, many of his graduates 

have had to develop broad recreational programs for communities 

and experience has shown that they need more training in other 

aspects of recreation. He suggested that the new leader of 

Recreation should draw on the entire campus for offerings and that 

Nature Education should be considered as one of the components of 

a broad recreational program. After discussion and on the 

recommendation of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint William M. Grimshaw as Professor 
of Recreation effective December 1 or as 
soon thereafter as he can report for duty, 
at the minimum salary for the grade of 
Professor. 

In answer to question from Trustee Whitmore, President 
Van Meter said that the work in Nature Education would be con- 
tinued. For the time being Nature courses will be taught by 
William B. Nutting, Instructor in Zoology. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To name Robert D. Hawley, Treasurer Emeritus 
effective upon the date of his retirement - 
December 31? 1951. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To name Basil B. Wood, Librarian Emeritus 

effective upon the date of his retirement - 
December 31, 1951. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



1667 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To change the terms of sabbatical leave for 
Stanley N. Gaunt, Extension Professor, from 
one year at half pay beginning in September 
of 1951 to six months with full pay be- 
ginning October 20, 1951* 



Secretary Burke said that a committee of three faculty 

members and three students, appointed by President Van Meter, 

have been responsible for the operation of a campus broadcasting 

station. This serves as a laboratory for students in Engineering 

and students in Speech, Drama and other departments. The radio 

broadcasts are sent over the campus power line. The reception 

has not been satisfactory at all times and it has been difficult 

to confine the program to the campus as required under the terms 

of the broadcast license. This group would like to have the 

University apply to the Federal Communications Commission for 

authority to construct and operate a non-commercial frequency 

modulation broadcast station. This station would be licensed to 

broadcast over a wider area (approximately five miles from the 

campus) and static would be eliminated. After discussion, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the University to apply to 

the Federal Communications Commission for 
a non-commercial educational broadcast 
station construction permit and license. 

Trustee Whitmore announced that the Legislature has 

approved a salary of #15 , 000 for the President of the University. 

He believes that this will be effective July 1, 1951 hut must be 

approved first by the Governor and Council. It was unanimously 



Stanley N. 
Gaunt - 

sabbatical 
leave 



Broadcasting 
Station - 
license 



Radio - 
license 



President - 
salary of 



1668 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED; To authorize an annual salary of $15,000 
for the President of the University 
effective July 1, 1951 or as soon there- 
after as such salary may be legally pro- 
vided. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 P.M. 








y 



_Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 



December 4-, 1951 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated November 28, 1951 from Presi- 
dent Van Meter to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, 
University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot are 
hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

November 28, 1951 

To Members of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees 

We have just completed a careful analysis of the 
probable enrolment in the next three years. It points inescapably 
to the need for two more dormitories for women by the Fall of 1954- 

This is brought about by the steady increase in women 
students as the present freshman class of 4-00 women moves to the 
senior year followed by classes of 4-00. We assume that the number 
of men will not increase, although we did have a small increase thi 
year. 

We have this year turned one dormitory for men over to 
women students. Next Fall we can handle the situation by turning 
another men's dormitory (Mills) over to women for Baker will be 
ready for men. 

In the Fall of 1953 we shall be short on housing but we 
can get along by crowding and asking more students to commute. 
Any small excess we can handle for a time by putting three students 
in some double rooms. This is not good for the rooms are not large 
enough especially for three girls with all their clothes and other 
belongings, but it is defensible on an emergency basis. It is im- 
portant that self-liquidating dormitories be kept filled. To 
manage "this we have and expect to continue to have five or six 
hundred Graduate School students and Stockbridge School students 
for whom we have never provided housing and upon whom we can draw. 
Many commuters, too, wish to live on the campus. 

In the Fall of 1954 we shall need two new dormitories for 
women even if we continue to hold Butterfield for women students. 
We must begin to free the men's dormitories by that time. The 
attached estimates on enrolment will make the situation clear. 
The Legislature must grant, next spring, permission to build the 
dormitories if they are to be ready by September 1954.. 



669 



Women's 
dormitories 






1670 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

I am asking the Executive Committee to approve a request 
to the Alumni Building Corporation for the construction of two 
self-liquidating dormitories to be ready for use by September 

1954. 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ R. A. Van Meter 
President 
A 
Enc. 



MAIL BALLOT 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Executive Committee of Board of Trustees 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, I 
X_ 

rescind vote of the Executive Coramiteee of the Board 



vote to 
not to 

of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts of November 20, 
1951 "To request the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to seek authorization for construction of an addi- 
tional dormitory to house women students" and I vote to X 

not to _____ 
request the University of Massachusetts Building Association to 
seek authorization for construction of two additional dormitories 
to house women students. 



Signed: 



L. Carmichael 

Joseph V. Bar tie tt 
A. C. Brett 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Lottie A. Leach 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

February 7, 1952, 10:30 A.M., President's Office 

Chairman Deely presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Deely, Brown, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

The committee conferred first with the Academic Activi- 
ties Board of the University. Both student and faculty members of 
the Board were present. Student managers of the various academic 
activities described the work of the Collegian, Band, Chorus, 
Chorale, Operetta Guild, Index, Handbook, Quarterly and Roister 
Doisters. Throughout the discussion there arose repeatedly the 
need for a student union building where these activities could be 
centered and expanded. The Academic Activities Board expressed 
appreciation for the opportunity of meeting with the Trustee 
Committee. 

The committee met at 1:20 with the Athletic Board. 
Donald Allan, Chairman of the Board, described its organization 
and functions. There is pressing need, the Board said, for more 
facilities for outdoor sports and recreation, for a sectional 
tract in the Cage, and perhaps greatest of all for a Women's 
Physical Education Building. 

At 2:30 the committee met with the faculty and student 
members of the Student Life Committee of the University. This 
committee is charged with the responsibility of student social 
activities. This group also emphasized the need for a student union 
building to provide opportunity for a better social life for the 



1672 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



students. They requested that the University provide a social 
director and a director for academic activities. 
The meeting was adjourned at 4-: 15 P.M. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 13, 1952, 5:00 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass, 

Dr. Carmichael presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Carmichael, Bartlett, 
Mrs. McNamara, Desmond, Hubbard, 
Orton, Crowley, Whitmore, Deely, 
Brown, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call. 

It was 
VOTED; To approve the minutes of the last meeting. 

The committee discussed the report on hiring procedures, 
the recommendations as to procedures on promotion, and the report 
on tenure adopted by the Educational Policies Council of the Uni- 
versity under date of October 23, 1951 and approved by President 
Van Meter. It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the attached report on hiring 
procedure and recommendations as to pro- 
cedures on promotion. 

There was lengthy discussion of the report on tenure and 

numerous suggestions were offered for its modification. It was 

unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the following conditions for tenure 
of professional staff members of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. 

The following rules in relation to tenure as defined be- 
low will be in effect at such time as they are accepted by the Edu- 
cational Policies Council, and the Trustees and at all times subjec 
to laws of the State of Massachusetts in relation to appointments 



167. 



Report on 

Hiring 

Procedures 



Report on 
Tenure 



1674 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and service. These rules apply to professional staff members. 

For purposes of this report, the term tenure means 
appointment ■without specific limit of time, and such service 
should be terminated only for adequate cause, except in the case 
of retirement for age, and in the case of institutional financial 
exigencies. The committee recommends the following provisions: 

1. During the first three years a member of the pro- 
fessional staff shall be appointed for one year 
terms. 

2. During the third year a department head must 
either recommend him for no further appointment, 
for tenure, or file with the President a written 
statement of agreement between the department 
head and the faculty member concerning the terms 
of further employment, such agreement being sub- 
ject to the approval of the President. 

3. Any staff member whose appointment is not to be 
renewed shall be so notified in conference and 
subsequently in "writing by his department head 
at least six months prior to the expiration of 
his period of appointment. 

4.. Personnel hired under these conditions should 
be made acquainted with tenure regulations as 
described above. 

5. A staff member on tenure confronted by dismissal 
is entitled to a hearing before the Trustees. 

At the expiration of five years from the coming into 
effect of the above system, the appropriate committees of the 
faculty and of the Board of Trustees shall review its operation 
and make recommendations as to its continuance, with or without 
modification, in the light of experience and of conditions then 
prevailing. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, the members 
of the committee unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

following requests for sabbatical leave with 
the understanding that they would be granted 
if funds permit. If adequate funds are not 
available, selection shall be made by the 
President from the eight candidates listed. 

1. Leonard R. Wilson, Head of Department of 
Geology and Mineralogy, February 1 
through August 31> 1953 at full pay to 
complete the writing of a book on general 
micro-paleontology . 

2. William H. Ross * Associate Professor of 
Physics, September 1, 1952 through 
August 31 y 1953 at half pay for study in 
modern developments and methods in Physics 
at the University of California in 
Berkeley. 

3« Nathan S. Hale. Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry, September 1, 1952 
through August 31, 1953 at half pay to 
complete scheduled course work and 
residence requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree at the University of Minnesota. 

U- Robert P. Holdsworth , Head of Department 
of Forestry, February 1 through August 31* 
1953 at full pay to study forest industries 
of a sustained yield character and to make 
photographic slides to be used for in- 
structional purposes. 

5» Oliver C. Roberts , Associate Professor 
of Pomology, September 1, 1952 through 
January 31 j 1953 at full pay to visit the 
major fruit growing regions of the United 
States to study fruit growing and handling. 

6. Theodore C. Caldwell, Professor of History, 
February 1 through August 31, 1953 at full 
pay for study in England of source problems 
in English History, 

7. Jay R Traver T Assistant Professor of 
Zoology, February 1 through August 31* 1953 
at full pay to continue studies on may flies 
at Cornell University and Western Reserve 
University. 

8. Doric Alviani. Associate Professor of Music, 
for one semester of the year beginning 
September 1, 1952 at full pay to conclude 
work and study for the doctor's degree. 



A 



Sabbatical 
•Leaves 



Wilson, 
Leonard R. 



Ross, William 
H. 



Hale, Nathan S. 



Holdsworth, 
Robert P . 



Roberts, Oliver 
C. 



Caldwell, 
Theodore C. 



Traver, Jay R 



Alviani, Doric 



1676 



COMMITTEE 



Vinal, William G, 
Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Nature 
Education 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name 

William G. Vinal Emeritus Professor of 
Nature Education effective on the date 
of his retirement, November 30, 1951. 

President Van Meter said that the University Committee 
on Course of Study, which is made up of representatives of all the 
schools of the University, has recommended the adoption of nine 
new undergraduate courses of study. Four of these nine courses 
are in the Department of Education and represent the first step 
in the development of a program for the training of elementary 
school teachers. At least one new teacher and probably two will 
be needed for this new work in education and it is expected that 
the teachers will be provided in the budget now before the Legis- 
lature. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following new courses of 
study provided that staff and budget re- 
quirements can be met. 

Agricultural Engineering 82 - Refrigeration. Fundamentals in 
planning and operating a refrigerated storage with parti- 
cular reference to size, details of construction, cooling 
load, and refrigerating machinery and accessories. For 
non- engineering majors. 
1 class hour: 

1 3-hour laboratory period Credit, 2. 

Chemical Engineering 77 - Elements of Unit Operations. For 

other than chemical engineering majors. An introduction 
to some of the unit operations of chemical engineering, 
especially those which may be of use in other process 
industries. Includes: materials balance problems, 
movement of solids and fluids, filtration, centrifuga- 
tion, extraction, distillation, gas absorption, evapora- 
tion, and drying. The emphasis is on the principles of 
the unit operations and the types of equipment used, 
rather than the quantitative aspects and the design of 
equipment. 

2 class hours: 

1 2-hour computation or laboratory period Credit, 3» 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1677 



UITTEE 



Education 60 - Elementary School Curriculum. This course is de- 
signed to present a picture of the elementary school 
curriculum from the point of view of content and methodology. 
Emphasis will be placed on the unit method and the activity 
program. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3« 

Education 61 - Teaching of Elementary Reading and Language Arts. 
This course will discuss and demonstrate emerging methods 
of preventing and remedying reading difficulties. Attention 
will be given to the purposes, methods and materials of oral 
and written language and reading. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3« 

Education 62 - Teaching of Elementary Arithmetic and Science. 
This course will discuss and demonstrate accepted methods 
and materials in the teaching of these subjects in the 
intermediate grades. Attention will be given to methods 
of integrating these courses into the total program of 
the school. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Education 63 - Principles of Elementary Education. This course 
is designed to acquaint the student with the aims, 
organization, program, pupil population, etc. of the 
elementary school and the relationship between this level 
of education and the secondary school level which follows. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 



Music 6l - Teaching of Music in the Elementary Grades. The 
principles of musical development are studied with 
particular emphasis on presentation in the classroom 
situation. Although the course is designed primarily 
for those preparing to teach in the elementary grades, 
others may elect the course upon approval of the in- 
structor. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3« 

Philosophy 85 - Metaphysics. The field of metaphysics defined 
in distinction from the field of science; contrasting 
theories of reality offered by contemporary naturalism and 
idealism, especially in the light of recent developments 
in, biological and physical science; analysis of basic 
ideas which will enable the student to continue a fruitful 
development of his own philosophy. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3» 

Philosophy 86 - Theory of Knowledge. Types of knowledge and 
correlated methods of knowing; questions of certainty, 
probability, and limits of knowledge; ways of expression, 
such as mathematical formulae, language, and art, and 
their involvement in the knowing process; the nature of 
the relation between the knowing subject and the known 
object. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3- 



1678 



COMMITTEE 



Kimball, Milo - 
Dean of School 
of Business 
Administration 



Appointments and 
Promotions 



Retirements 
and 

Resignations 



Academic 

Activities 

Coaches 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Milo Kimball from Professor of Business 
Administration to Dean of the School of 
Business Administration at annual salary 
of $7030 effective February 1, 1952. 



The President presented a report on appointments, promo- 
tions, deaths, retirements, and resignations for the period 
January 1, 1951 through February 4-> 1952, and after discussion of 
the names and qualifications of those on the list, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
appointments and promotions as reported by 
the President, (See attached list) 

It was 

VOTED: To express the sorrow of the Trustees on the 
death of Charles N. DuBois, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, and Arthur N. Julian, Head 
of the Department of German. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
report on retirements and resignations as 
presented by the President. (See attached 
list) 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

payment from Student Trust Funds of annual 
extra compensation beginning July 1, 1951 
to the f ollowing coaches of academic acti- 
vities with the understanding that appoint- 
ments to these coaching positions will be 
made by the President. 



I 






M1TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. For general supervision of academic $300 

activities 

2. For coaching of Collegian 100 

3. For coaching of Quarterly 100 
4.. For coaching of Index 100 

5. For coaching of Handbook 100 

6. For coaching of Singing 100 

7. For instrumental coaching 100 

8. For coaching of Roister Doisters 150 

9. For coaching of Radio-debate 100 

The committee 

VOTED : To prepare two resolutions for presentation 

to the Board of Trustees on February 14. - one 
in appreciation of the services of Treasurer 
Hawley and one in appreciation of the services 
of Mrs. Lottie M. Leach. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:30 P.M. 




Secretary 



1680 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BE3PQET OK HIEING PHOCEDB'RI 
By Subcommittee of. 
EDUCATIONAL POLICIES COUNCIL 



The subcommittee was charged with presenting recommendation oa "' 
the following topic ss 

1* Procedure in hiring members of the teaching staff, 

2* Procedure in selection of department heads* 

3« Procedure in selection of deans* 

4. Procedure relating to tenure of staff members* 

The present report is concerned with the first three topics 
listed* In preparing the report , information was obtained about hiring 
procedure at other institutions, chiefly Harvard, Cornell , Tale, Michigan 
State* and Hhode Island State* A recent book by Lloyd S. Woodburae, 

lM^J m JMmmsLIP2^iMJ33^m^^^lm, (Harper, 1950) has been 
helpful* 

This report accepts the provisions of the Fair Htaployment 

Practices Law as passed by the Massachusetts Legislature* 



In recommending personnel the department head should seek the advice 
of other members of his .department* 

!• Positions Below the Rank of Aesi stanfc , Professor 

for all positions below that of assistant professor the 
responsibility for recommendation rests with the department head* 
Tills recommendation must go from the department head to the Dean of 
the School and through him to the Dean of the University and then 
> to the President for official appointment. 

XI. Selection of Pro fessors of all Ranks 

Appointments to the rank of assistant, associate and professor 
are of such importance to the institution that they merit a special 
procedure. This procedure should apply both to these appointed from 




dean of the school and the dean of the University shall rseommend* 



The department head will submit to the committee a statement of 
the requirements of the position, his procedure in making the search 
for candidates and data relative to at least one alternative applicant, 

Heads of departments and deans must make it clear to candidates 
that their recommendations are not an official commitment. 



Official appointment of instructors, assistant and associate 
professors is mad© by the President and confirmed by the Board, of 
Trustees. The appointment of professors s however $ is recommended 
by the President and the appointment is made by the Board of Trustees . 

HI* H eads of Departmen ts 

Heads of departments should be selected by a committee con- 
sisting of: 

X. Bean of the school concerned, (chairman) 

2. i Dean of the University 

3, President of the University 

Presentation of candidates to the committee will be the task 
of the dean of the school ♦ In doing this he should consult members of 
the department concerned and heads of allied departments. The appoint-* 
ment is made by the Board of Trustees. 

Jk. lean of Schools 



In the selection of deans of schools it is recommended 
that the President appoint an advisory group which might well include the 
following? 

1» Dean of the University. 

2. A representative or representatives from the 
school concerned. 

3. A representative or representatives from a 
related school or schools. 

B. Dean of the University. 

In the selection of a dean of the University it is 
recommended that the President appoint an advisory group th© size sffid 
membership of which would be at his discretion. A committee of five 
is suggested* 

C# Dean of the Graduate School. 

In th© selection of the dean of the graduate school 
it is recommended that the President appoint aa advisory group repre- 
senting the schools doing graduate work. 

All appointments are mad® by 
the Board of Trustees. 



I 



Approved October 23 ? 1951 



Gilbert ¥oodeide 

George Marston 

Philip Gamble 

Frank Rand 

H. E. Trippensee, Chairman 



BeocsamendatioQS on Promotions for Members of the 
Teaching Staff to the Educational Policies Council 

ly a subcommittee on Hiring Procedure Tenure. 
Pooling of Positions and Promotions 



Becommendation on Promotions 



The service which a university renders to a state depends to a 
large degree on the quality and morale of its staff* Morale is dependent 
on many conditions^ one of which is the hope of promotion 

Basis of Personnel Recomme ndations 



Because of the variety of conditions which make for good instruction 
it is thought no specific formula should be set up as a measure of satis* 
factory teaching service* Qualities to be kept in mind in making recommenda- 
tions are as follows* 

*'• Tsachin^, Ability s Doss this individual have a sincere 
interest in the welfare of the eiudent? Does his desire 
to be of genuine assistance to the student reach the 
point where extra time is given freely and personal in- 
terests set aside in order to help a student? Does he 
stimulate the student to seek knowledge and understanding? 
Does he use a variety of teaching methods, present well 
organized material and keep up-to-date on subject. matter? 

b* Professional Improvement : Is he interested in research or 
writing in his field and is h© constantly seeking to im- 
prove himself as a teacher and scholar? 

c » Inst^,^^ 3 - ^;, , lstfiS.aS.1it* A member of the teaching staff 

must have faith in the University, He must show this faith 
"brf his willingness to assume extra-curricular responsibilities 
and by his enthusiasm to cooperate with associates* He must 
be tolerant of but not satisfied with conditions less than 
perfect. 

In consideration of the above department heads should make 
or withhold recommendations, 

Gilbert Woodside 

George Marston 

Philip Gamble 

Frank Band 

R. E. Trippensee$ Chairman 

Approved October 23 , 1951 



COMMITTEE 



I 



| 
I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

March 8, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Wilder Hall, Amherst 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Taber, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer 
Johnson, Messrs. Brehm, Otto, 
Blundell, Secretary Burke 

The committee discussed several possible locations for 

the Durfee Plant House and locations for the two dormitories for 

women to be constructed by the Alumni Building Corporation. 

After preliminary discussions, the committee visited the women's 

dormitory area and visited each of the proposed sites for the new 

Durfee Plant House. The meeting was resumed at Wilder Hall and 

it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve con- 
struction of two new dormitories for women - 
one east of and approximately in line with 
Hamlin House and one east of and approximately 
in line with Knowlton House — each of the 
new buildings to be L-shaped or T-shaped and 
to be sufficiently removed from the neighboring 
dormitories so that a parking area may be pro- 
vided in the quadrangle embraced by the four 
buildings . 

It was recommended that the Superintendent of Buildings 
and the Campus Planning Council work with the architect as to the 
exact site, the level, grading, and the layout for parking. 

Professor Blundell said that the firm of Lord and Burn- 
ham had been consulted concerning the possibility of replacing 
the present Durfee Plant House with the $70,000 appropriated for 
that purpose by the Legislature. 



Ool 



Durfee Plant 
House 



Dormitories 
for Women 



1682 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At today's costs Lord and Burnham feel that it would be 
impossible to duplicate the Plant House as to architectural style 
but that approximately the same number of square feet might be en- 
closed with glass of standard commercial shapes. 

Professor Blundell showed several sketches of rectilinear 
buildings but the committee strongly objected to rebuilding the 
Durfee Plant House with a. structure of about the same general shape 
and dimensions of a "tobacco shed". They felt that such a strictly 
utilitarian structure could not be a campus feature and if it has 
to be erected because of lack of funds, it should be located in 
with the other greenhouses and not in a prominent position. 

The history of the original Durfee Plant House was re- 
called at the meeting and the committee felt that it would be de- 
sirable to approach the Durfee family to see if the family might 
like to contribute to the replacement of the Durfee Plant House. 
In this way the original buildings might be recreated and the pur- 
nose of the original Nathan Durfee continued as a tradition of the 



University. 

VOTED: 



After discussion, it was 

That if adequate funds can be obtained from 
private sources to supplement the state appro- 
priation of $70,000 and provide for the con- 
struction of a well proportioned attractive 
plant house, the committee recommends that the 
Board of Trustees approve the location of such 
plant house on the site of or as close as 
possible to the site of the original Durfee 
Plant House. 



If additional funds cannot be obtained, the committee 
VOTED: To examine possible sites at a later date. 



COMMITTEE 



mi 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the preceding discussion of the Durfee Plant House. 
Professor Kozlowski, Head of the Department of Botany, and Pro- 
fessor Thayer, Head of the Department of Floriculture, participated 
in the meeting at the request of the committee. Professor 
Kozlowski said that he would greatly prefer to have the Durfee 
Plant House adjoin Clark Hall so that it would be readily 
accessible for class use. However, in view of the fact that such 
a development might block a later building site south of Clark Hall 
and would change the historical site of the Durfee Plant House, 
he withdrew his request that the building adjoin Clark Hall. 

Professor Thayer also spoke of the desirability of the 
plant house being attached to a classroom building but agreed that 
reconstruction of the Durfee Plant House in or near its original 
location would be desirable. 

The committee suggested that Professor Kozlowski submit 
in his next budget a request for a small greenhouse or greenhouses 
to provide for instruction and research in plant species other 
than the tropical and semi-tropical plants for which Durfee has 
been famous. 



The committee requested Professors Blundell and Otto to 
explore further with Lord and Burnham the possibilities for con- 
struction of a better looking plant house than that currently pro- 
posed for $70,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4- : 30 P. • 




Secretary 



"»o 



COMMITTEE 



Securities 



endowment 
<unds 



tonds 



lortgage In- 
vestments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
April 23, 1952, 10:00 A.M., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman ^aigis presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, Cashin, 
Whitmore , President Van ^eter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The Trustees reviewed the list of securities in the en- 
dowment portfolio and discussed investment policies. It was 

VOTED : To approve the present holdings of stocks 
and to continue to hold these until the 
next meeting of the committee which is to 
be scheduled in conjunction with the 
May 14. meeting of the full Board. 

The committee requested Treasurer Johnson to prepare a 
report on income from securities, to be presented at the next meet- 
ing. It was 

VOTED : To make no change in the holdings of bonds 
at this time. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the present list of mortgage 
investments. 

There was some discussion of the British securities 
placed with the First National Bank of Amherst for collection. 
Treasurer Johnson said that negotiations are now in progress with 
the Bank of England but that he has no report as to the possible 
value of these securities. 

The committee then considered uninvested endowment funds, 
It was pointed out that the University holds many small endowment 



r 



COMMITTEE 



o 



I 



\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

funds and that if it were possible to mingle these funds, they 
might be invested in such manner as to return additional income. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University also holds a 
large number of small cash funds from student clubs, class funds, 
University Store funds, scholarship funds, industrial grants for 
research and others. As of March 31, 1952, the total of these 
funds amounted to $197,079.33. Over the past two years the lowest 
balance in these trust and agency funds was $116,919 »45» The 
Trustees considered whether it might be prudent and desirable to 
invest part of these funds in short-term securities so that earn- 
ings might be received to be added to the usable funds of the 
University. Decision on these matters was postponed until the May 
meeting. 

Mr. Johnson said that there is approximately $25,000 in 
endowment funds now ready for investment. Of this amount $22,000 
results from the sale of government bonds which fell due April 1, 
1952; $2,000 is from the Proctor Estate and $921.04- is from retire- 
ment of principle on mortgages. He read to the committee a list 
of purchase recommendations from E. M. Whitcomb of the First 
National Bank of Amherst. Mr. Whitcomb' s recommendations are as 
follows : 



1686 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Approximate 
Price 


Yield 


103 1/2 


3.13 


95 


3.02 


100 


3. 


99 3/4 


3. 


103 1/2 


3.05 


100 7/8 


3.08 



American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
3 3/8' s due 1973, call price 104.6 

Dominion of Canada 2 3/4' s due 1975 
payable in 0. S. funds 

Commonwealth Edison Co.. of Chicago 
1st 3's due 1977 

American Tobacco Co. deb. 3's due 
1969 

Continental Can Co. 3 1/4- f s due 1976 
call price 103 3/4 

Consumers Power Co. 3 3/8 f s due 1981 



All the above bonds are rated AA or AAA and 
most of them are legals. 

After consideration, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer upon consulta- 
tion with Mr. Haigis to invest approximately 
$25 9 000 in securities recommended on 
Mr. Whitcomb's list above or in other bonds 
which carry an AA or AAA rating. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University has re- 
ceived a 5% stock dividend from the Remington Rand Corporation of 
7 45/100 shares and after consideration, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to sell this 
Remington Rand script of 45/100 share 
and to retain the other seven shares. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the present cash investment of 
$42,115.14 in the Amherst Savings Bank at 
2^% interest. 

Mr. Johnson reported that the University balances its 
petty cash daily and that, as in other institutions handling petty 
cash, there are overages and shortages from time to time. 



I 



OMMITTEE 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Apparently the University has never adopted a policy for writing 
off overages and shortages and as a result these have accumulated 
over the past 10 to 20 years so that there is presently an accumu- 
lated shortage of approximately $195 • It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write off the 
accumulated petty cash shortage of $189»4-9 
as shown in the cash audit of the State Audi- 
tor of December 31> 1951 at the time that 
Treasurer Hawley retired. This write-off is 
to be accomplished by transfer to the petty 
cash fund of f 189. 49 from unearmarked trust 
fund balances. 

It was also 

VOTED : To request the Treasurer to report petty 

cash overages and shortages to the Trustees 
at the end of each fiscal year. 

The Trustees discussed the use of the income from the 

Ascension Farm School endowment and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make expendi- 
tures on proper voucher from this endowment 
in accordance with the terms as stated by the 
court in the transfer of this endowment fund 
to the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Treasurer to obtain recommenda- 
tions from the Dean of the University as to 
the use of interest on the Plumb fund and to 
bring such recommendation to the next meeting 
of the committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 P.M. 





^ .:".'■ »;. ■ ^Secretary 



687 



Charles F. 
Plumb Fund 



1688 



COMMITTEE 



Gilgut, 

Cons tan tine J. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



May 6, 1952 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated April 2U 9 1952 from. Secretary 
Burke to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot are 
hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 



April 2U, 1952 



Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 



Chairman Bartlett has authorized a mail ballot by the 
Executive Committee concerning the following recommendation of 
President Van Meter. 

President Van Meter recommends the appointment of 
Dr. Constantine J. Gilgut as Extension Plant Pathologist with the 
rank of Professor effective May 1, 1952 at annual salary of $6180. 
Professor Gilgut has been employed by the University since 
August 1, 1935 and is currently serving as Assistant Professor at 
the Valtham Field Station. He received his Bachelor of Science 
degree in 1931 and his Master of Science in 1934- from the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. He also holds the degree Master of 
Arts (1937) from Harvard University and the Ph.D. degree (194-2) 
also from Harvard. 

Dr. Theodore T. Kozlowski, Head of the Department of 
Botany, and Mr. H. Sidney Vaughan, State County Agent -Leader, 
have reviewed in detail the qualifications of a large number of 
candidates and recommend Dr. Gilgut 1 s appointment without reserva- 
tion as being the best qualified, both in experience and training. 
His knowledge of the State of Massachusetts and the support and 
confidence that growers have in him give added weight to this 
recommendation . 

The recommendation for this appointment also has the 
support of Dr. Ray M. Koon and key men of the Waltham Station 
staff, senior members of the Department of Botany and Heads of 
the Departments of Agronomy, Floriculture, Pomology and Olericul- 
ture. Directors Dayton and Sieling concur. 

He served as a substitute for Dr. Oran C. Boyd during 
the period May 15 to September 15, 1935 when Dr. Boyd was ill. 
While serving in this capacity, he rendered very satisfactory 
service and was popular among County Extension staffs and farmers 
throughout the state. 



Er 



I 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Since Dr. Gilgut has won this recommendation in 
competition with other candidates who would require an appointment 
as full Professor in order to be interested, we feel that he 
should be appointed as full Professor. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James W. Burke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



38' 



MAIL BALLOT 



I vote to 



approve the appointment 



not to 



of Dr. Cons tan tine J. Gilgut as Extension 
Plant Pathologist with the rank of Professor 
effective May 1, 1952 at annual salary of $6130, 



Signed: 



Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 
William Cashin 
Philip F. "Whitmore 




Secretary 



1690 



COMMITTEE 



Addition to 
Clark Hall 
Greenhouse 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Amherst, Mass. 



May 16, 1952 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated May 7, 1952 from Secretary 
Burke to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees, University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail 
ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board, 



May 7, 1952 



Committee on Buildings & Grounds 
University of Massachusetts 



You will recall that at the last meeting of the 
Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds, there was discussion 
of the need for a small greenhouse in connection with the Botany 
building. The committee invited Professor Kozlowski, Head of the 
Department of Botany, to submit an item for such greenhouse in 
his next budget. 

Meantime it has developed that a balance of $8,000 
from the present budget is available for this purpose. Chairman 
Whitmore has accordingly authorized me to solicit by mail ballot 
your approval of the proposed location of this small greenhouse 
in connection with Clark Hall. 

Professor Otto, Chairman of the Campus Planning 
Council, says that the greenhouse will be approximately 25 feet 
long and will extend in a westerly direction from the southwest 
corner of the present greenhouse attached to Clark Hall. This 
addition will not interfere with the parking lot nor will it 
call for any tree removal. 



Mail ballot is enclosed. 



Sincerely, 



/s/ James W. Burke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



I 



ONIMITTEE 



*3 



r\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I vote to 



MAIL BALLOT 



approve location of a proposed 



not to 



greenhouse addition to Clark Hall of approximately 
25 feet in length extending westerly from the south- 
vest corner of the present greenhouse attached to 



Clark Hall. 



Signed: John W. H a igis 

F. Roland McDermott 
A. C. Erett 
Philip F. "Whitnicre 




Secretary 



COMMITTEE 



Bonds, sale 
of 



Endowment 
Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May H, 1952, 10:00 A.M., Butterfield Dorraitoiy, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PPESENT: Trustees Haigis, Cashin, McDermott, 
Bartlett, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee and 
the Treasurer to sell 20 shares of Royal 
Typewriter Co. 7% Preferred and to invest 
the proceeds therefrom in common stock of 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees continue 
to hold all other stocks except the 
Royal Typewriter 7% Preferred. 

The committee discussed further the topic introduced at 
the April 23rd meeting in Boston; namely, the possibility of pool- 
ing investment of endowment funds so that small balances now idle 
could be invested and income received from them. After further 
discussion, it was 

VOTED: That, whereas it is the desire of the 

Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
to invest in the most prudent manner the 
Endowment Funds held by them, and that may 
from time to time be received and acquired 
and held by them, with due regard to the 
earnings and income therefrom, and whereas 
the segregation of funds for investment 
tends to make uneconomical use of small 
balances not large enough by themselves 
for investment, and whereas it is the in- 
tent and purpose of the Trustees of the 



OMMITTEE 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University of Massachusetts to adopt in- 
vestment policies that will safeguard the 
principal of its endowment funds and make 
the income therefrom available for the 
specific purpose or purposes for which 
each endowment was established, now there- 
fore it is recommended that the Trustees 
shall authorize that all endowment funds 
of thf University of Massachusetts, except 
wherein the terms of a particular endowment 
are otherwise restricted, shall be pooled 
for the purpose of investment; that income 
from pool investments shall be recorded in 
an account called "Undistributed Income on 
Pooled Investments" and that periodically 
the income recorded in this account shall be 
allocated among the participating funds on 
the basis of the relative contributions of 
each endowment fund to the total of the pool 
investments, said allocated income to be 
available for use in accordance with the 
terms of the original bequest. Profits on 
the sale of pool investments are to be re- 
corded in an account entitled "Reserve for 
Profits and Losses on Pool Investments" and 
such funds should be invested and maintained 
permanently as a safeguard against loss of 
principal on pool investments and the earn- 
ings should be added thereto. Losses on 
sale of pool investments are to be charged 
to this fund. The Chairman of the Finance 
Committee and the Treasurer are authorized 
to take the necessary action to effectuate 
this policy and make it operative. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that since the April 23 meet- 
ing of the Finance Committee, the Federal Government has brought 
out new bond issues that may affect current investment possibili- 
ties and current holdings of U. S. Savings Bonds Series G. He 
felt that the committee might wish to wait for further information 
concerning these new bonds and the possible income from them. 
After discussion, it was 



p> f\ 3 > 



Pooled 
Funds 



1694 



COMMITTEE 



Securities 



Charles S. 
Plumb Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee 
and the Treasurer to include Government 
Bonds of nearly equivalent yield in the 
list of securities approved for purchase 
at the April 23, 1952 Finance Committee 
meeting and to take such action as may be 
required to convert or exchange present 
holdings of Government Bonds into new 
offerings of the Federal Government. 

On the recommendation of the Dean of the University 

transmitted through the Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

an award of $150 from the Charles S. Plumb 
Fund to Theodore Covert to help in 
financing a trip to Holland for the pur- 
pose of visiting farms and dairies. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

annual awards of $125 from the Plumb Fund 
to students recommended by the School of 
Agriculture until the available balance 
is reduced to less than $125 and to make 
further awards thereafter whenever the 
income is equal to or exceeds $125. 

Treasurer Johnson recalled the discussion of the Finance 
Committee on April 23 concerning the possibility of investing in 
short-term securities a proportion of the trust and agency funds 
which the University now has on deposit many of them at no interest 
and some which, bear an interest rate of l/U of 1%. The committee 
felt that a portion of these funds could be safely invested in 
short-term securities to provide additional income for the Uni- 
versity and after discussion, it was 






I 
I 



OMM1TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



fOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer with the advice and consent 
of the Chairman of the Finance Committee 
to invest balances in the Trust and Agency- 
Funds of the University in short-term U. S. 
Treasury Notes and Certificates, Certificates 
of Deposit, or short term notes of the 
Commercial Credit Company when it appears 
that the total of all such Trust and Agency 
Funds exceed cur-rent demands on the funds. 
Any income derived from such investment 
shall be credited to the "Trust Fund In- 
terest" account and be available for use 
in accordance with the policy for using 
other unearmarked trust fund income. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 A.M. 



95 



Trust 
Funds 




Secretary 



1696 



COMMITTEE 



Agricultural 
Teachers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITT . 
ON AGEI CULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

June 7, 1952, 10:30 A.M., Valtham Field Station 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Broderick, Brown, 
Crowley, President Van Meter, 
Messrs. Roger Peck (Mass. Fruit 
Growers Assoc), Ralph Thacher 
(Cape Cod Cranberry Assoc), George 
Treadwell (Mass. Federation of 
Poultry Assoc), Fred Dole (Mass. 
State Grange), Sieling, Koon, Dayton, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

After a tour of the buildings and grounds, Dr. Sieling 
outlined agricultural accomplishments in 1951-52 under Instruction, 

jeriment Station, and Control Service. Mr. Dayton outlined 
accomplishments of the Extension Service. 

Dean Sieling then discussed plans for the future of the 
agricultural program.. He said that at present 60 members of the 
staff of I84. are employed as teachers and their service is 
rendered during the 32-week college year. All others are em- 
ployed at the same salary for similar grades but are employed for 
4-8 weeks per year. This makes an interchange of staff members 
from one phase of work to another; that is, Extension to teaching 
or teaching to research - impractical, even though such an inter- 
change might result in better work efficiency. 

He said that Massachusetts is the only state which does 
not recognize a differential in pay for those employed during the 
school year as against those employed for 4-8 weeks each year. He 
recommended that the University establish a pay differential of 

roximately 15% of the base pay of each grade for those persons 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

required to work 43 weeks as compared to those in similar grades 
who are required to work 32 weeks. 

Dean Sieling recommended also that all department heads 
in Agriculture be employed on a 4.3-week basis of service, that all 
new employees be employed on a 4-3-week basis, that all qualified 
present 32-week employees be shifted to a 48-week basis, and that 
all departments be required to adjust their total number of em- 
ployees to meet the program requirements of the department on the 
basis of increased personnel service resulting from this adjust- 
ment (for each two employees increased from 32 to 4-3 weeks, there 
should be a loss of one 32-^week employee or a definite increase in 
the total production of the department) . 

Dean Sieling further recommended that multiple duty 
assignments be required of each employee wherever practical. 

He presented a table indicating a cost of $141,820 for 
changing the 32-week employees to 48 weeks and increasing their 
salaries approximately 15$. 

If this program were adopted and the departments were 
aired to deci e their staffs on the basis of one 32-week em- 
ployee for each two employees increased from 32 to 48 weeks, there 
would'' be a long range savings of $68,760 which would be a de- 
duction against the $141,820 increase noted above. Dr. Sieling 

said that these savings would not be immediate but would be 
realized only gradually as positions became vacated. 

Dr. Sieling then outlined plans for e. \ sion of the 
agricultural staff and presented a brief statement of the building 



48-week 
service 



1698 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and land needs in Agriculture. An outline of Dr. Sieliug's full 

presentation it appended to these minutes. 

Mr. Dayton presented the attached report on The Effect 

of the Personnel Survey on the Extension Service. Ke said that 

the State Division of Personnel has recommended the lowering in 

grade from Professor to Associate Professor or from Professor to 

Assistant Professor of a considerable number of positions in the 

Extension Service, particularly those in the Home Economics and 

4--H Club programs. He felt that if this recommendation is carried 

out, the Extension Service will be greatly handicapped in trying 

to carry forward an effective teaching program. After discussion, 

the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees support the 
classification of Extension Service em- 
ployees in accordance with column 3 of the 
attached schedule. 

This represents a reduction in grade of certain of the Extension 

Service positions and in effect is a compromise between the 

present staff plan of the Extension Service and the staffing plan 

as recommended by the Division of Personnel. The committee 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees support 
Dr. Sieling*s proposal for 4.8 weeks of 
service for members of the professional 
staff in Agriculture and request the Ad- 
ministration to attempt to work out a 
solution with the proper authorities. 

There was discussion as to the possible effect of this 

change in agricultural service and pay on other members of the 

professional staff of the University who have similar salaries 

and ratings and whose services are also rendered on a 4-8-week 

basis. It was agreed that the attention of the Trustees should be 



I 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

directed to these employees also in considering a solution to the 
program for Agriculture. 

In connection with the discussion of the lowering of 
grade of certain Extension Service positions, Mr. Dayton pointed 
out that when the State Extension Service attempts to recruit 
workers from the County Extension Services, no financial recogni- 
tion can be given for service rendered in the counties. It was 

[OTEE: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 

Administration to seek a ruling or legislation 
which would make it possible for town, city, or 
county employees transferring to the University 
to have credit financially for previous service 
rendered in the political sub-divisions of 
Massachusetts on the same basis as if this pre- 
vious service were rendered in the employ of 
the Commonwealth. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3; 30 P.M. 




Secretary 



1699 



1700 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



JOINT MEETING' OF 

AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE, BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AND. 

AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Waltham Field Station, Waltham, Massachusetts 
Saturday, June 7, 1952 
10:30 A.M. 



10:30 Tour of Station 

11:00 "What Happened 1951-1952" 

11:30 Program for the Future 

12:30 Luncheon 

1:45 "Our Problems Are Your Problems" 

3:00 Adjourn 



I 



Agricultural Committee. Board of Trustees 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman Dennis M. Crowley 

Earry Dunlap Brown Ernest Eoftyzer 

Eenry T. Broderick 

Agricultur al Ad visory Council Representatives 

Clifford Belden, Connecticut & Massachusetts Tobacco Cooxaerative 

Harry Blackadar, Federated Dairy Assocs. of Massachusetts 

Charles E. Brown, Master, Massachusetts State Grange 

Lorenzo K. Lambson, Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation 

Roger Peck, Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Association 

Stephen W. Sabine, Massachusetts Forest & Park Association 

August Schumacher, Massachusetts Federation' of Vegetable Growers' Assoc, 

Ralph Thacher, Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association 

George Treadwell, Massachusetts Federation of Poultry Associations 

Karl Ullinan, Massachusetts Flower Growers' Association 

University , of Massachusetts Staff 

R. A. Van Meter, President of the University 

James W. Burke, Secretary of the University 

James W, Dayton, Associate Dean and Director of Extension Service 

ICenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the University 

Ray M. Koon, Head, Waltham Field Station 

Dale E. Sieling, Dean of the School of Agriculture and Horticulture 



" What Happened in Agriculture in 1951-1952 " 
University of Massachusetts 



I, INSTRUCTION 

During the fiscal year 1951-1952 there were 372 students enrolled in the 
four-year course, 308 in the two-year Stockbridge School of Agriculture, and 
about 75 in the Graduate School who were majoring in some branch of agriculture. 
At the recent graduation, 92 were graduated with Bachelor of Science degrees, 
125 received certificates from the Stockbridge School of Agriculture, *J received 
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degrees, 21 received Master of Science degrees, 
and 11 were awarded Doctor of Philosophy degrees in some branch of agriculture. 
Students in agriculture achieved many campus awards during the school year, and 
were recognized by the various honor societies in about the proportion in which 
they were represented in the total enrollment of the University. 

The annual Flower Show, sponsored by students in the Horticulture de- 
partments, attracted approximately 25,000 visitors. The Little International 
Show and the Dairy Classic Show, sponsored ~by students in Animal Husbandry and in 
Dairy Industry, also attracted large crowds. 

II. EXTENTS ION SERVICE 

A. Reiteration of the long-established policy that the Extension Service 
and the Land-Grant Colleges are the educational arm of the Department of Agri- 
culture in the national agricultural program. 

B. County Extension Service and the University — Rapid progress is being 
made toward unifying the administration of the county and state Extension Servicer, 
and establishing a solid liaison of the county Extension Service with all agri- 
cultural activities at the University. 

C. Progress in Marketing — During the past year much development has beer- 
achieved in marketing a ctivities, particularly in the fields of consumer infor- 
mation and retailer education. Through television and other mass media, larger 
segments of the total population are being reached by the Extension Service. 

D. 4-K Club Program — The entire Extension staff is concentrating on the 
problems of increasing membership and maintaining high standards in the k- H Club 
program. 

E. Older Youth Pilot Projects — A three-State cooperative program to study 
the methods of working successfully with the between-age groups has been es- 
tablished and is accumulating much information and experience in this area. 

P. Grassland Farming — This is a new nationwide program in which Massa- 
chusetts and Now England are already far ahead of the rest of the country. 

III. EXPERIMENT STATION 

Noteworthy among the accomplishments of the research program are those listed 
below! 

A. Chronic Respiratory Disease — This disease of poultry has 'been on the 
increase and causing significant losses to the poultry raisers and breeders in 
Massachusetts and has assumed catastrophic proportions in the Delaware-Maryland 
broiler area. Important progress has been made in identifying the causative 



agencies, the node of transmission, and some information on means of restricting 
and curing the disease. 

13. Cation Exchange Capacity of Plant Roots — It has been discovered by 
members of the Chemistry and Agronomy Departments that plant roots have cation 
exchange capacities just as soil colloids have cation exchange capacity. This 
information has led to significant findings concerning the reasons for com- 
patabilities of various grasses and legumes growing in association. It is thought 
that this information will be fundamental in determining which plants may be grown 
together economically and with some chance of success. 

C. Chemical Thinning of Apples — It has been discovered that the chemical 
thinning of apples leads to the annual bearing of strongly biennial varieties 
such as Baldwin and Early Mcintosh. 

D. It has been determined that the pruning of Dutch Elm Disease- infected 
trees early in the stages of infection may lead, to a cure of the disease as far 
as that particular tree is concerned. This is of significant importance in the 
saving of historically valuable trees and those ; which are vital to the maintenance 
of special pari: areas, and so forth. 

E. Mechanization of the Cranberry Industry — Two important contributions 
have been made to the;' mechanization of the cranberry industry: (l) a mechanical 
ditch cleaner which saves substantially in the cost of cleaning the floodirg and 
water-holding ditches; riix! (2) a mechanical hydraulic sanding device which moves 
the sand from the bank or appropriate trucking point to the bog by means of 
water. This eliminates the costly moving of the sand by wheelbarrow or other 

me chanic al devic e . 

F. Broodiness Eliminated Completely in Rhode Island Red Hens — The Poultry 
Department has made a substantial contribution to the efficiency of poultry 
production by the breeding program i/hich has led to the production of Rhode Island 
Red hens that were 100 per cent non-broody. 

G-. Hew Variety of Broccoli — The Waltham 29 variety' of broccoli which has 
ideal bud size, color, and uniformity has been developed and has been accepted 



commercially. 



IV. COiITROL SERVICE 



A. Tree Diseases — Dutch Elm Disease has been found in samples from 39 
additional towns, making a total of 249 towns now involved; 13,107 trees have been 
found to be affected. Oak wilt disease has not been found in Massachusetts. 
Forty-eight diseases from 31 species of woody plants were identified from 8,4l6 
specimens. 

'■ 3. Poultry Diseases — (l) Pullorum Disease - 1,3^4-3,955 chickens, and 
'35.642 other fowl were tested. Only 0.009 per cent of the chickens and no others 
were found to be reactors. This compares with 12-1/2 per cent reactors in 1920; 
(2) Infectious Bronchitis - 1,096 flocks enrolled in the immunization program, 
and of those 142 flocks were tested. Only 19 of the tested flocks were found to 
be nonimmune; (3) ITewcastle Disease - A new spray method of vaccination was 
introduced and found to be successful. 

C. Other Control Programs — The Feed, Fertilizer and Seed Control programs, 
the Dairy Cattle Certification program, and the Mastitis program continued to carry 
on the effective work' demanded by the farmers and required under State lav;. 

-2- 



PROGRAM FOR THE FUTURE 



A.,'- sound program has two important parts — the objective and the plan. Our 
objective is to have a well integrated, efficient, productive, and effective 
program of service to agriculture. To achieve this objective requires a long- 
range plan which maizes the best use of personnel and facilities in all phases 
of the agricultural program. 

A. Plans for effective use of staff : At present 60 members of the staff 
of 184 arc employed for a basic period of 32 weeks (while school is 
in session); all others are employed at the same salary per yoar 
at equal grades for a basic employment period of 4-8 weeks. This maims 
an interchange of staff members from one phase of work to another, 
i.e., extension to teaching, or teaching to research, impractical 
and theoretically illegal even though such an interchange is indicated 
to do a better job more efficiently. Furthermore, under the present 
system, the staff members who arc employed for the longer service 
period are not receiving comparable rates of pay for equal service 
even though comparable education and experience are required to render 
the service. Massachusetts is the only state which does not recognize 
a differential in pay under similar conditions. 

It is proposed that: 

1. A differential of approximately 15 per cent of the base 
pay of each grade be established for those persons 
reouired to work 43 weeks as compared to those of 
similar grade who are roqpiired to work 32 weeks. The 
following table shows comoarativc grades and salaries: 

Proposed Differential Salaries for 



i 



Position 

Title 
Instructor 

Asst. Professor 

Assoc. Professor 

Professor 

Department Head 

2. 





Personnel Employ 
for 
Different Periods cf 


ed 
Service 




Teachi: 
Grade 
30 


iff Year 48 Week 
Salary Grade 
$3720 39 


Year 
Salary 
$4260 


Differential 

$540 


44 


$4560 52 


$5220 


$660 


52 


$5220 59 


$6180 


$960 


59 


$6180 62 


$7080 


$900 


60 


$6430 65 


$7980 


$1500 



All department heads in Agriculture be employed on a 
43 week basic rjoriod of service; all new employees 
be employed on the 48 week basis; all qualified 
present 32 week employees be shifted to the 48 week 
basis; and all departments be required to adjust 
total number of employees to meet the program 
requirements of the department on the ba,sis of the 
increased personnel service resulting from this 



! 



1 



adjustment (for each two employees increased from 
32 to 48 weeks there should be a loss of one 32 
week employee or a definite increase in the total 
'production of the department). 

3. Multiple duty assignment be required of each employee 

wherever practicable; apprentice training of 
younger employees be encouraged without stifling 
initiative; each activity becomes a departmental 
project and not a service project; promotions 
become a school and department function rather than 
a service function; and .that all available positions 
within the school be available for expansion of the 
program wherever indicated rather than being re- 
stricted by service appropriation barriers. 

4. The positions indicated below.be reclassified according 

to the schedule in paragraph 1 : 



Position 
Title: 



From 
Grade No. 



12 Ins true tor (Res) 
5 " (Con) 
12 (I?)** (Inst) 



30 



20 Asst Prof 

3 

5 " 
13 (19)** 



6 Assoc 
18 " 
3 
3 (5)** 



Prof 



(Res) 
(Ext) 
(Con) 
(Inst) 

(Res) 
(Ext) 
(Con) 
(Inst) 



m 



52 



24 Professors (Res) 59 

22 » (Ext) 

5 » (Con) 

5 (7)** (Inst) 

14 Dopt Heads (lnst)60 



To 

Grade No. 
39 



52 



Cost per 

reclassification: 
$540 



$660 



59 



$960 



62 



$900 



65 



$1,500 



Total 

Co s-t : 

$6,480.00 
2,600.00 
6,480.00 

13,200.00 

■-1,980.00 

3^300.00 

7,580.00 

5,760.00 

17,280.00 

2,880.00 

2,880.00 

21,600.00 

19,800.00 

4^500.00 

4,500.00 

21,000.00 
141,820.00 



**Figures in parentheses represent the present number of positions but when 
each position is increased to 48 weeks a corresponding decrease in total 
positions is indicated; the savings from this staff decrease could be as 
follows: 



5 Instructors 

6 Asst Professors 
2 Assoc Professors 
2 Professors 



@ $3,720. 
@ 4^500. 
® 5',220. 
® 6,180. 



$18,600.00 
27,360.00 
10,440,00 
12,360.00 

$68,760.00 



Net' Cost $73,060.00 



-2- 



3. Plans for staff expansion : Ours is a growing program; therefore, it 
is necessary that wc continue to expand our staff in those areas 
where expansion will serve the public most effectively. The 
following positions are suggested in the various services and 
indicate the direction in which we arc going and where the 
greatest need exists: 

INSTRUCTION 
Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture, (specialist in site 

planning) 
Assistant Professor, Food Technology 
Instructor, Forestry and Wildlife Management, (specialist in 

wildlife and general conservation) 
Instructor, Landscape Architecture, (specialist in fine arts) 

EXTENSION SERVICE 
Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics, (marketing 

specialist in food handling) 
Assistant Professor, Horticulture, (specialist in general 

horticulture) 
Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering, (specialist 

in farm structures) 

EXPERIMENT STATION 
Professor, Animal Husbandry, (specialist in animal physiology) 
Associate Professor, Wildlife Management, (specialist in fish 



technology) 
Associate Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 



Pomology, (specialist in small fruits) 

Plant Pathology, (cranberries) 

Agricultural Engineering, (materials handling) 

Dairy Industry, (physical chemist) 

Olericulture, (plant physiologist) 

Shade Tree, (pathologist) 

Shade Tree, (pathologist) 

CONTROL SERVICE 



Professor, Veterinary Science, (general diagnostic service) 
Associate Professor, Veterinary Science, (poultry diseases) 
Associate Professor, Shade Tree Laboratories, (plant pathology) 

C. Physical plant expansion : Because of the growth of the University, we 
are constantly being crowded out of buildings and off land that 
formerly belonged to the agricultural program. Our plans for the 
future include the construction of buildings and the purchase of 
land necessary to carry out the program for the future. 

Under the building program there are several 
items that are considered as emergencies. They are: 

1. Building Needs ( Estimate ) 

a. Fire escape and elevator, Fisher Laboratory none 

b. Parking area, Waltham Field Station $10,000.00 

c. Air-conditioning, Hatch Laboratory 6,500.00 

d. Auxiliary Generator, Animal Disease Laboratory 3,000.00 

e. Incinerator: Moved from Paige to Animal Lab. 2,000.00 

f . Repair of Farm Plant and Station Service 

buildings 27.250.00 

total — $^8,750.00 

-3- 



The major building requirements that are planned for the future are 
as follows: 

( Estimate ) 

a. Flint Laboratory modernization (1953) $50,500.00 

b. Poultry Plant modernization and repair (1953) 62,500.00 

c. Forestry Service Building (1953) 50,000.00 

d. Farm modernization (195^) 110,000.00 

e. Food Technology addition (195^) 280,000.00 

f. Service Building, Olericulture (l95^) 95,000.00 

g. Animal Industry Building and Barn (1955) 1,100,000.00 
h. Plant Science Building and Greenhouses 

(195?) — including space for research, 

teaching, and extension in Agronomy, 

Forestry, Floriculture, Olericulture, 

Pomology, Soil Science 1,000,000.00 

i. Research and Demonstration - Agronomy ( 195^0 50,000.00 
j. French Hall Greenhouse additions (1955) 35,000.00 
k. Repair, painting, renewal, French Hall (195 5) 25,000.00 

total — $2,858,000.00 

Other repairs, alterations, and additions are indicated but are 
not included here. 

2. Land Needs 

Requirements for successful operation of the Experiment Station 
and college farm indicate a need for additional land. It is 
estimated that the needs can be met most adequately by the 
purchase of land in Hadley adjoining the college farm. There 
are several tracts of land there that might be obtained but 
it is believed that about 100 acres would be sufficient and 
adequate for our purposes. 

Approximate cost — $150,000.00 



6/5/52 



I 



REPORT ON EFFECT OF PERSONNEL SURVEY 
ON EXTENSION SERVICE 

The "flagging" of all positions in Extension Home Economics and 4-H Club 
program's by. the Personnel Office in Boston, following their survey of last fall, 
has created a difficult problem in providing for the future staffing of these 
departments. By "flagging" is meant that a position when it becomes vacant must 
be filled at a lower grade. The following table outlines the situations facing 
uc -r* 

Present Position Future Classification 

Extension Home Economics 

State Leader (Full Professor). Assistant Professor 

3 Home Economics Specialists (Full Professors) Assistant Professors 

3 Home Economics Specialists (Associate Professors) Assistant Professors 

1 Vacancy (Previously Full Professor) Assistant Professor 

Extension 4~H Club Work 

State ^*-H Club Leader (Full Professor) Associate Professor 

Assistant Club Leader (Full Professor) Assistant Professor 

3 Assistant Club Leaders (Associate Professors) Assistant Professors 

Other Extension Positions 

State Leader-Agri culture (Department Head) Professor 

1 Specialist (Full Professor) (Agricultural Engineering) Associate Professor 

2 Specialist (lull Professors) (Visual Education) Assistant Professors 

(Young People 1 s Programs) 

The situation in Extension Home Economics has become critical because of the 
resignation of the State Home Demonstration Leader and our failure to secure 
permission to fill the position at any grade other than Assistant Professor. 

The State Home Demonstration Leader is the leader of all Extension home 
economics work in Massachusetts, She has administrative and program responsi- 
bility for the work of the seven Extension Specialists in home economics and the 
twenty-six County Home Demonstration Agents in twelve counties. 

Her position is a' critical one, A high degree of administrative skill and 
leadership is required, especially in connection with County Extension staff 
members where a cooperative type of organization exists. 

Filling Specialist Positions in Home Economics 

The vacant position of Clothing Specialist is a case in point. It originally 
was a full professorship. Now it has been reduced to an assistant professorship. 
We have not been able to find a person with experience and ability willing to 
accept the position at the salary available. We are novr searching for some less- 
experienced person who may develop and later on give the women of the state the 
service they expect from us. As an assistant professor, the new Specialist will 
start with lower pay than seven of the Home Demonstration Agents whom she will be 
responsible for training. Thus, it is impossible for us to promote the better- 
qualified County Home Demonstration Agents, or to look to them as a source of 
candidates, 



-v>r» »— <-■ 



- 2 - 
^~H Club Staff 

The situation here is very similar to that outlined in home economics, It 
is not as critical at the moment because there have "been no recent resignations. 
However, virtually the same problems will develop when resignations, occur. The 
State 4~H Club Leader's responsibilities are very similar to those of the other 
State Leaders, The Assistant State Club Leaders serve as Specialists. They 
train and give leadership to the ^~H Club Agents in the carrying out of k~H Club 
programs and in organizational activities dealing with adult 4-H Club Leaders. 

County Agent Leader 

The flagging of the State County Agent Leader's position from Department 
Head to Professor would be serious if enforced. The State County Agent Leader 
is responsible for the programs and' activities of twenty-three Specialists, of 
\tfhom twenty-two are full. professors, and twenty-nine County Agricultural Agents 
and Associate and Assistant Agents. Agricultural Extension programs deal with 
farm business activities; mistakes would be costly and even disastrous. The State 
County Agent Leader surely has responsibilities fully equal to those of any 
Department Head. This and the other State Leaders 1 positions are the key positions 
upon which coordination betvreen State and County Extension organizations depend. 

While, in future years, promotions may be theoretically possible under the 
terms of the survey through transfers of positions in Extension agricultural 
programs to Home Economics and to 4-H Club Work, this opportunity would be very 
limited if seventeen associate-professorships and professorships in Extension 
were to be lost. Possible future promotions do not help us to fill currently 
vacant positions with adequate personnel. 

In most instances, it is more difficult to find capable candidates for 
Extension positions than for others which might be considered of comparable rank. 
Extension programs are oarried on with adults, dealing with them in the fields 
in which these adults have made their life work. Teaching methods, must be 
skillful, interesting and highly practical for attendance' is purely voluntary. 
An Extension worker must be highly skilled and a natural leader in whom people 
readily place confidence. He is traveling a large part of the time and his 
evenings and week-ends are frequently scheduled for meetings away from home. 

If one considers only the University group of Extension workers, the staff 
may appear top-heavy. But the true structure of the Extension organization 
includes eighty-two county workers. When these are considered, the organization 
assumes a normal pyramidal structure, Massachusetts is the dnly state in which 
county Extension workers are not definitely state employees. Here, they have 
cooperative appointments. The nature of Extension work demands that the service 
operate as a unit. University members of the Extension staff must be qualified 
to give training to county Extension workers and state-wide leadership to their 
programs. 

Make-up of Extension Staff 

The attached sheets indicate the composition of the Extension staff in three 
columns — 

1. As it existed before the survey by the Personnel Office. 

2. As it will exist if the results of the survey are applied. 

3. Our recommendations for adequate staffing in consideration of both 

survey results and the minimum needs of the service. 



I 



I 



EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 





Before Personnel 
Survey 


Applying Personnel 
Survey 


Recomm* 


1 
4 



jnded 


1 , 

4— H Department 

Department Head 
Professor 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 





2 

3 






»*^» -»• 




1 
4 




MMM 




*-Assistant Professors 
*~Instructors 

Totals 


8 
.12 


32 


^«wnn 


8 


32 




8 

.12 


32 


Home Economics 

Department Head 
♦♦-Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 






5 
3 






— 





8 




» u - — 



3 
5 





♦-Assistant Professors 
♦-Instructors 

Totals 


li 


34 


— 


11 


34 


1 ,B ■' ' 


11 
-15 


34 


Agriculture 

Department Head 
***-Professora 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professor 




i 

22 
1 





< »» «» « 




21 

2 

1 






1 

17 

6 






*-Professors 
*-Associate Professors 
*-Assistant Professors 
♦-Instructors 

Totals 


3 
14 

10 
2 


53 


1 M » — 


3 
14 
10 

2 


53 





3 
14 
10 

2 


53 


Office of Information 





















Department Head 
Professors 
Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 

Totals 

Administration 
Director 

Secretary (Associate 
Professor) 

Totals 




2 



_2 





1 

4 



5 



5 



l 
1 




1 
2 
2 



1 

1 



♦-County Workers. Classified "by salary in corresponding University grade. 
♦♦-One Professor (H.R.Mdntire) transferred from auxiliary services to home 

economics, 
♦♦♦-One temporary (F.E.Cole) included, also position of L.V.Loy transferred 

from auxiliary services to agriculture. 



2 - 



Totals 



Director 
Department Head 
Professors 
Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 
Total for State 

^-Professors 
*-Associate Professors 
*-Assistant Professors 
^-Instructors 

Total for County 

Total Extension Staff 



Before Personne 


il ' App' 


lying Personnel 




Survey 




Survey 




Recommended 


1 


• •. '■"'■'■:' ., 


1 






1 


1 


» twx 







, 


1 


31 
8 


, ,, ,, , 


22 
4 




>MM L , 


22 

18 


_2 

44 


!■■■»■ 


-1Z 


44 




2 

44 


3 

13 '" 
30 

82 





3 

13 
30 

J26 


82 


~ — 


3 

13 
30 

82 


aff 126 


• 




126 




126 



*-County Workers 



c~5/l2/52-4o 



oOo- 



I 



li 



3MMITTEE 



igma Phi Fraternity, was invited to join the meeting. There 



followed a discussion of the manner in which a piece of land 
offered for sale at $5,000 by Alpha Sigma Phi could best be ac- 
quired for the University. This tract of land of approximately 
37,B90 square feet is bordered on the north by Clark Hill Road and 
on the west by Stockbridge Road. Mr. Brett explained his 
correspondence with Dr. Goldthwait who was willing to have his 
$2,500 scholarship gift to the University of Massachusetts Founda- 
tion, Inc. used for the purchase of the land, or in any other 
manner that would accomplish the objectives. The offer from Alpha 
Sigma Phi provides for selling the land to the University for 

$5 > 000 to which they would add the balance in their treasury of 
approximately $3, 800 and then give the total to the University as 
a scholarship fund for needy students. After considerable 
discussion in which various ways of procuring the land, including 
appropriation by the Legislature, were discussed, Mr. Gaskill 
offered to explore further the possibility of other members of 
the fraternity contributing to a fund for the purchase of the 
land with the ultimate view of donating it to the University. 



17- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

July 15, 1952, 10:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman ¥hitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees wnitmore, Brett, Deely, 
McDermott, President Van Meter 
and Treasurer Johnson 

In the absence of the Secretary, Treasurer Johnson kept 

the minutes of the meeting. 

Mr. Edwin F. Gaskill, Treasurer of Gamma Chapter of Alpha Land Purchase 



Alpha Sigma Phi 



1702 



COMMITTEE 



Physical Educa- 
tion Improve- 
ments and Tennis 
Courts 



Capital 

Outlay 

Appropriations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To defer action until additional in- 
formation is available. 

Treasurer Johnson announced that a special appropriation 
of $75*000 was available for Physical Education Improvements in- 
cluding tennis courts, a sectional running track and an additional 
chain-link fence for the east side of the athletic field. Pro- 
fessor Otto, of the Campus Planning Council, and Mr. Brehm were 
invited to join the meeting to make recommendations for the loca- 
tion of the tennis courts. Two sites, for approximately 20 tennis 
courts, had been considered by the Campus Planning Council: The 
Federal Circle Area and the area west of Goodell Library and 
directly north of the present tennis courts. The second site was 
recommended by the Council. After inspection of the two sites, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
. the site west of Goodell Library and 
directly north of the present tennis 
courts for 20 additional tennis courts. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to sign a contract for con- 
struction of tennis courts and other 
physical education improvements within the 
special appropriation of $75 > 000. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that appropriations for the 
1953 Capital Outlay Program made by the 1952 session of the Legis- 
lature are as follows: It was emphasized that these figures are 
unofficial since to date no word has been received from the 
Comptroller's Bureau. The figures were acquired from the Deputy 
Budget Commissioner. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Improvements to Bowker Auditorium 
Additional Improvements to Paige 

Laboratory 
Improvements to Farm and. Daily Buildings 
Completion of the Engineering Building 
Construction of a Public Health Center 
Replacement and Extension of Utilities 



#236,000 
16,000 

75,000 

350,000 

1,031,000 

166,000 



Total Capital Outlay, 1953 $2,374,000 
In addition, special appropriations were made as follows: 



Improvements to Physical Education 

Facilities 
Improvements to Farm and Dairy Buildings 
Surfacing Clark Hm and Other Roads 



$75,000 

70,000 
90,000 



Total Specials, 1953 $235,000 

The Chairman announced that it would be necessary for 
the committee to recommend architects and engineers en each of the 
projects where they would be needed. The Trustees are required to 
submit the names of three architects to the Massachusetts Public 
Building Commission in order of priority of their choice. Mr. Brehm 
will continue to act as architect on the remodeling of Paige 
Laboratory. No architect or engineer will be required for the 
Physical Education Improvements as Mr. Brehm and Director McGuirk 
will prepare the plans and specifications. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that a preliminary study on 
Bowker Auditorium had been made by the Massachusetts Public Build- 
ing Commission at their own expense, employing Mr. Saul E. Moffie, 
Architect, 27 School Street of Boston. This study was to prepare 
sufficient preliminary plans to arrive at a cost estimate of the 
work involved. It was understood that the Board of Trustees was 
not obligated to employ Mr. Moffie to continue the work. Treasurer 
Johnson also reported that a campus committee appointed by 



a I/O 



Bowker 
Auditorium 



1704 



COMMITTEE 



Paige 

Laboratory- 
Cold) 



Dairy Plant 
Remodeling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Van Meter to coordinate the vork in the planning stage 
with the Architect, comprising of Treasurer Johnson, Chairman, 
Mr. Brehm, Professor Niedeck, Professor Alviani and Mr. McLindon, 
were not favorably impressed by the vork that Mr. Moffie prepared, 
It was suggested by the committee that another architect be en- 
gaged to prepare the plans and specifications for the remodeling 
of Bowker Auditorium. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To defer the action on the selection of 

an architect and to instruct the Treasurer 
to obtain more infomiation about Mr. Saul 
E. Moffie, Architect. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to sign contracts for the 
completion of the remodeling of the old 
Paige Laboratory and Annex. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Campus Committee, 
appointed by the President to study and develop plans for the re- 
modeling of the Dairy Processing Plant, comprising Treasurer 
Johnson, Chairman, Mr. Brehm, Dean Sieling and Professor 
Hankinson, have studied the work that needs to be done and 
recommends that an architect be selected to develop the plans and 
specifications. This work comprises the retiling of the floor 
and walls of the dairy processing areas, the rearrangement of 
processing equipment, expansion of the space available for 
processing within the confines of the present building and the 
renovating and equipping of the dairy processing laboratories. 
After discussion, it was 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To recommend that the Trustees name as 
architects for the remodeling of the 
Dairy Plant the following firms in 
priority order: 



1. 

2. 
3. 



James A. Brit ton, Greenfield 
Louis ¥. Boss, Boston 
Hampson & Fisher, Pittsfield 



The Electrical Engineering "Wing already constructed was 

designed by Appleton & Stearns, Architects of Boston. It was the 

consensus of opinion that the work of Mr. Appleton had been highly 

satisfactory and that he had been most cooperative in developing 

floor plans, elevations, and estimates of cost for the completion 

of the building. It was pointed out that it would be detrimental 

to the completion of the building and the best interest of the 

Board of Trustees if any other architect was selected to design the 

remainder of the building. It was 

VOTED : That inasmuch as the vote at the Semi- 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
on June 5> 194-8, was "If and when funds 
are appropriated for the construction of 
the Main Engineering Building to employ 
Appleton & Stearns, as Architect, and to 
authorize the Treasurer to execute contracts 
for architectural services and construction 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees," 
that it is recommended to the Board of 
Trustees that only the name of Appleton & 
Stearns be submitted to the Massachusetts 
Public Building Commission for the comple- 
tion of the design of the Engineering Build- 
ing. 

Mr. Brehm recommended that the Surfacing of F-oads on the 

Campus within the appropriation of $90,000 available might be most 

adequately and economically done by the Department of Public Works. 

It was 



Engineering 
Building - 
completion of 



Roads - 
Surfacing of 



1706 - 1707 



COMMITTEE 



Public Health 
Center 



Federal Funds 
for Public 
Health Center 



and 1703 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to contact 
the Department of Public Works to de- 
termine if they would undertake the 
road construction necessary and to re- 
port these findings to the meeting of 
the Executive Committee on July 21, 1952. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on the progress on the de- 
velopment of the plans and specifications for the Public Health 
Center Building by M. A. Dyer, Architects. It was pointed out that 
M. A. Dyer has a contract with the Trustees of the University re- 
quiring the submission of bid plans and specifications by 
November 15, 1951. To date, approval of preliminary plans and 
specifications by the Massachusetts Public Building Commission has 
not been obtained due primarily to the failure of M. A. Dyer to 
submit adequate information required by the Public Building 
Commission. The contract with M. A. Dyer calls for preparation of 
bid plans and specifications but does not involve supervision of 
the construction. Now that the appropriation is available, another 
contract for supervision will be required. After discussion of 
some of the obstacles that have been encountered on the develop- 
ment of the plans on this project, it was 

VOTED; To request M. A. Dyer, Architects, to 
be present at the Executive Committee 
Meeting on Monday, July 21, for the pre- 
sentation of a progress report on the 
Public Health Center. 

There is available a federal grant of $250,000 for the 

construction of the Public Health Center Building in addition to 

the $1,031,000 of State funds, making a total of $1,281,000 for 

the project. It was 



1 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to initiate an application 
on behalf of the Trustees for $250,000 
Federal Funds for the construction of the 
Public Health Center Building. 

It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to sign contracts for the 
extension of Steam and Electric Utilities 
within appropriations available. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to sign a contract with 
Merrill Associates for further development 
of plans and specifications for extension 
of Steam and Electric Utilities. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that a committee appointed by 
Prtsident Van Meter, to study improvements necessary to farm build- 
ings, comprising Treasurer Johnson, Chairman, Mr. Brehm, Dean 
Sieling and Mr. Blaisdell, recommends that the Agricultural Engi- 
neering staff of the University be authorized to develop plans and 
specifications for the Improvements to the Farm Buildings. It was 
suggested that a member 'of the staff might be placed on Summer 
School employment for the remainder of the current year and the 
next summer to develop these plans. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Trustees that members 
of the Agricultural Engineering staff of 
the University be employed to plan the Im- 
provements to the Farm Buildings. 

Since 1938, the University has been paying a flat rate 

of $1,000 per year for the use of the sewer of the Town of Amherst. 

The town has now requested that the University pay a larger share 

of the cost of operating and maintaining this sewer inasmuch as the 

University has increased substantially in size in the past twelve 



Steam and 
Electric 
Utility 
Contracts 



Farm Improve- 
ments 



Sewer Agree- 
ment - Town 
of Amherst 



1710 



COMMITTEE 



Electric 

Service 

Contract 



Name for New 
Dining Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

years. Treasurer Johnson has held preliminary meetings with the 

Selectmen and it was agreed that a rate of $3,000 per year would 

be agreeable to the town and reasonable for the University. This 

rate would remain in effect until such a time as the Town of 

Amherst made their proposed study of their sewer rate structure. 

It was 

JOYED: To recommend to the Trustees that the 
Treasurer be authorized to make annual 
payments to the Town of Amherst for sewer 
use in the amount of $3,000 per year. 

The Western Massachusetts Electric Company has notified 
the Trustees that their contract for electric service will be termi- 
nated on June 15, 1953, in accordance with their one-year can- 
cellation clause. It is understood that this cancellation is 
occasioned by the application of the company for a general rate in- 
crease. It was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
Treasurer on behalf of the University 
be authorized to negotiate in coopera- 
tion with State officials in arriving at 
a new contract for electric service and 
that the Treasurer be authorized to sign 
said contract. 

President Van Meter presented a report from the Campus 

Committee on Names for Buildings which recommended the name of 

"University Commons" for the New Dining Hall. It was the consensus 

of the committee that a more appropriate name might be selected 

and it was 

VOTED : To defer action on the naming of the 
Dining Hall. 

and it was further 



] 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTE D: To request the Campus Committee to ex- 
plore the history of naming buildings 
at the University with special reference 
being given to buildings named after the 
Original Trustees of the University and 
to submit a list of several suggested 
names for the New Dining Hall. 

Mr. Brett presented an offer from the Cape Cod Cranberry 

Growers Association whereby they wish to honor Dr. Henry J. 

Franklin on his retirement on August 19 f 1952 by presenting him 

with a place that he could use as his study and office as long as 

he lived or desired to use it. The proposal is in the nature of 

an addition to the present East Wareham Experiment Station Building 

The addition to the building would be constructed and furnished 

from private funds and title would be vested in the Commonwealth. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
gift of the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Association of an additional room and 
furnishings to the East Wareham Experi- 
ment Station Building honoring Dr. Henry 
J. Franklin be accepted with appreciation. 

The Treasurer read a letter from F. A. Merrill, Engineers 
on the Improvements to the Electric Generating Facilities, Turbine 
House, Contract No. U-201, in which it was recommended that the 
work of the contractor, Daniel O'Connell's Sons, Inc. be accepted 
as substantially completed on April 21, 1952, subject to the in- 
stallation of a switch gear and connecting wiring and facilities. 
After inspecting the Turbine House in company with Mr. Brehm, the 
committee 



10^4 



Dr. Henry J. 
Franklin Room 



Cranberry 
Station 



Electrical 
Generating 
Improvements 

Acceotance of 



1712 



COMMITTEE 



Baker 
Dormitory 

Acceotance of 



Elm Disease 
Laboratory 

Acceptance of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Trustees that the 

improvements to the Electric Generating 
Plant be accepted as completed on 
April 21, 1952, subject to and with the 
exception of the installation of a switch 
gear and connecting wiring and facilities. 

In company with Mr. Louis ¥. Ross, Architect, the 
Trustee Committee inspected Baker Dormitory i-nd received the re- 
port that it was substantially completed with the exception of 
some minor repair items and the installation of Snack-Bar Equip- 
ment and the alteration of the water-heating system. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that Baker 
Dormitory be accepted as substantially 
completed subject to conditions enumerated 
by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association, Inc. as of June 11, 1952, 
and that the dormitory be accepted for 
lease by the University. 

The Committee accompanied by Mr. Brehm inspected the new 

laboratory improvements in the basement of the Elm Disease 

Laboratory and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
Elm Disease Laboratory Improvements be 
accex3ted as completed with commendation 
to Mr. Brehm, who designed the labora- 
tories, as of May 15, 1952. 

The meeting was adjourned at A* 50 P.M. 




Acting Secretary 



1/ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 

July 24, 1952 

Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated July 13, 1952 from Treasurer 

Johnson to the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 

University of Massachusetts and the resultant mail ballot are 

hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

July 18, 1952 

Finance Committee 
Board of Trustees 

Gentlemen: 

The Trustees have received 4-5 American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company rights, three more than the number needed to 
subscribe for $600 of the new 2>\% issue of convertible debentures. 
These rights must be used before July 31, 1952. 

The "pooling" of the Endowment Funds for investment 
purposes has now been completed and as a result of the receipt 
from the First National Bank of Amherst of the statement of the 
agency account, there is an uninvested cash principal as of 
July 1, 1952, of $4,359.93. 

We have been approached by the officers of the Theta 
Corporation of Theta Chi Fraternity asking that consideration be 
given to a new mortgage proposal that they are preparing. With 
this in mind, it seems advisable to temporarily place the surplus 
uninvested cash in the Amherst Savings Bank at 2 3/U% until con- 
sideration can be given to this and other investments. 

I have discussed this with Mr. Haigis, Chairman of the 
Finance Committee, and he has suggested that the enclosed mail 
ballot be distributed for your consideration. A return stamped 
envelope is enclosed for your use. 

Very truly yours, 



17 



/s/ Kenneth V. Johnson 
Treasurer 



K¥J:GHP 
Enc. 



Investments 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



1714 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MAIL BALLOT 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
FINANCE COMMITTEE, BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

In accordance with the recommendations contained in the 
Treasurer 1 s letter of July 13, 1952, I hereby vote: 

To authorize the use of 4-2 American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company rights to purchase $ 600. 00 of 
convertible debentures 3 l/2's and to sell the re- 
maining 3 rights. 

Yes - Signed: W. M. Cashin 

A. C. Brett 
J. We Bartlett 
P. F. Whitmore 
J. V. Haigis 

To authorize the temporary investment of $4, 259. 93 

in the Amherst Savings Bank at 2 3/A%* 



Yes - Signed: 



¥. M. Cashin 

A. C. Brett 

J. W. Bartlett 

P. F. Whitmore 

J. W. Haigis 



i^dy^U4Ju 



_Secretary 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
July 21, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT; Trustees Bartlett, Chairman, Brett, 

Cashin, Whitmore, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Dayton and 
Mr. Brehm 



The Chairman appointed Treasurer Johnson to act as 

Secretary and record the minutes of the meeting. It was 

VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of the minutes of the last meet- 
ing. 

President Van Meter introduced a proposal that the 
Trustees intercede with the Division of Personnel and Standardiza- 
tion and, if necessary, the Governor to attempt to re-establish 
the salary grades and titles of certain so-called "flagged posi- 
tions" in the Extension Service that have been reduced from their 
present grades to lower grades when the positions become vacant. 
Three such positions are now vacant, one of them being the State 
Leader in Home Demonstration Work which has been reduced from a 
full professor to the grade of assistant professor. Mr. Dayton 
pointed out that it was not possible or desirable to fill the 
position as assistant professor since the incumbent would be 
supervising personnel of full professor and associate professor 
grades and heading up a program for the County Home Demonstration 
Workers who would be receiving higher salaries than their superior. 
Mr. Dayton was requested to make a study of the salary grades and 
titles for comparable positions in other land-grant colleges in 



171 



Temporary 

Secretary 



Flagged 
Positions 



■ f -• ■"»■ ■ .,.-..—- 



1716 



COMMITTEE 



Dr. Henry J, 
Franklin Roam 

Cranberry- 
Station 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the east. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To appoint a Trustee Committee, con- 
sisting of Trustees Brett, Whitmore 
and Cashin, to work with the administra- 
tion in seeking a solution with the 
Division of Personnel and Standardiza- 
tion and/or the Governor for the es- 
tablishment of satisfactory salary 
grades and titles for these positions. 

Mr. Brett presented an offer recommended by the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds from the Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association whereby they wish to honor Dr. Henry J. 
Franklin on his retirement by presenting him on August 19> 1952, 
with a room that he could use as his study and office as long as 
he lived or desired to use it. The proposal is in the nature of 
an addition to the present East Wareham Experiment Station Build- 
ing. This addition to the building would be constructed and fur- 
nished from private funds collected by a committee of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association and title would be vested in the 
Commonwealth. The addition would be architecturally in keeping 
and of the same type of construction as the present building. 
After giving careful consideration to this proposal and receiving 
assurances that the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association* 3 
Committee was financially reliable and could complete the con- 
struction undertaken, it was 

VOTED: That authorization is hereby given to 

the following persons: Gilbert T. Beaton, 
Chairman, Ferris Waite, Treasurer, Ruth 
Beaton, Secretary, Kenneth Garside, Robert 
Hammond, Edward Bartholomew, Ralph Thacher, 
Robert Handy, Russell Makepeace, Richard 
Beattie, Frederick Chandler and Chester 
E. Cross, acting as a committee of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to cons tract and equip an addition to 
the State property at East Wareham and 
to turn it over to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts fully completed on the con- 
dition, however, that the addition be 
used for the personal use of Dr. Henry 
J. Franklin as an office and/or library 
for the continuance of his research and 
study in connection with his long service 
to the University of Massachusetts and 
whenever he desires to release the condi- 
tion or upon his death, whichever shall 
occur sooner, the right of possession 
shall be in the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

In so voting, the Trustees expressed their appreciation 
to the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association for the honor they 
are extending to Dr. Henry J. Franklin. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds, Mr. M. A. Oyer and Mr. George Berlow, of the firm of 
M. A. Dyer Company, Architects, were invited to come before the 
committee to give a progress report on their preparation of bid 
plans and specifications for the building. It was pointed out 
that there had been considerable delays and seeming lack of 
cooperation and dealing through the proper channels in the de- 
signing of this building. "Whereas the contract for architectural 
services required the submission of bid plans and specifications 
by November 15, 1951 > sufficient information had not been sub- 
mitted by the Architects until July 15, 1952, for obtaining 
approval from the Massachusetts Public Building Commission of the 
preliminary plans and specifications. 

Mr. Dyer gave assurances that as soon as approval of pre- 
liminary plans and specifications is obtained from the Massachu- 
setts Public Building Commission, they would rush the plans to com- 



17 



1 



Public Health 

Center 

Building 



....... ..„. nr , — _- 



1718 



COMMITTEE 



Tennis 
Courts 



Dormitories 
10 and 11 



Garage 
Leases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pletion and could provide the completed bid plans and specifica- 
tions within eight weeks 1 time. He suggested that it would be 
possible to start construction this fall. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds, it was 



VOTED: 



To approve the site west of Goodell 
Library and directly north of the 
present tennis courts for the loca- 
tion of 20 additional tennis courts. 



and it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign 
a contract for construction of the 
tennis courts and other Physical Edu- 
cation improvements within the special 
appropriation of $75 > 000. 

Mr. Wilder Raines, as counsel for the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association, joined the meeting to present, 
on behalf of the University of Massachusetts Building Association, 
the leases between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, acting 
through the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
and the University of Massachusetts Building Association. Three 
leases are involved: an amendment to the 1943 Land Lease re- 
leasing enough land in the vicinity of the University Apartment 
Building for the construction of a garage at an estimated cost 
not to exceed $20,000 for the housing of 20 cars, a land lease 
covering the plots of land for the two dormitories and the garage 
building, and a building lease covering the two dormitories and 
the garage building. The two dormitories are to be located 
directly to the east and in the rear of Hamlin and Knowlton Houses. 
This site was previously approved by the Committee on Buildings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and Grounds. The buildings will be modified n L"-shaped structures. 
The Chairman raised several questions as to the procedure that had 
been followed in planning these buildings and obtaining authoriza- 
tion for them. Assurances were given that the same procedure had 
been followed and the same authorizations obtained as for all pre- 
vious construction of buildings by the Building Association. 
Mr. Haines stated that the bond issue would be for 25 years and con- 
sequently the rental payments to the Association would be either 
142,000 or $42,500 per year covering bond retirements, interest and 
insurance premiums. The exact amount of the rental could not be 
set until the Association acted. The garage building is to be com- 
pleted and ready for use November, 1952, and the two dormitories 
are to be completed in September, 1953 • The first rental payment 
will be due the Association in August, 1953 • There followed a 
discussion about the completion date of the buildings where it was 
pointed out that on most of the dormitories constructed to date, 
the buildings were not completed in accordance with the date speci- 
fied in the lease agreement. After further discussion, it was 

VOTED ; That the form of lease of two parcels of 

land for the erection of two student dormi- 
tories and of a garage building from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to University 
of Massachusetts Building Association, pur- 
suant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 338, as 
amended or supplemented, by Acts of 194-5, 
Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, 
by Acts of 1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 
1950, Chapter 414, and by Acts of 1952, 
Chapter 211, be and hereby is approved as 
presented to this meeting; and that the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
or a majority thereof, be and hereby are 
authorized, in the name and on behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to exe- 
cute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
stantially in the foim presented to this 



1720 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

meeting, said lease of land from the 
Commonwealth to the Association and to 
cause the common seal of the University 
of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

ED: That the form of lease of two student 
dormitories and a garage building by- 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts pursuant to Acts of 1939, 
Chapter 388, as amended or supplemented 
by Acts of 194-5, Chapter 390, by Acts of 
1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 19^3, 
Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter LXU 
and by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, said 
buildings to be erected by said Associa- 
tion on two parcels of land to be leased 
to it by the Commonwealth, be and hereby 
is approved as presented to this meeting; 
and that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, 
be and hereby are authorized, in the name 
and on behalf of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to execute, acknowledge 
and deliver, in or substantially in the 
form presented to this meeting, said lease 
of two dormitories and a garage building 
from said Association to the Commonwealth 
and to cause the common seal of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto . 

It was 

VOTED: That the form of agreement for amendment 

of the Land Lease dated as of July 1, 1948, 
and recorded with Hampshire Deeds, Book 
1038, ±*age 441, from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to University of Massachusetts 
Building Association, be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting, said 
amendment to be consented to by State Street 
Trust Company of Boston, Massachusetts, as 
Trustee under Trust Indenture dated as of 
August 15, 194-3; and that the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts, or a majority 
thereof, be and hereby are authorized, in the 
name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to execute, acknowledge and 
deliver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, said agreement and to 
cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 



X Q 



'}A 



Contracts and 
Reno deling Old 
Paige Laboratory 
ani Annex 



Lair;/ Plant 
Remodeling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign con- 
tracts for the completion of the remodel- 
ing of the Old Paige Laboratory and Annex. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds, the Trustees considered the names of architects for the 
remodeling of the dairy processing area and dairy laboratory in the 
Flint Laboratory Building. It was reported that architects had 
been selected who had knowledge of dairy processing plans or re- 
lated construction. Both James A. Britton, of Greenfield, and 
Louis V. Ross, of Boston, have designed dairy plants. It was 

VOTED : To name as architects for the remodeling 

of the Dairy Plant the following firms and 
to recommend their names to the Massachusetts 
Building Commission in the following order of 
priority: 

1. James A. Britton, Greenfield 

2. Louis W. Ross, Boston 

3. Hampson & Fisher, Pittsfield 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Bui] dings and Engineering 

Building - 
Grounds that reported that Appleton and Stearns, who were the archi- completion of 



tects for the construction of the Gunness Laboratory and the Elec- 
trical Engineering Wing, did a very satisfactory job and that it 

t 

was desirable to continue their services to complete the Main En- 
gineering Building, it was 

VOTED : That inasmuch as the vote of the Semi- 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Trastees 
on June 5, 194-3, was, H If and when funds 
are appropriated for the construction of 
the Main Engineering Building, to employ 
Appleton & Stearns, as Architects, and 
to authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tracts for architectural services and con- 
struction in the name of and for the Board 



Architect for 



1722 



COMMITTEE 



Roads - 
Construction of 



Public Health 
Center 



application 
for Federal 
Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of Trustees", to name Appleton & Stearns 
as the Architect for the completion of 
the Engineering Building and to recommend 
only the name of Appleton & Stearns to the 
Massachusetts Public Building Commission 
for the design of this project. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that, as requested by the 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds, President Van ^eter, Treasurer 

Johnson and Mr. Brehm had had a conference with Mr. Callahan, 

Commissioner of Public Works, who advised that the Department of 

Public Works would be willing to undertake the engineering and 

supervision of the construction of Clark Hill and other roads on 

the Campus and that they would prepare plans and specifications for 

contracts to be let. An appropriation of $90,000 is available for 

this construction* It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Department of Public 
Works to make the engineering surveys 
and to prepare plans and specifications 
and to supervise the construction of 
Clark Hill and other roads on the 
campus and to authorize the Treasurer to 
sign contracts for the construction of 
such roads. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there is available on 

application $250,000 Federal Funds for the construction of the 

Public Health Center Building. On recommendation of the Committee 

on Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to initiate 

an application on behalf of the Trustees 
for $250,000 Federal Funds for the con- 
struction of the Public Health Center 
Building. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign con- 
tracts for the Extension of Steam and 
Electric Utilities within appropriations 
available* 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there was an unexpended 
appropriation of $113,000 for 1952 and that the appropriation for 
utilities for 1953 is $166,000. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to sign a con- 
tract with Merrill Associates of Boston 
for further development of plans and 
specifications for extension of steam and 
electric utilities. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there will be available 

$100,000 for improvements and additions to the Farm buildings. On 

the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, it 

was 

VOTED: To employ during their vacation periods, 
members of the Agricultural Engineering 
Staff of the University to plan the im- 
provements to the Farm buildings. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that since 1933 the University 

has been paying the Town of Amherst an annual service charge of 



1723 



,000 for the use of the sewer. The selectmen of the Town of 
Amherst have now requested a larger payment because of the in- 
creased size of the University. On recommendation of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make annual 
payments to the Town of Amherst for sewer 
use in the amount of $3,000 per year until 
further vote of the Trustees. 



Steam and 
Electric Utility 
Contracts 



Merrill 
Associates 

Contract with 



FARM Improve- 
ments - 
Engineering 
Staff 



Sewer 
Agreement 



1724 



COMMITTEE 



Electric 

Service 

Contract 



Naming of 
New Buildings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Western Massachusetts Electric Company has notified 
the Trustees that their contract for electric service will termi- 
nate on June 15, 1953 • It is understood that this contract is to 
be cancelled because of a pending application for a rate increase 
on the part of the Electric Company. Treasurer Johnson stated that 
he had conferred with Mr. William Donovan, State Engineer, who has 
advised that he will represent the Commission on Administration and 
Finance in negotiating a new contract in cooperation with the Uni- 
versity for electric service. It was 

VOTED; To authorize the Treasurer to negotiate, 
in cooperation with State officials, 
with the Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company and to report the results of 
such negotiations to the Board of Trustees. 

The name of University Commons had been presented to the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds for their consideration as a 
name for the new dining hall. The committee recommended that the 
Campus committee, responsible for selecting names to be recommended 
to the Trustees, make a study of the history of the naming of 
buildings at the University with special reference being given to 
buildings named after the original Trustees of the University. It 
also requested that several names be submitted for the new dining 
hall for Trustee consideration. However, it was not their inten- 
tion in requesting this study that the dining hall necessarily be 
named after a Trustee. It was 

VOTED: That the Campus Committee be requested 
to explore the history of the naming of 
buildings at the University and to sub- 
mit a list of several suggested names 
for the new dining hall. 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds reported that 
they had inspected the Electric Generating Plant and found it to 
be completed as of April 21, 1952, with the exception of the in- 
stallation of a switch gear and connecting wiring facilities. On 
the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To accept the Electric Generating Plant 
as completed as of April 21, 1952 with 
the exception of the installation of a 
switch gear and connecting wiring and 
facilities. 

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds reported that they 
had inspected the new Baker Dormitory (Dormitory No, 9) and found 
it to be substantially completed as of June 11, 1952. Items to be 
completed consist of the modification and expansion of the capacity 
of the hot water heating system, the installation of snack-bar 
equipment, and the making of a few minor corrections and repairs. 
On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, it 
was 



VOTED : To accept Baker Dormitory (Dormitory 

No. 9) for lease as completed on June 11, 
1952, by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association with the exception 
of the modification and expansion of the 
capacity of the hot water system and the 
installation of snack-bar equipment, and 
the correction and repair of minor items. 

On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds that had inspected the Elm Disease Laboratory, it was 

VOTED ; To accept as completed as of May 15, 
1952, the improvements to the Elm 
Disease Laboratory. 

The Department of Public Health has requested the es- 
tablishment of an eight-week course for public health nurses to be 



Electrical 
Generating 
Plant 

Acceptance of 



Baker 
Dormitory 

Acceptance of 



Elm Disease 
Laboratory 

Acceptance of 



Public Health 
Nurses - 
8-week course 



offered at the University with instruction, except for two ten-hour 



1726 



COMMITTEE 



Petty Cash 
Variances 



Investments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

courses in Psychology and Sociology, to be furnished by personnel 

from the Department of Public Health. It was 

VOTED ; That in accordance with the request of 
the Department of Public Health an 
eight-week course for Public Health 
Nurses is established within the Short 
Course Division and that a tuition fee 
of $20.00 is established for this 
course. 

In accordance with a previous vote of the Trustees, 

Treasurer Johnson reported that as of June 30, 1952, there was a 

petty cash surplus of $4-3.35. This is a result of cash variances 

on the part of the tellers in the Finance Office for the period 

January 1, 1952 to June 30, 1952. In order that this variance does 

not show on the financial records of the University, it is 

necessary to clear this account in some manner. In the past, it 

has been written off from unrestricted Trust Fund Income. 

Objection was raised to continuing this as a permanent procedure. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to write off 
the petty cash surplus of $4-3.85 by 
crediting it to the unrestricted Trust 
Fund Income Account. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mr. Haigis, Chairman of 

the Finance Committee, had authorized a mail ballot to the Finance 



Committee requesting approval to purchase $600 of American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company debentures, 3 l/2's, using 42 
rights received from American Telephone and Telegraph Company and 
sale of the remaining 3 rights. The Finance Committee also voted 
on the temporary investment of $4->259«93 in the Amherst Savings 
Bank at 2 3/4-% pending a mortgage proposal from Theta Corporation 
of Theta Chi Fraternity. It was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



)MMITTEE 



VOTED : To approve the action of the Finance 

Committee in using 42 American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company rights to purchase 
|600 of convertible debentures 3 l/2's 
and to sell the remaining 3 rights and 
the temporary investment of $4->259 «9S in 
the Amherst Savints Bank at 2 3/I&* 

The meeting was adjourned at 1*50 P.^« 




-Secretary 



1 79' 



1728 



COMMITTEE 



Flagged 
Positions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE SUB-COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER 
"FLAGGED" POSITIONS IN THE EXTENSION SERVICE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

August U, 1952, 10:30 A.&., Mr. Brett's Office, Hood Rubber 

Company, Vatertown, Massachusetts 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Cashin, Vhitmore, 
Dean Sieling, Secretary Burke 



At the request of the Chairman, Dean Sieling restated 
the problem concerning the so-called "flagged" positions in the 
Extension Service. He said that soon after he became Dean of 
Agriculture in 1950, the Personnel Office in Boston sent four men 
to the campus to make a survey of all positions at the University. 
As a result of their study, these men prepared a report in which 
recommendations were made for changes in various positions. Some 
jobs were "upgraded". Some were scheduled to be "downgraded" 
when vacated. In the School of Agriculture, the report recommended 
the lowering in rank and pay of twenty-two positions of Associate 
Professor or Professor. When vacated, these positions were to be 
reduced to Assistant Professor. Most of the twenty-two are in the 
Extension Service, particularly in Extension Home Economics. 

It may be years before some of these positions are va- 
cated, but the first vacancy occurred about 18 months ago in the 
position of Extension Specialist (Grade of full Professor). Until 
this week, the Extension Service was unable to find a qualified 
successor at the rank of Assistant Professor. Meantime, the Home 
Demonstration Agent Leader who was in charge of all women's pro- 
grams in the Extension Service, also resigned. Her position was 
that of full Professor. 



^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Sieling pointed out that if the survey report is ad- 
hered to, he will be allowed to fill this position only at the 
grade of Assistant Professor. This leader would be in charge of 
two full Professors and five Associate Professors on the State 
Extension staff. She would also head the County extension programs 
in Home Economics, which are staffed with Assistant Professors and 
Instructors, in so far as pay is concerned. 

In answer to question from the committee, Dr. Sieling 
said that in all other states except Massachusetts, the extension 
workers located in the counties are employed by the State Univer- 
sity and are a part of the state-wide organization. In Massachu- 
setts the laws were so written that the county staffs are employed 
by the counties and work cooperatively with the specialists from 
the University. Nonetheless, in so far as the total extension 
program is concerned, these county workers should be considered 
as part of the state organization. He said he believed that this 
factor was not taken into account in the survey. Perhaps the 
recommended reductions in rank resulted from a feeling on the part 
of the Personnel Office that the Extension Service was over- 
staffed with high ranking positions. Dr. Sieling distributed 
copies of the enclosed outline showing the workers at the state 
and county levels in the various ranks. When the county positions 
are taken into account, he said, there appears a normal pyramidal 
structure of employment. If only the State workers are con- 
sidered, the picture is incomplete. 



1730 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Sieling also distributed charts prepared at the re- 
quest of Chairman Brett and showing the prevailing rate of pay for 
Extension Specialists in various states and the prevailing rate 
of pay for Home Demonstration Agent Leaders in various states. He 
said that if all positions of the grade of Professor are to be 
abolished for Home Demonstration work in the Extension Service, 
Massachusetts will be advertising the fact that its work is in- 
ferior to that of other states, which maintain professorships. 

After thorough discussion, the committee agreed to en- 
dorse the recommendations of Dr. Sieling as to classification and 
pay of Extension Service workers, in accordance with column 3 of 
the attached table. Column 1 of this table shows the original 
organization of the Extension Service. Column 2 shows the 
recommendations made by the Personnel Office and column 3 contains 
Dr. Sieling' s recommendations. 

The committee then adjourned to the Personnel Division 
in the State House and met with Mr. Burns, Director of Personnel, 
and Mr. Walsh, Deputy Director of Personnel. Mr. Burns and 
Mr. Walsh agreed to reconsider their recommendations and to take 
into account the Extension workers located in the counties as well 
as those at the state level. The pay and rank of the county 
workers are not within the control of the Division of Personnel 
but it was agreed that these positions must be considered de- 
termining the pattern of the Extension positions at the state 
level. They also agreed to study the tables showing salaries paid 
women Extension workers in other states. Mr. Burns and Mr, Walsh 



I 



3MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



were called into conference with the Governor and were unable to 
spend much time with the committee but agreed to report back 



later. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2*45 P.M. 




Secretary 



a f*i (T£ 



I o 



1732 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



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64 
ft 



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nrnrn — i — m — i — i — n — I — i — i i I 



X1U D*8800 



COMPARISON BT STATUS 07 SALARIES PAID TO 
SXM8IQB SERVICE STATB LEADERS Of 
HOME ECONOMICS 



H*L*Q $8200 

CalifOWOO 
H.^0W2O 

CfW75Q 



wM ia 0^7500 

<feia.J3>7350 

Ore. jy$7200 




Eaa.£J $6240 



Conn* 



R.I. $5725 



K.E.Q $5200 



Massachusetts 
(after survey) 



8/1^/52 



EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 



Before Personnel 
Survey 


Applying Personnel 
Survey 


Recomme 


1 
4 



jnded 


4-H Department 

Department Head 
Professor 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 



2 

3 





, — 




1 




— 




■"-Assistant Professors 
•"-Instructors 

Totals 


8 


32 


— 


8 


32 


— 


8 

.12 


32 


Home Economics 

Department Head 
**-Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 




5 
3 






— 





8 




— 




3 
5 






♦-Assistant Professors 
♦-Instructors 

Totals 


li 


34 


~— 


11 
OS 


34 


— — — 


li 
.15 


34 


Agriculture 

Department Head 
♦♦♦-Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professor 


i 

22 
1 





— 



21 

2 
'l 




— 


l 

17 





♦-Professors 
♦-Associate Professors 
♦-Assistant Professors 
♦-Instructors 

Totals 


3 
14 

10 
2 


53 


— 


3 

14 

10 
2 


53 


— 


3 

14 

10 
2 


53 


Office of Information 
Department Head 
Professors 
Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 




2 



— 1 




— 



1 

4 




— 



1 
2 
2 





Totals 



Administration 
Director 

Secretary (Associate 
Professor) 

Totals 



1 
1 



1 
1 



♦-County Workers. . Classified "by salary in corresponding University grade, 
♦♦-One Professor (H.R.Mdntire) transferred from auxiliary services to home 

economics. 
♦♦♦-One temporary (F.E.Cole) included, also position of L.V.Loy transferred 

from auxiliary services to agriculture. 



- 2 - 



Before Personnel 
Survey 



Totals 

Director 
Department Head 
Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 
Total for State 

^-Professors 
♦-Associate Professors 
♦-Assistant Professors 
♦-Instructors 

Total for County 

Total Extension Staff 



1 
1 

31 
8 

_1 



3 
13 
30 

-2fi 



m 



Applying Personnel 
Survey 



1 



22 

k 



82 
126 



Wt 



3 

13 
30 



82 



Recommended 



1 

1 

22 

18 

2 



3 

13 

30 

-26 



44 



126 



82 



126 



I 



^*m 



County Workers 



c-5/12/52-40 



— oOo— 



I 



IOMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 



October I, 1952 

Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated September 24, 1952 from 

Secretary Burke to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 

of the University of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot 

are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

September 24, 1952 

Executive Committee 
Board of Trustees 

Chairman Bartlett has authorized me to submit the en- 
closed mail ballot to members of the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees. 

The purpose of this ballot is to enable the University 
to renew its contract with the Veterans Administration for the 
training of veteran students under Public Law 34.6 and Public Law 
16. 

The contracts are in exactly the same form and specify 
the same rates as the ones approved by the Trustees under date of 
June 19, 1951 and covering the last college year. The advanced 
payment contract provides that the University may collect up to 
75^ of the amount of the total contractural sum due for the year 
1952-53 before the completion of the final billing under the train- 
ing contract. 

The training contract for 1952-53 provides for payment 
of veteran' s tuition at the regular out-of-state rate of $4-00 for 
students taking a full-time program. It provides a per semester 
credit hour rate of $13-33 for those taking less than a full-time 
program in both the undergraduate college and the Stockbridge 
School. The rates for the Graduate School are $220 per year for 
students taking a full course and |10 per semester credit hour for 
those taking less than a full program. Other student fees and 
charges are identical with those charged to all students at the 
University. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James V. Burke 

Secretary, Board of Trustees 



1733 



Veterans 

Administration 

Contract 



1734 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 






MAIL BALLOT 


~ 


COMMITTEE 


I vote to X authorize the Treasurer of 
not to 






the University to sign the following contract with the 






Veterans Administration in the name of and for the Board 






of Trustees. 






1. Advance payment contract for 1952-53 • 






2. Veterans training contract for 1952-53. 






Signed: Joseph W. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 
William Gashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 


a 




Secretary 
V OGUlX- «^^<lu»Ctt£c c ^- Chairman 


V 






1 



I 



;OMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 29, 1952, 4-:00 P.M., Dr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston, Mass, 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, 
Carmichael, Cashin, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter described the search which the 
University has made for a man to succeed Dean Machmer who is now 
on sick leave and who will reach compulsory retirement age in 
January of 1953* At the same time the University has also been 
searching for a man to fill the newly created position of Dean of 
Arts and Science. The President said that he had appointed two 
separate committees to search out candidates^ for the two positions 
As the search continued the two committees pooled their candidates 
and turned the work of selection over to a committee composed of 
the deans of the various schools of the University and headed by 
President Van Meter. 

The President said that the University found that it was 
unable to attract some of the most outstanding men because of the 
relatively low salaries of these positions. After searching all 
summer, the committee has agreed that the best man available to 
succeed Dean Machmer is J. Paul Mather who now holds the position 
of Staff Associate and Assistant Treasurer, American Council on 

Education. Mr. Mather is 37 years old, has received his B.S.C. 






Provost - 



J. Paul Mather 



1736 



COMMITTEE 



Dean of Arts 
and Science 



Charles F. 
Byers 



Promotion of 
Doric Alviani 



Promotion of 

Sidney W. 
Kauffman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

degree from the University of Denver School of Commerce, his M.B.A. 

from the University of Denver, College of Business Administration, 

and has completed most of the requirements for the doctor 1 s degree 

at Princeton. 

The committee also unanimously recommends the appointment 

of Charles F. Byers as Dean of Arts and Science. Dr. Byers is 

currently Acting Dean of the Graduate School of the University of 

Florida. He is 50 years old, received his A.B., M.S., and Ph.D. 

degrees from the University of Michigan. After discussion, the 

committee unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint J. Paul Mather as Provost of 
the University succeeding William L. 
Machmer effective January 1, 1953 or as 
soon thereafter as he can report for duty, 
at annual salary of $7980. 

The Committee unanimously 

VOTED ; To appoint Charles F. Byers as Dean of 

Arts and Science effective January 1, 1953 
or as soon thereafter as he can report for 
duty, at annual salary of $7930. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To promote Doric Alviani from Associate 
Professor of Music to Professor of Music 
effective September 1, 1952. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To promote Sidney ¥. Kauffman from 

Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion to Professor of Physical Education 
effective September 1, 1952. 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council 

and ©f President Van Meter, it was 



I 



OMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To approve awards of Lotta Crabtree Fellow- 
ships in the amount of $2,000 each to Hugo 
A. Jamnback, Jr. and to Albert Toczydlowski 
for the college year 1952-53* Both recipients 
are candidates for the doctor's degree at the 
University and both are majoring in Entomology. 

There was discussion of the Commonwealth Scholarships 
which were established by Chapter 524 of the Acts of 1951. Chair- 
man Bartlett pointed out that Chapter 524 says in part "A scholar- 
ship shall continue for such time as the recipient thereof remains 
a student in good standing at the University, but in no event shall 
any student receive such scholarship aid for more than four years." 
The Chairman expressed the view that the wording of this Act does 
not permit the Trustees or the University to withdraw a scholarship 
from a student while such student was in good standing at the 
University. The Chairman recalled that Dean Machmer last year had 
recommended the establishment of certain conditions which a stu- 
dent must satisfy in order to retain a Commonwealth scholarship be- 
yond one year. The conditions recommended by the Dean were 
approved by the Board of Trustees under date of February 14., 1952. 
The committee discussed this matter and unanimously 

VOTED : To rescind the action of the Board of 

Trustees under date of February 14, 1952 
which established conditions for con- 
tinuing Commonwealth scholarships after 
the freshman year. 

President Van Meter reported that the following students 

who had been awarded Commonwealth scholarships have withdrawn from 

the University or have indicated that they no longer plan to 

attend: 



1737 



Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowships 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



1738 



COMMITTEE 



Report on 

Scholarship 

Grants 



Franklin, Henry 
J. - Emeritus 



Eisenmenger, 
Walter S. - 
Emeritus 



Glatfelter, Guy 
V. - Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Gardiner, Donald S., 12 Concord Street, Keedham Heights 
MacLeish, James V., 16 Off Hill Street, East "Weymouth 
Edwards, Elizabeth B., 1 Roland Street, Middleboro 
Raymond, Robert M., 374- Somerville Avenue, Somerville 
Melamed, Ina, 76 Addison Street, Chelsea 
Boyle, William A., 142 June Street, Worcester 

It was 

VOTED : To withdraw awards of Commonwealth scholar- 
ships to the individuals named by the Pre si- 
dint and to award Commonwealth scholarships 
to the following named students instead. 

Bergeron, Dolores L. A., 31 River Street, Northboro 
Berman, Stanley G., 21 Alden Street, Quincy 
Hoss, William F., 37 Summer Street, Rockland 
Daley, Donald A., 25 Franklin Street, Wakefield 
Bartholomew, Barbara J., King Street, Norfolk 
Lewis, Evelyn E., 14. Pierce Street, Greenfield 

Dr. Carmichael suggested that it would be helpful to 
the Trustees if the President could prepare an annual report list- 
ing the recipients of all scholarships granted by the University, 
and it was 

VOTED : To request the President to present annually 
a report on all scholarship grants. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To name Henry J. Franklin, Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture effective upon 
his retirement - August 31, 1952. 

To name Walter S. Eisenmenger, Emeritus 
Research Professor of Agronomy effective 
on the date of his retirement - 
August 31, 1952. 

And to name Guy V. Glatfelter, Emeritus 
Placement Officer effective on the date 
of his retirement - August 31, 1952. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 



I 



OMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign a contract 
with Louis W. Ross for architectural services 
for the design and supervision of remodelling 
of dairy laboratories and processing areas in 
Flint Laboratory. The cost of this project 
is estimated at $4.5,000. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

# 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign a contract 
with the Department of the Navy at a tuition 
rate of $4.00 per year plus student fees for the 
education of naval personnel under the Naval 
Aviation College Program. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To establish a room rental rate of $121 per 
year when three women are assigned to a room 
at Lewis House for the 1952-53 year. 

Also on the recommendation of the President and the 

Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To reduce the room rental rate for all dormi- 
tory rooms by 20$ whenever the room is 
occupied above normal capacity. 

Chairman Bartlett reported for the special committee to 

locate candidates for the position of Business Manager. This 

committee, consisting of Trustees Bartlett, Brett and Cashin, has 

interviewed nine candidates. Dr. Bartlett said that the vacancy 

had been advertised in COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BUSINESS magazine 

which is circulated among college business officers. President 

Van Meter had also written to placement bureaus of a number of 

colleges and universities, particularly in the northeast, and had 

received some 30 to 4-0 inquiries or applications. The President, 

Treasurer and Secretary had read the applications and letters of 

recommendations and interviewed a number of the candidates. The 

Chairman said that his committee recommended the appointment of 



173' 



Remodelling 

Flint 

Laboratory 



Naval Aviation 
College Program 



Room Rental 
Rates 



Ludden, Hobart 
H. - 

Business 
Manager 



1740 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Hobart H. Ludden, who is new serving as Business Officer for the 

Danvers State Hospital. Mr. Ludden is 55 years old and received 

his bachelor's degree at Boston University. After discussion of 

the various candidates, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To appoint Hobart H. Ludden as Business* 
Manager of the University effective 
November 1, 1952 or as soon thereafter 
as he can report for duty, at annual 
salary of $6780. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:4-5 P.M. 





<- **? <C~ S ecretary 



ft qr«lx-Yi^ W-V5 Qj-eXXzUL 



Chairman 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
November 22, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst, Mass, 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, Cashin, 
McDermott, Vhitmore, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

This meeting was held concurrently with meetings of the 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the Executive Committee. 

It was 

VOTED ; To dispense vith reading of the. call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Haigis and Treasurer Johnson explained that the 
United States District Court has issued a decree calling for re- 
organization of the capital structures of the Philadelphia Company 
and the Duquesne Light Company. It is therefore necessary for the 
Trustees to exchange the 6% Preferred Stock of the Philadelphia 
Company for IS Preferred Stock of the Duquesne Light Company plus a 
cash payment. There will be no loss of capital through this ex- 
change. Chairman Haigis recommended that the exchange be made and 
if the Trustees do not later wish to hold the Duquesne stock, it 
may be sold. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 

Treasurer to exchange 80 shares of 6% Preferred 
Stock of the Philadelphia Company for 1$ Pre- 
ferred Stock of the Duquesne Light Company plus 
a cash payment in accordance with the decree of 
the U. S. District Court. 

Treasurer Johnson said that a delegation from Theta 

Corporation of Theta Chi Fraternity has applied for an increase in 



1741 



Shares 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



1742 



COMMITTEE 



Chi Omega 
Sorority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

their mortgage to cover a proposed building expansion program. 
The Tiustees now hold a 1$ mortgage with this Corporation with $8, 
outstanding at the present time. Regular amortization payments 



830 



are being made. The Corporation proposes to build an addition to 
its. property to house an additional l8 students and expects to raise 
approximately $1500 in contributions. Their application for a new 
mortgage is in the amount of $^8,000. 

Mr. Johnson pointed out that the Trustees now have in- 
vested approximately 22% of their endowments in fraternity and 
sorority mortgages. 

The Trustees agreed that mortgages on fraternities and 

sororities are among the best types of investment but felt that they 

could not afford to loan too large a proportion of the funds to any 

one house. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to inform the 
fraternity that the Trustees could not 
consider a loan in the amount of 1-4-3,000. 

Treasurer Johnson presented an application from Chi 
Omega Sorority for an increase in their mortgage to cover an addi- 
tion to their house already completed. The Trustees now hold a 
l& mortgage on this sorority in the amount of approximately $2,389* 
The sorority has built an addition to its kitchen costing approxi- 
mately $3»650 and aI *e $500 short of paying for the addition. They 
request that this amount be added to their 1$ mortgage. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize a 

$500 increase in the amount of the J+% mortgage 
on Chi Omega Sorority and authorize the 
Treasurer to complete the necessary arrange- 
ments. 



I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 




ecretary 



1 



1744 



COMMITTEE 



Bowker 
Auditorium 

Remodeling of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



November 22, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst, Masjs 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Haigis, McDermott, 
Whitmore, Cashin, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

This meeting was held concurrently with meetings of the 

Trustee Committee on Finance and the Executive Committee 

It was 

VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Whitmore said that it was necessary for the 
Trustees to select an architect for the remodeling of Bowker Audi- 
torium for which the Trustees have an appropriation of |236,000. He 
recalled that the Trustees at the request of the Public Building 
Commission had recommended that the firm McClintock and Craig of 
Springfield be hired for the purpose of preparing preliminary 
studies. After this recommendation was made, the Public Building- 
Commission appointed Saul E. Moffie of Boston. Mr. Moffie' s con- 
tract with the Public Building Commission specified that he was to 
be paid for making plans and that there was no obligation that he 
be employed further in connection with the project. It was also 
specified that the plans could be used in any way that the Common- 
wealth saw fit. 



Treasurer Johnson reported that the work of those em- 
ployed by Mr. Moffie was not satisfactory to the University. After 
discussion, it was 



I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees employ archi- 
tects for remodeling of Bowker Auditorium in 
the following order of choice: 

1. McClintock and Craig of Springfield 

2. Alderman and MacNeish of Holyoke 

3. Hampson and. Fisher of Pittsfield 



i 



I 



I 



Chairman Whitmore said that the Public Building 

Commission has offered to provide funds for the employment of 

architects to make preliminary studies of certain of the projects 

listed in the University 1 s capital outlay program and for which 

funds have not been appropriated. The purpose of these preliminary 

studies would be to determine the ultimate cost of the building. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees nominate 
architects for the preparation of preli- 
minary plans to be paid for by the Public 
Building Commission for buildings as 
follows : 

1. Remodeling of Draper Hall 

1st choice - Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield 
2nd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 
3rd choice - Alderman and MacNeish of Holyoke 

2. Women's Physical Education Building (new ) 

1st choice - Perry, Shaw & Hepburn, Kehoe and 

Dean of Boston 
2nd choice - Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 

Abbott of Boston 
3rd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 

3» Chemistry Building (addition) 

1st choice - Apple ton and Stearns of Boston 
2nd choice - Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield 
3rd choice - Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 
Abbott of Boston 

U* Classroom Building (new) 

1st choice - Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 

Abbott of Boston 
2nd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 
3rd choice - Perry, Shaw and Hepburn, Kehoe and 

Dean of Boston 



Draper Hall - 
remodeling 

Women's Physical 
Education Build- 
ing 



Chemistry 
Building- 



Class room 
Building 



1746 



COMMITTEE 



Durfee 
Plant House 



Alpha Sigma Phi 
Fraternity 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman "Whitmore recalled that the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds had previously considered a site for a new glass house 
to replace the Durfee Range and for which the Legislature has appro- 
priated $70,000. The committee had hoped to obtain a private gift 
to supplement this amount but has been unsuccessful. The firm of 
Lord and Burnham has stated that it can construct for the amount 
of $70,000 a glass house with a curvilinear central portion measuring 
58 by 4-0 feet and with sections extending on each end from the 
center measuring 50 x 25 feet each. The committee is satisfied that 
the house is the best that can be obtained for the money. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 

design proposed by Lord and Burnham Company 

and to locate this new glass house on the south side 

of the present Durfee Range and as near to the 

present house as possible. It is understood 

that the old Durfee House will.be removed as 

soon as the new house is completed. 

It was also 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
George Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds to prepare the necessary archi- 
tectural studies for the new plant house. 

President Van Meter reported that Mr. Edwin F. Gaskill, 
speaking for Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity, has stated that the cor- 
poration could not accept an offer of $4,000 for its property on 
the corner of Stockbridge Road and Clark Hill Road. The corpora- 
tion insists on a sale figure of $5? 000 and has stated that it in- 
tends to use the $5? 000 for the creation of a $10,000 endowment for 
scholarships to be turned over to the Trustees. The University 
budget for capital outlay requests an amount of $4->000 for purchase 

of this property. After discussion, it was 



1 



IOMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Administration to increase the capital out- 
lay budget request for the purchase of the 
Alpha Sigma Phi property from $4, 000 to 
$5,000. 

President Van Meter said that with the present and ex- 
pected growth of the University, it will be necessary in the near 
future to construct two additional dormitories. He proposed that 
legislation be entered this winter seeking authorization for this 
construction and that the Trustees study expected enrollments again 
in the spring before authorizing construction. After discussion, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request the 
Massachusetts Building Association to seek 
legislation for the purpose of constructing 
two additional self -liquidating dormitories 
on the University campus to be ready by 
September of 1954-* 

Chairman "Whitmore said that the Trustees have authorized 

Appleton and Stearns to prepare architectural studies and designs 

for completion of the Engineering Building and that it is now T 

necessary for a contract to be signed. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to sign contract with Appleton and 
Stearns in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees for architectural services for the 
design of completion of the Engineering 
Building. 

Treasurer Johnson said that it is necessary to move cer- 
tain small wooden poultry houses from their present location near 
the old Paige Laboratory to a new location near the new Paige 
Laboratory and after discussion, it was 



1747 



Dormitories 



Engineering 
Building 



Poultry 
Houses 



1748 



COMMITTEE 



Animal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize that 
these buildings be moved to a location across 
the road from the new Paige Laboratory. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept as com- 
pleted on November 7, 1952 the Animal Disease 
Isolation Building subject to the completion 
of certain minor details to the satisfaction 
of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
and the Treasurer. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 J 30 P.M. 




ii . i ' ■ T li ll 



JSecretary 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
November 22, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst, Mass 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



1749 



I XUJU, 



Trustees Bartlett, Cashin, Whitmore, 

McDermott, Haigis, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to exchange 30 
shares of 6% Preferred Stock of the Phila- 
delphia Company for L$ Preferred Stock of 
the Duquesne Light Company plus a cash pay- 
ment in accordance with the decree of the 
U. S. District Court. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance!, 



Shares 



it was 



VOTED : To authorise the Treasurer to inform the 

Theta Chi Fraternity that the Trustees could 
not consider a loan in the amount of $4-3,000, 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance 



it was 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



VOTED: 



increase in the amount of 



To authorize a 
the i$ mortgage on Chi Omega Sorority and 
authorize the Treasurer to complete the 
necessary arrangements. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee C . littee on Build- 



ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To nominate architects to the Public Build- 
ing Commission for remodeling of Bowker 
Auditorium In the following order of choice: 

1. McClintock and Craig of Springfield 

2. Alderman and /lacNeish of Holyoke 

3. Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield 



Chi Omega 
Sorority 



Bowker 
Auditorium 

remodeling 



1750 



COMMITTEE 



Draper Hall 
Remodeling of 



Women 1 s 

Physical Educa- 
tion Building 



Chemistry- 
Building - 
addition 



Classroom 
Building 



Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Public Building 
Commission employ architects for the 
preparation of preliminary plans for 
buildings as follows: 

1. Remodeling of Draper Hall 

1st choice - Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield 
2nd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 
3rd choice - Alderman and MacNeish of Holyoke 

2. Yomen's Physical Education Building (new ) 

1st choice - Perry, Shaw & Hepburn, Kehoe and 
Dean of Boston i 

2nd choice - Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 
Abbott of Boston 

3rd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 

3. Chemistry Building (addition) 



1st choice 
2nd choice 
3rd choice 



- A.ppleton and Stearns of Boston 

- Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield 

- Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 
Abbott of Boston 



4-. Classroom Building (new) 

1st choice - Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 

Abbott of Boston 
2nd choice - Maloney and Tessier of Springfield 
3rd choice - Perry, Shaw and Hepburn, Kehoe and 

Dean of Boston 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To request the Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion to seek legislation for the purpose of 
constructing two additional self-liquidating 
dormitories on the University campus to be 
ready by September of 1954-* 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 



:OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To accept the design proposed by Lord and 
Burnham Company for replacement of the 
Durfee Plant House and to locate this new 
glass house on the south side of the present 
house and as near it as possible. It is 
understood that the old Durfee House will 
be removed as soon as the new house is com- 
pleted. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize George Brehm, Superintendent 
of Buildings and Grounds to prepare the 
necessary architectural studies for the new 
plant house. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to increase 
the capital outlay budget request for the 
purchase of the Alpha Sigma Phi property 
from $4,000 to £5,000. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract 
, i xv Appleton and Stearns in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees for architectural 
services for the design of completion of the 
Engineering Building. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To authorize that certain small wooden poultry 
houses near the old Paige Laboratory be moved 
to a location across the road from the new Paige 
Laboratory* 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Bui 1 

ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept as completed on November 7, 1952 the 
Animal Disease Isolation Building subject to 
the completion of certain minor details to the 
satisfaction of the Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds and the Treasurer. 



1751 



Durfee Plant 
House 



Alpha. Sigma 
Phi Fraternity 



Engineering 
Building 



Poultry 
Houses 



jgnimal Disease 

Isolation 

Building 



1752 



COMMITTEE 



State Home 

Demonstration 

Leader 



Winifred I. 
Eastwood 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter explained that the position of State 
Home Demonstration Leader has been vacant for about one year follow- 
ing the resignation of Miss Beatrice Billings. This position pro- 
vides leadership for rll the extension work in Home Economics in 
Massachusetts. Miss Winifred I. Eastwood, County Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent in Dutchess County New York with headquarters in 
Poughkeepsie, has been strongly recommended by committees consist- 
ing of the following: Dr. Dale H. Sieling, Dean of Agriculture 
and Director of the Experiment Station; Dr. Helen S. Mitchell, 
Dean of Home Economics at the University; James W. Dayton, Director 
of the Extension Service; H. Sidney Vaughan, State County Agent 



Leader; Horace M. Jones, State 4-H Club Leader; Donald P. Allan, 

Secretary of the Extension Service; Harold A. Mostrom, Director of 

the Essex County Agricultural School; Allen S. Leland, Manager of 

Hampshire County Extension Service; Molly M. Higgins, County Home 

Demonstration Agent in Hampden County (representing the County 

Home Demonstration Agents) . 

Miss Eastwood is a native of Nebraska, was graduated 

from Sterling College, Sterling, Kansas in 1930, attended summer 

school at Iowa State College and the University of Wisconsin and 

has received a Master's degree from Columbia Teachers' College in 

194-7. After discussion it was unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Miss Winifred I. Eastwood as 

State Home Demonstration Leader effective 
January 1, 1953 at annual salary of $6,130. 



fl 



iOMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter said that with the retirement of 
Walter Eisenmenger, Professor of Agronomy, there has been a 
vacancy of this grade in the ' Experiment Station. Under present 
policy of the University, it is not necessary to fill the position 
in the department in which the vacancy occurs. A professorship 
may be transferred to whatever department can make the best use of 
the position. A present employee may be elevated or a new person 
may be brought in. The President said that after careful con- 
sideration, he is recommending that Dr. Emmett Bennett, now 
Assistant Research Professor of Chemistry, be promoted to Research 
Professor of Chemistry. Dr. Bennett has been in the employ of 
the University since 1930 and has been Assistant Professor since 
1936. During a period of leave, he obtained his Doctor's degree 
from Pennsylvania State College and through the years has made 
substantial contributions to the scientific literature in his 
field of Plant Chemistry. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To promote Dr. Burnett Bennett from Assistant 
research Professor to Research Professor of 
Chemistry effective January 1, 1953 at annual 
salary of $6,130. 

It was 



VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarship in the 
amount of $250 yearly to Bernard Stephen 
Cudak of Adams, Massachusetts beginning 
with the academic year 1952-53 and to withdraw 
similar award from Donald A. Daley who did 
not matriculate at the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To name Edwin F. Gaskill Emeritus Assistant 
Professor of Agronomy effective on the date 
of his retirement, February 29, 1952. 



Emmett Bennett 



Promotion 



Commonwealth 
Scholarship 



Gaskill, Edwin 
F. - Emeritus 



1754 



COMMITTEE 



Sanctuary, 
William C. 

sabbatical 
leave 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

fOTED: To authorize sabbatical leave during the 

second semester of the academic year 1952- 
53 to Professor William C. Sanctuary of 
the -Poultry Department to complete certain 
research projects in poultry end to finish 
writing a text book on "Poultry Breeding 
Practices" which has been accepted for 
publications . 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 





,«£W=«U^ 



Secretary 



Chairman 



I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
AGRICULTURE MD HORTICULTURE 

February 12, 1953, 9:30 A.M., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 
PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Brown, Broderick, Crowley, 

Bartlett, Pres. Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, 
It was Dr. Sieling, Secretary Burke 



VOTED: 



To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of the minutes of the last meet- 



ing. 



175, 



Poultry 
Diseases 



Dr. Sieling explained that poultrymen of the state are 
now able to innoculate their own flocks against certain diseases. 
The method of innoculation has been perfected to the point where 
it is no longer necessary to have this work done by trained indi- 
viduals sent out by the University. On the recommendation of 
Dr. Sieling and President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

discontinuance of the program of innocula- 
tion of poultry against infectious bronchi- 
tis through field workers sent out by the 
University and in its stead the University 
be authorised to distribute vials of virus 
at $5*00 per vial so that poultrymen may 
innoculate their own flocks. 

Dr. Sieling said that since 1924- the Trustees have re- Technical 

Bulletins 
quired the University to charge for technical bulletins sent out- 
side the Commonwealth. Four of the New England states no longer 
make such a charge and the fifth, Vermont, is willing to discon- 
tinue its charge if Massachusetts does. The charge has been five 
cents a bulletin and it costs more than this amount to collect 
the fee. Total distribution amounts to about $6.00 worth of bulls 
tins each month. After discussion and upon the recommendation of 
President Van Meter, it was 



1756 



COMMITTEE 



Agricultural 
Teachers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the University to discontinue the charge 
of five cents now made for distribution 
of technical bulletins outside the 
Commonwealth . 

Dr. Sieiing outlined a proposal for further unification 
of the agricultural services under his direction. The University 
now employs full time teachers of agriculture whose appointment 
under the law is for the academic year. The University also em- 
ploys full time extension workers in agriculture, full time research 
workers and full time control service personnel on a 12 months' 
basis. Dr. Sieiing said that after careful study he is convinced 
that greater service could be rendered to the agricultural industry 
if professional workers in agriculture could contribute in any of 
the four fields enumerated above and not confine their endeavors to 
one. Thus an outstanding plant pathologist would be able to com- 
bine teaching of plant pathology with research or with extension 
work in that field. 

As a corollary of this unification, it would be necessary 
to increase the salary of the agricultural teachers so that their 
services might be employed for 12 months rather than 9 months of 
the year. Teachers now receive the same pay for 9 months that the 
other agricultural workers receive for 12 months. 

For many years at the University, those on 12 months 1 em- 
ployment received more pay than those on 9 months' employment. 
The differential was abolished about 1^4-6 when salaries were in- 
creased substantially at the request of the Eoard of Trustees and 
with the permission of the Legislature. 



DMMITTEE 



1757 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

If the 9 months 1 teachers are required to work 12 months, 
their pay should be increased, Dr. Sieling said, by about 15%. 
There are 50 such teachers. At the same time it would be 
necessary to increase by about 15% the pay of the professional 
agricultural workers already serving on a 12 months' basis. 
Dr. Van Meter pointed out that it would be necessary to increase 
the salaries of 17 members of the administrative staff of the 
University who also work 12 months and whose salaries should be 
maintained in their present relation to the salaries of agricultural 
workers . 

Chairman Bartlett pointed out that it would be necessary 

to change state law to permit teachers to be employed for the full 

year and to be paid on a 12 months' basis. After discussion and 

on the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
idea of employment of persons whose duties 
shall consist of a combination of teaching, 
research, extension or control law activity 
and to authorize the University to take the 
proper steps to make legal provision for 
this kind of employment and for the proper 
adjustment of the compensation of agricul- 
tural and administrative employees of the 
University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:15 A.M. 




Secretary 



1758 



COMMITTEE 



Byers, Charles 
F. 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Colby, Byron E. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TF.USTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 12, 1953, 11:25 A.M., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Commissioner Desmond presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Desmond, McNamara, Donohue, 
Bartlett, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

In the absence of Dr. Carmichael, Commissioner Desmond 
was elected to serve as temporary chairman. 

President Van Meter said that C. F. Byers, who was 
appointed by the Trustees as Dean of the College of Arts and 
Science, took so long to decide whether to come that the President 
found it necessary to withdraw the appointment. On the recommen- 
dation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To withdraw the appointment of C. F. 
Byers as Dean of the College of Arts 
and Science. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the following sabbatical leaves on the 
condition that funds are available and 
that each individual will submit a 
written statement to the President agree- 
ing to return to the University for a 
period of at least one full year after 
the expiration of the sabbatical leave. 

1. Byron E. Colby, Extension Professor of Animal 
Husbandry, for 3 months in the summer of 1953 
and 3 months in the summer of 1954- with full 
pay to work on a master's degree in animal 
breeding and nutrition. 



I 



5MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2. Mrs. N. May Larson, Extension Professor of Chile! 
Development, for the period September 1 through 
November 30, 1953 with full pay for study in 
accordance vith a program to be approved by the 
President. 

3. Eobert S. Feldman, Assistant Professor of 
Psychology, for the first semester of the college 
year 1953-54 at full pay for study at Harvard 
University. 

4-. Philip L. Gamble, Professor of Economics, for one 
semester of the college year 1953-54- at full pay 
for research and study. 

5. Oreana A. Merriam, Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, for the second semester of the college 
year 1953-54- at full pay for research and study at 
Tulane University. 

6. Arthur B. Musgrave, Professor of Journalism, for 
one year beginning September 1, 1953 at half pay 
for study and waiting probably at the University 
of Wisconsin. 

7. Albert B. Kelson, Assistant Professor of Geology, 
for the first semester of the college year 1953-54- 
at full pay to complete his doctoral thesis. 

3. Victor A. Pice, Head of the Department of Animal 
Husbandry, for the first semester of the college 
year 1953-54- at full pay for study at North 
Carolina State College. 

9. N. James Schoonmaker, Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics, for the second semester of the college 
year 1953-54- at full pay to complete requirements 
for the degree Doctor of Philosophy at the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh. 

10. Frederick S. Troy, Professor of English, for one 
year beginning September 1, 1953 at half pay for 
research and writing. 

11. Olga M. Olesiuk, Assistant Research Professor of 
Veterinary Science for one year at half pay be- 
ginning September 1, 1953 for research work in the 
field of respiratory diseases of poultry. 



Larson, Mrs. N. 
May 



Feldman, Eobert 
S. 



Gamble, Philip 
L. 



Merriam, Oreana 
A. 



Musgrave, 
Arthur B. 



Nelson, Albert 
B. 



Fd.ce, Victor 
A. 



Schoonmaker, 
N. James 



TFroy, 

Frederick S. 



Olesiuk, 
Olga M. 



i ri r / » 



1760 



COMMITTEE 



Terms of 
Employment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter said that the appointment foim 

approved by the Trustees for the employment of resident teachers 

states that the annual period of service, for resident teachers is 

10 months. This seems to be contrary to the provisions of 

Chapter 29, Section 31 of the General Laws and is contrary to the 

actual practice at the University. After discussion and on the 

recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the following change in the terms of em- 
ployment for resident teachers. Delete 
paragraph 1+ of the terms as stated on the 
employment form which reads "The annual 
period of service of resident teachers is 
10 months." Insert in place of this sen- 
tence the following sentence: "The annual 
period of service of resident teachers is 
for the academic year." 

President Van Meter said that the appointment form for 
members of the professional staff other than teachers states that 
the annual period of service of members of the professional staff 
other than resident teachers is 11 months. One staff member re- 
signed, after 11 months and requested his pay for the 12th month. 
The President said that to avoid misunderstanding, it might be 
better to change the form and on his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following change in the terms of employment 
for members of the professional staff of the 
University other than the resident teachers. 
Delete paragraph 4- of the terms as stated on 
the employment form which reads "The annual 
period of service of members of the professional 
staff other than resident teachers is 11 months." 
Insert in place of this sentence the following 
sentence: "The annual period of service of 
members of the professional staff other than 
resident teachers is 12 months, with vacation 
of one month allowed in each year of service." 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the President and after 

discussion of the program and courses, it was* 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
University to offer a program of study in 
Piychology leading to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

It was 

70 TED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
following new courses of study: 

Psychology 204. Learning II — A consideration of the im- 
plications of the basic laws of learning for explaining 
complex behavior. Given in alternate years beginning 
1953-54. Prerequisite, Psychology 203. Credit, 3. 

Psychology 207. Systematic Psychology — An analysis of 
the general structure of psychological theory, and an 
historical and comparative consideration of the back- 
grounds, viewpoints on scientific methodology, research 
interests and techniques, and the component variables, 
hypotheses, and laws of structural, Gestalt, functional, 
and behavioristic movements. Given in alternate years 
beginning 1954-55- Credit, 3. 

Psychology 210 « Emotion and Motivation ■ — A study of the 
nature, determinants, and Interrelationships of emotion 
and motivation, and of the techniques involved in in- 
vestigating these phenomena. Given in alternate years, 
beginning 1954-55. Credit, 3. 

Psychology 214. Test Construction II — The use of corre- 
lational and analysis of variance techniques in test con- 
struction. The class will statistically analyze a test 
which they have constructed. Prerequisite, Psychology 213. 

Credit, 3. 

Psychology 252, Projective Methods II — Basic interpretive 
procedures of projective devices with emphasis upon the 
Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 251. Credit, 3- 

Psychology 253, Advanced Clinical Psychology I — 
Diagnosis. Application of the principles and techniques 
of psychological diagnosis to the individual case. Given 
in alternate years, beginning 1954-55. Prerequisites, 
Psychology 235, 252. Credit, 3. 



f^j f$ 



Psychology 



New Courses 



1762 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Psychology 271 , Advanced Industrial Psychology I — Human 
relations in industry. Applications of general and 
social psychological findings to industry and business, 
with a concentration en the interdependence of morale, 
leadership and motivation. Given in alternate years, 
beginning 1953-54* Prerequisite, Psychology 186, or the 
consent of the instructor. Credit, 



3. 



Sociology 



New Courses 



Psychology 283. 234. Practicum — Practice in the appli- 
cation of psychological techniques to the following areas 
of psychology; child, clinical, guidance and counseling, 
industrial, and social. Either semester may be elected 
independently. Credit, 3-12 

Psychology 295. 296, Pesearch Methodology — A study and 
evaluation of research methods and of problems in the 
major fields of psychology. Conducted in conjunction with 
the weekly Departmental Seminar. Two semesters are re- 
quired of students studying toward the doctorate. 

Credit, 2. 
each semester. 

Psychology £00. Doctor's Thesis . — Research, and the 
preparation of an acceptable thesis. Credit, 30. 

On the recommendation of the President and after 

discussion of the program and courses, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
University to offer a program of study in 
Sociology leading to the degree Master of 
Arts. 

It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
following new courses of study: 

Sociology 214 II. Criminology — A consideration of 
criminological theories, past and present. Special em- 
phasis on present research trends as they relate to 
theoretical formulations. Offered in alternate years, 
beginning 1952-53. Prerequisite Sociology 78, or 
equivalent. Credit, 3< 

Sociology 217 I. Juvenile Delinquency — Causes; problems 
of adjustment; recidivism; treatment. Offered in alternate 
years, beginning 1953-54. Prerequisite Sociology 73, or 
equivalent. 



Credit, 3 



^ • 



Sociology 268 II, Industrial Sociology — A study of the 
role, status, and function of the worker in the industrial 
community. A consideration of the impact of technological 
change on the community. Prerequisite Economics 79 • 



J 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Sociology 281 I, History of Sociological Theory — A 
survey of the literature from classical times to Herbert 
Spencer. Prerequisite Sociology 82, or equivalent. 

Credit, 3« 

Sociology 2S2 II, Contemporary Sociological Theory — 
A survey of the literature from Herbert Spencer to the 
present. Prerequisite Sociology 82, or equivalent. 

Credit, 3. 

Sociology 291 I. Social Change — Emphasis is placed upon 
planned innovations and reforms in political, religious, 
and economic areas and upon the possibilities and problems 
of social planning. Consideration is also given to social 
changes resulting indirectly from invention and group con- 
tact. Admission by consent of the instructor. Credit, 3. 

Sociology 300. Thesis Credit, 9. 

On the recommendation of the President and after 

discussion of the program and courses, it was 

OTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
University to offer an undergraduate major in 
Music . 

It was recommended that the Trustees approve the follow- 
ing curriculum in Music and require that students majoring in 
Music take private lessons in addition to the courses prescribed 
for the major to fulfill a professional training requirement, the 
number and kind of lessons to be approved by the major adviser: 

Music 25 and 26, Fundamentals of Music — A study of the 
structure of music for appreciative, executive, and 
creative purposes, to meet the practical needs of the 
listener, performer, or creator. Sight, Singing, Ear- 
Training, and Keyboard Practice will be used to give 
context to the acquired music theory. All music majors 
will be required to study piano while following this 
course. 1 Class hour, 2 Two hour laboratories (each 
semester) Credit, 3» 

each semester. 

• Music 75 and 76, Music Theory — The development of skill 
in the use of the fundamentals of music. Elementary and 
advanced harmony are studied practiced. Techniques of 
Elementary Counterpoint are presented to show the rela- 
tionship to vocal and instrumental music. 2 Class hours, 
1 Two hour laboratory (each semester) Credit, 3. 

• each semester. 



1763 



Music 



New Courses 



1764 



COMMITTEE 



Botany- 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Music 7 7 and 73, Form : 1^ j — An approach to 

the study of music through observation of its form, 
an analysis of it,: rhyt] is, ie] ii , nd ! a nies as 
used in the instrumental focal compositions of the 

.rious periods of music history. The theory of con- 
ducting is discussed, studied, evaluated, and its 
techniques practiced. 1 Class hour, 2 Two hour labora- 
tories (each semester) Credit, 3- 

. each semester 

Music 79, Score Reading: and Analysis — Through listen- 
ing and reading assignments, the characteristics of 
voices and instruments are studied and the results are 
applied to arranging for vocal and instrumental groups 
of various types, sizes, and combinations. 3 Class 
hours. Credit, 3. 

Music 80. Score Reading; and Composition — A continuation 
of Music 79* In this course the student is expected to 
study the methods and materials of original composition. 
Procedures for processing, printing, publishing, and 
marketing are evaluated. Laws and regulations governing 
performance, publication of composition, and use of per- 
sonnel are discussed. 3 Class hours. Credit, 3» 

Music 31. Music and Hi story — A survey of the periods 
in music history attempting to transport the student into 
the spirit of each of the great periods of music — 
Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, and Modern - - 
so that he will feel their quality, understand their en- 
thusiasms, their technical resources and limitations, and 
their habits of thoughts and style. 3 Class hours. 

Credit, 3. 

Music 82. Music and Research Methods — An orientation 



com. b 

all s 

sourc 

work 

tion 

area 

3 Cla 



se in the manner of a seminar and is recommended to 



tudents interested in bibliography, references, 

e materials, rental libraries, etc. who expect to 

in the field of music or related fields. In addi- 

to compilation, the student will investigate a special 

of study and report the findings in written form. 

ss hours. Credit, 3. 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

'OTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

following new undergraduate courses of study 
and the discontinuance of Botany 53- 

Botany 30 » Plant Anatomy — A study of the origin and 
structure of vegetative and reproductive organs of 
seed plants. Prerequisites Botany 1, Botany 25 
recommended. 2 Class hours; 1 two-hour laboratory. 

Credit, 3>, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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1766 



COMMITTEE 

New .Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the following new courses of study: 

Business Administratio n 20 1, Accounting; Theory in 
Management — The theory of accounts applied to manage- 
ment problems; the established methods of accounting in 
operating situations; the use of quantitative data as 
bases for policy decisions. Credit, 2>, 

Business Administration 211, The Business Enterprise — 
The legal-economic-political environment in which busi- 
ness enterprise operates; the risks of enterprise and 
profits; market demand analysis; cost-price combinations 
and production policies; the effects of business fluctua- 
tions on the individual enterprise; the enterprise system 



and public policy as expressed in 



legislation. 



Credit, 3< 



Business Administration 222. Marketing; Management — A 
study of the function of marketing from the point of view 
of the business executive. The broad aspects of product 
planning and choice of channels of distribution as well 
as distribution problems are analyzed. The interrelations 
between research planning, execution and control of market- 
ing activity is carefully considered. Credit, 3- 

Business Administration 231. Financial Management — 
Attention is first centered on financing current opera- 
tions: financial analysis and planning; credit management; 
and the sources and management of working capital. Then, 
long-term financial policies are stressed: the forms and 
uses of corporate securities; the capital structure; sur- 
plus and dividend policies; financing new enterprises; the 
recapitalization and reorganization of going concerns. 

Credit, 3- 

Business Administration 24-2, Production and Personnel 
Management — This course deals with the situations which 
confront executives in charge of manufacturing operations 
and the direction of people at work. It is designed to 
develop skill in analyzing production processes in order 
to determine specific adaptations of production and per- 
sonnel techniques that best satisfy the particular require- 
ments of differing processes. Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 252, Problems in Business Ad- 
ministration — Assuming a knowledge of departmental 
organization in business, this course covers policy for- 
mation at the top level of management. Consideration is 
given to the principles and techniques by which executives 
develop and integrate the work of their various depart- 
ments. Students apply the theories to actual cases. 

Credit, 3. 



1 



OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Business Administration 271, Seminar in Business Ad- 
ministration I — A critical and intensive study of se- 
lected problems in Accounting, Finance, Industrial Ad- 
ministration, or Marketing and the application of re- 
search methods to these problems. Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 272, Seminar in Business Ad- 
ministration II — A continuation of the Seminar in Busi- 
ness Administration in the field of the student's special 
interest. Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 300, Thesis , Master's degree. 

Credit, 3 
or 6. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VQT3D : To recommend that the Trustees name 
William L. Ma earner, Dean of the Uni- 
versity, Emeritus, effective on the 
date of his retirement January 31 > 1953. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it "was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study endorse the following 
resolution to the Board of Trustees: 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts express .their deepest appreciation of the faithful and 
effective leadership of William L. Machmer during his long period 
of service to the University, both as teacher and Dean. 

He came to the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1911- 
as instructor in mathematics. Students soon came to know him as 
an exceptionally fine teacher. His contagious enthusiasm for his 
favorite subject, coupled with an unusual knack for clear pre- 
sentation of difficult problems won for him a place of high esteem 
among his students and fellows in the teaching profession. He was 
more than teacher, however. He was a friend, taking sympathetic 
interest in all the problems of young people. He possessed 
patience, a wholesome optimism and sound judgment in dealing with 
the many trying situations that confront college students. He 
gave unselfishly of his time not only to help them in their 
mathematical problems but also with those more important personal 
ones that so often torment them. 

His success in counseling early brought him into the 
administrative work of the University. As Dean from 1926 to 1953 
he was responsible for the resident instruction program of the 
University as well as the guidance of its student body. His un- 
flinching insistence upon high scholastic standards resulted in 
the fine academic reputation the University has enjoyed over his 
long period of leadership. 



1767 



Machmer, 
William L, 

Emeritus 



Resolution on 
Dean Machmer 



1768 



COMMITTEE 



Cahill, 
Fred B. 



Appointments, 
Promotions and 
Retirements 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Both positions, teacher and Dean, demanded increasing 
amounts of his time, thought and energy. To both he has ever 
been loyal. 

The Board of Trustees in recognizing Dean Machmer' s 1+2 
years of faithful service to the University, extend to him, upon 
his retirement, their gratitude and best wishes. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees appoint 

Fred B. Cahill, Jr. as Professor of Govern- 
ment beginning September 1, 1953 at annual 
salary of £6130. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 

attached report on Appointments, Promotions 
and Retirements. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:43- P.M. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 
List of Professional Appointments, Promotions, Retirements, Resignations 

January 1 - December 31, 1952 

APPOINTMENTS 

Instruction N^ 

Luther A, Allen, Instructor in Government, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Regina Bouin, Instructor in Physical Education for Women, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Frances E. Camp, Instructor in Physical Education for Women, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Joseph D* Campbell, Instructor Olericulture, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Ann £, Carlin, Assistant professor of Education, $4,560, September 29, 1952 

James W. Chadwick, Jr., Instructor in Animal Husbandry, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Harry J* Christoffers, Instructor in Chemistry, $3, 720, September 29, 1952 

Armand J. Costa, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, $3,720, February 1, 1952 

Thomas A. Culbertson ? Assistant Professor of Food Technology , $4,560, September 1, 1952 

Robert T. Curran, Assistant professor of Physical Education, $4,560, October 1, 1952 

A. George Davis, Instructor in Mathematics, $3*720, September 1, 1952 

Russell R. Dutcher, Instructor in Geology & Mineralogy, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Enio Feliciotti, Instructor in Food Technology, 13,720, September 1, 1952 

Roy M. Fisher, Assistant professor of Physics, $-4,560, September 1, 1952 

Paul A. Gagnon, Instructor in History, $3,820, September 1, 1952 

Chester S. Gladchuk, Assistant Football Coach, $5,220, March 10, 1952 

Richard Haven, Instructor in English, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Sarah L. Haves, Instructor in Home Economics, $3,7&0, September 1, 1952 

William F. Higgins, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, ^3,720, September 1, 1952 

William L. Ives, Instructor in Floriculture, $1^B60 September 1, 1952 (1/2 time) 

C. Wendell King, Assistant professor of Sociology, $4,560, September 1, 1952 

Robert Mo Kingdon, Instructor in History, $3*720, September 1, 1952 

Donald M« Kinsman, Assistant to Superintendent of Farm, £4,200,. June 2, 1952 

Lionel LaBarge, Instructor in Romance Languages, $1,24.0, September 1, 1952 (1/3 time) 

Henry A. Lea, Instructor in German, |3,720, September 1, 1952 

Robert W. Lentilhon, Instructor in Business Administration, 03,720, September 1, 1952 

Herbert E. Lindner, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Marian J. Liotta, Instructor in Romance Languages, $1,240, September 1, 1952 (1/3 time) 

Oscar I. Li toff, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, £4,560, September 1, 1952 

Hobart H. Ludden, Business Manager, $7,330, December 1, 1952 

Manley Mandel, Instructor in Bacteriology, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Bernard Mausner, Assistant professor of Psychology, $4, 560, September 1, 1952 

Hugfc Montgomery, Librarian, £6,130, September 1, 1952 

Otto P. Pflanze, Assistant professor of History, $4,560, September 1, 1952 

Valdemars punga, Instructor in Mathematics, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Cedric W. Richards, Assistant professor of Civil Engineering, *?4,560, September 1, 1952 

John L. Roberts, Instructor in Psysiology, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Richard C* Savage, Instructor in Speech, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Henry H. Scarborough, Jr., Instructor in Botany, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Donald S. Scheufele, Instructor in Chemistry, $3,720, October 1, 1952 

Adolph E. Schroeder, Assistant professor of German, $4,560, September 1, 1952 



Appointments 

Popkin Shenian, Instructor in Chemistry, $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Qddvar Solstad, Instructor in Chemical Engineering; $3,720, September 1, 1952 

Leo F. Solt, Instructor in History, $3*720, September 1, 1952 

Stephen, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, $3,720, September 1, 1952 
James To Timberlake, Assistant professor of Animal Husbandry, $4,560, September 1, 1952 
Glenn E* Tinder, Instructor in Government, $3*720, September 1, 1952 
Wallace W. Turner, Assistant Physician, $5,880, September 1, 1952 

Stanley Vance, Associate Professor of Industrial Administration, #5,220, Sept. 1, 1952 
Theodore J. Wang, Assistant professor of Physics, $4,560, September 1, 1952 
Neal T, Watson 1 *. Instructor in Mathematics, $3,720, September 1, 1952 
Donald E. VJestcott, Instructor in Food Technology, $3,720, September 1, 1952 
Tersne® H Wilbur, Instructor in German, $3,720, September 1, 1952 
Judi- 1, Instructor in Romance Languages, $1,240, September i, 1952 (1/3 time) 

Experiment Station 

Thomas V. Fox, Instructor, Research, Poultry Husbandry, $3,720, September 15, 1952 
Joseph E. Gray, Assistant Prof* Research, Animal Disease Control, $4,560,- Feb. 15, 1952 
Anthony Lopez, Associate Prof • Research, Food Technology, $5,220, September 23, 1952 
John W« Mastalers, Assistant Prof, Itesearch, Floriculture, 64,560, September 1, 1952 
Richard E* Pride, Assistant prof. Research, Horticulture, $4,560, Marco 24, 1952 
latfoan Lo Shipkovitz,. Assto Prof, tasearch, Bureau of Animal Industry, $4,560, Sept .1,1952 
Charles F. ginyser, Jr., Instructor, Research, Veterinary Science, $3,720j Jul;.- 1, 1952 
Richard J* Stadtherr, Asst. Prof. Research, Nursery Culture, 04, 560, October 15, 1952 

Extension Service 

William D. Alford, Assistant Extension Prof., Extension Editor, &4, 

Virginia Davis, Assistant Professor, Extension, Home Economics, $4, 

eak Wright, Assistant professor. Extension, Dairy Husbandry, $4,5 



Instruction 

Doric Alviani, professor of Music from Associate Professor 

Thomas J. Andrews, Assistant Professor of. Zoology from Instructor 

John II. Dittfach, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering from Assistant Professor 

Robert S. Feldman, Associate professor of Psychology from Assistant Professor 

Tsuan H. Feng, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering from Instructor 

Thomas A. Grow, Assistant professor of Civil Engineering from Instructor 

Sidney Kaplan, Assistant Professor of English from Instructor 

Sidney ¥. Kauffman, Professor of Physical Education from Associate Professor 

Milo Kimball, Dean of School of Business Administration from Professor 

James B. Ludtke, Assistant Professor of Business Administration from Instructor 

Joseph S. Marcus, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering from Instructor 

Robert J. Morrissey, Associate Placement Officer from Assistant Professor 

William B. Nutting, Assistant Professor of Zoology from Instructor jp , 

Robert K. Patterson, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering from Instructor | J 

Harold Ranch, Assistant Professor of Zoology from Instructor 

Benjamin Ricci, Jr., Assistant professor of Physical Education from Instructor 



Promotions - 2 

Frank A. Singer, Assistant Professor of Accounting from Instructor 
Russell E. Smith, Professor of Veterinary Science from Associate Professor 
James G. Snedecor, Associate Professor of Physiology from Assistant Professor 
Daniel Sobala, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering from Instructor 
H. Lels-nd Varley, Associate Professor of English from Assistant Professor 
Anthony W, Zaitz, Assistant Professor of Speech from Instructor 

Experiment Station 

# 

John S. Bailey, Associate Professor, Research, Cranberry Station from Assistant 

Professor of Pomology 
Philip L, Rusden, Assistant professor, Shade Tree Laboratories from Instructor 

Extension Service 

Constantino J. Gilgut, Extension Plant Pathologist from Assistant Professor, 
Research, liursery Culture 

RESIGNATIONS 

Instruction 

Burton R. Anderson, Instructor in Botany, August 31, 1952 

Gordon D. Arnold, Assistant physician, August 31, 1952 

John Ashton, Instructor in History, August 31, 1952 

David W. Bishop, professor of Physiology, August 31, 1952 (after year ? e leave of absence) 

Marie Boas, Assistant Professor of History, August 31, 1952 

jess G. Games, Instructor in History, August 31, 1952 

Frederick M. Chakour, Instructor in Chemical Engineering, August 31, 1952 

Shurman Y. Chang, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, August 31, 1952 

James P. Coffey, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, August 31, 1952 

Geoffrey St, John Cornish, Instructor in Agrostology, August 31, 1952 

William A. Cowan, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, June 23, 1952 (after 

year 1 8 leave of absence) 
Thomas W. Eck, Professor of Physical Education, August 31, 1952 
Barbara B. Hanson, Instructor in Home Economics, August 31, 1952 
William C* Hartnett, Jr., Instructor in Zoology, July 31, 1952 
Joseph F. Hill, Jr., Instructor in German, August 31? 1952 

Marilyn L. Hirschhaut, Instructor in Physical Education for Women, August 31, 1952 
Francis E. Hummel, Instructor in Business Administration, August 31, 1952 
Beymour Katsh, Instructor in Physiology, August 31, 1952 
Joseph A. Masi, Instructor in Physical Education, August 31, 1952 
John II. Mitchell, Instructor in English, August 31, 1952 
William H. Morgan, Instructor in German, August 31, 1952 
Edward A. Nebesky, Instructor in Food Technology, April 5 f 1952 

Paul D. Ritger, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1952 (after year's Leave of absence) 
Elmer S. Sachse, Instructor in Engineering, August 31, 1952 " ■ 

Walter J. Stelkovis, Instructor in Speech, August 31, 1952 

Frederick R. Tibbetts, Instructor in German, August 31, 1952 (after year»s Leave of absence) 

Edwin R. Walker, Instructor in Government, August 31, 1952 

Norman E. Wilson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, August 31, Wi* 



•E , • 

1952 
r, Researc -ember 30, 1952 

search, altural optember 12, 1952 

itnicbor 5 Ret ., Veterin; ice, December 31, i952 

L Spear, Instructor,, Research., Poultry ase, May 31, 1952 

vension Saarc" 

t Erfcension Special! ugust 31, 1952 
: iilli: .ider of Home Beaaonsi" "its, February 29> 1952 



DEATH 
ant professor of Food Management, September \2 S 1952 

RETIREMENTS 

Head, Cranberry Station, August 31 9 19;" 
distant professor, ^asesreh^ February 29, -1952 
■feasor,. semeni, August 31, 1952 
isenmsnger, .'■'• .-ofessoi .gronon^y, August 31 9 1952 






I 



1 



OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS' 

February 23, 1953, 10:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst, Mass, 



Chairman Whitaore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Taber, Presi- 
dent Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke, George Brehm, Superin- 
tendent of Buildings and Grounds 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The Committee considered names for the new dining hall 

and heard the unanimous recommendation from the campus committee 

on building names that the dining hall be called University 

Commons. After discussion, and on the recommendation of President 

Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees name the new 
dining hall University Commons. 

The Committee next considered names for the two women 1 s 

dormitories now under construction. On the recommendation of the 

campus committee on names, and of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trastees name the 
northern most of the two new dormitories 
for women, Leach House, and the southern 
most, Crabtree House, in honor of Lottie 
A. Leach, former Trustee of the University, 
and Lotta Crabtree, benefactor of the Uni- 
versity. 

Chairman VMtmore asked whether the University places in- 
scriptions inside its buildings so that students and visitors will 
know the reason for the name on the outside. The President said 
some buildings are so marked and others are not. After discussion, 
it was 



rt 



University 
Commons 



Dormitories - 
Leach House 

and 
Crabtree House 



Names in 
Buildings 



1770 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Dormitories 



Women' s 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request that 
suitable inscriptions be placed on plaques 
inside each building named for a person. 
These inscriptions would briefly state the 
full name of the person for whom the build- 
ing was named with a line such as - Presi- 
dent of the University, 1920-30, or Trustee, 
1913-26, etc. 

Treasurer Johnson then presented the attached progress 

report on buildings and it was 

VOTED : To request that this report be made a part 
of the minutes. 

Members of the Committee discussed with University 
officials the problem of planning two additional dormitories and 
it was felt that one should be for women and one for men. Question 
was raised as to how to locate the dormitory for men in view of 
the lack of steam pressure in the men's dormitory area. Mr. Brehm 
said that one more dormitory could be serviced by completing a 
loop in the steam system and this could be done with funds now 
available, at some sacrifice to other desired projects. It was 
agreed that the most desirable proposal would be for the comple- 
tion of adequate steam lines through appropriation requested in 
the current budget. However, if this item should not pass it 
would be possible to make a temporary connection adequate for one 
more men's dormitory with present funds. 

The Committee visited the proposed site for the Women's 

Physical Education Building and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize lo- 
cation of the Women's Physical Education 
Building north of Eastman Lane and approxi- 
mately as far east from North Pleasant Street 
as the location of the new dining hall. The 
Women' s Physical Education Building would then 
stand in the same relation to the women's 
dormitories on the north as the boarding hall 
occuoias in relation to the dormitories on the 



LI. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Committee, in company with Louis V. Boss, architect, 

inspected the women's dormitory area and 

'" 'TED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
location of the next women's dormitory 
along $orth Plea.sant Street between Hamlin 
and Knowlton Houses, this dormitory to 
accommodate approximately 200 students and 
to be connected with Knowlton and Hamlin 
with breezeways or open porches. 

The Committee inspected progress of construction of the 
new dining hall and raised inquiry as to when the sheds and green- 
house adjoining East Experiment Station would be torn down. The 
Committee pointed out that it had recommended more than a year ago 
that these structures be demolished as detracting from the beauty 
of a rapidly developing section of the campus. It was 

VOTES : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Administration to remove all wooden 
sheds and the greenhouse attached to the 
East Experiment Station building. 

The Committee spent considerable time in the vicinity of 

the men' s dormitories seeking a suitable location :" : the next 

building to be constructed, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Truste ' ^e 

construction of the next iormitory foi men east 
of and in line with Chadbourne House, and that 
the architect be requested to p3 -is 
structure as a half dormitory to be completed 
later with another half east of Greene ugh House 
and adjoining the north side of the first half. 

The Committee discussed the devel : at of the whole 

area to the east of Chadbourne . ~ C-reer and t ■ north :_ 

Butt erf i eld and 

VOTEI ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize use 
of this area for men's dormitories. 



1771 



Women ' s 

Dormitories 



Removal of Sheds 
and Greenhouse, 
East Experiment 
Station 



Men's 
Dormitories 



1772 



COMMITTEE 



Munson Hall 



Durfee Plant 
House 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Committee gave tentative approval to a sketch plan 
providing for the development of service roads and parking in 
this area. 

The Committee next visited Munson Hall and after inspec- 
tion of the alterations to this building 

VOTED ; Unanimously to recommend that the Trustees 
accept the alterations as completed 
December 19, 1952. 

The Committee inspected photographs submitted by Lord 

and Burnham in connection with the proposed construction of Durfee 

Range. Lord and Burnham have stated that it will not be possible 

to have a curved roof over the entrance to the building, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept a 
flat roof over the entrance to the new 
Durfee Range. Curvilinear construction 
will be maintained in the rest of the 
building. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4-1-40 P.M. 




J7&'"'* 




/• 



Secretary 



March 4, 1953 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Report on the Progress of Projects in the 
Capital Outlay Program 



Project Appropriation 

1, Dining Commons &L, 025,000 

Architect: Maloney & Tessier 
Contractor: Bathelt Construction Company 

Construction is proceeding a little 
behind schedule but we are assured that 
it will be completed for use in September, 
1953. 

2, New Durfee Range 70,000 

Architect: George C. Brehm 

Lord and Burnham Corporation is 
furnishing plans for this building* It 
is scheduled to go out to bid this spring. 

3, Laboratory and Improvements - French and Wilder 33*000 

Halls 

Architect : George C ♦ Brehm 

The plans for the additional laboratory 
at French Hall are completed and are being 
submitted to the Public Building Commission 
for approval. The improvement of the 
lighting in Wilder Hall is being developed* 

4« Reconstruction of Old Paige Laboratory 46,000 

now Hun son Hall 

Architect: George C. Brehm 
■Contractor: Morrill Construction Company 

This project is completed in the main 
building. The second portion of the project 
involves renovation of the annex to make a 
printing shop and storage space for the 
Extension Service. Plans for this part of the 
project are being held up until the building 

is vacated* This should be done in about 

two months • 



f 



t 



Report on the Progress of Projects in 

the Capital Outlay Program -2- 



Project Appropriation 

5. Improvements to Utilities 279,000 

Engineer: Merrill Associates 
Contractors: Steam - Hartwell Company 

Electric - Collins Electric Co., 

Two contracts — one for steam and 
one for electric — are in the process 
of construction at the present time. 
These will provide steam and power to the 
dining commons and steam to the new 
dormitories ff-10 and $11. It is also 
correcting other urgently needed conditions 
such as steam to Fisher Laboratory to 
replace oil heaters and electric system 
in the vicinity of Clark Hall. In addition, 
Merrill Associates are designing more steam 
and electric additions and an increase in 
the size of the main sewer is planned* 

6. Improvements to Bowker Auditorium 236,000 

Architect: McClintock & Craig 

This project is in the stage of 
negotiating with the architects for suit- 
able compensation for their services • 

7* Public Health Center - State - 1,031,000 

Federal - 250,000 

1,231,000 

Architects: M. A. Dyer Company 

Bid plans and specifications are 
nearly completed. This project should 
go out to bid this spring* 

3. Comnletion of Engineering Building #50,000 

Architect: Appleton and Stearns 

m The plans are nearly completed, 
A his project should go out to bid within 
60 dayso 



Report on the rrogress of Projects in 

the Capital Outlay Program - 3t 



ft 



Project 

9, Farm and Dairy Buildings Improvements 

Architects: Dairy - Louis V, Ross 

Farm * Profs, Hendrickson 

and Stapleton 

Plans are being prepared by Mr. Ross 
for improvements of the Dairy laboratories 
and areas in Flint Lab. A new beef barn 
is being designed by Profs. Hendrickson 
and Stapleton* 

10 • Improvements to Farm 

Architects: Profs. Hendrikson & Stapleton 

Plans for additions and improvements 
to farm buildings are nearing completion* 

11. Physical Education Improvements 

Architect: George C« Brehm 

A nev; fence on the east side of the 
athletic field has been constructed by the 
Hampden Fence Co, Advertisements for bids 
for a new running track for the Cage are now 
out with bids being opened on March 27, 1953* 
Plans are well along for additional tennis 
courts which will be built this summer. 

12, Surfacing of Clark Hill and Other Roads 

Engineers: Oeoartment of Public Works 
Contractor: Uarner Brothers, Inc* 

This project' is well along and will be 
- completed this spring. 



Appropriation 



75,000 



70,000 



75,000 



90,000 



In addition to these projects^ the two women's 
dormitories being built by the Building Association are 
progressing with what appears to be satisfactory .progress 
The roofs are now going on and interior partitions being 
started. 

Architect: Louis VJ. Ross 
Contractor: D. A. Sullivan & Sons 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Amherst, Mass. 



April 23, 1953 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated April 22, 1953 from Secretary 
Burke to the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot are hereby 
made part of the official records of the Board, 



April 22, 1953 



Finance Committee 
Board of Trustees 



Enclosed is letter from Treasurer Johnson concerning 
our holdings of certain Government bonds. Mr. Haigis, Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, has approved this proposal and 
authorized a mail ballot to save the need of a special meeting 
of the Committee. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James W. Burke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



MAIL BALLOT 

I vote to X authorize the Treasurer, effective May 1, 

not to 

1953 y to exchange the following bonds, par for par: 



$1000 Series G due July 1, 1953 
$2000 Series G due October 1, 1953 



for 3j$ Treasury bonds due June 15, 1983. 

Signed: Joseph ¥. ^artlett 
William M. G as hin 
R. A. Van ^eter 



A. C. Brett 
John Haigis 
Philip F. Vhitmore 




cretary 






1774 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



April 22, 1953 



Mr. John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Finance Committee, Board of Trustees 
University of Ma ssachu setts 

Dear Sir: 

Holders of United States Savings Bonds, Series F and 
G maturing from May through December, 1953> have been offered 
the privilege of exchanging their bonds, par for par, with in- 
terest adjustments to May 1st for the new 3±% Treasury Bonds 
due June 15, 19^3 • Presentation for the exchange must be 
made before iV *ay 1st. The Trustees hold the following bonds: 

$1,000 Series G due July 1, 1953 
$2,000 Series G due October 1, 1953 

It is the recommendation of our Agent, The Trust 
Department of the First National Bank of Amherst, that these 
Series G Bonds be exchanged for the new 3j Treasury Bonds due 
in 1933. (The Series G Bonds pay 2\%.) 

Since this exchange must be made by May 1, 1953> 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee has authorized the en- 
closed mail ballot. 

Very truly yours, 



/s/ Kenneth W. Johnson 
Treasurer 



KWJ.-GHP 
E nc. 

cc. Mr. Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 
F. Roland ^cDermott 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Dr. Joseph W. Bartlett 
President Van Meter 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 15, 1953, 10:00 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden presiding 



Trustees Boyden, Desmond, Donohue, 
Perry, Bartlett, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



177, 



VOTED : To waive reading of call and minutes of 
the last meeting. 

Because of President Van Meter' s illness, Chairman 
Boyden invited Dean Rand to review briefly the progress which the 
committee of school deans has made in its search for a Dean of 
the College of Arts and Science. 

Dean Rand said that the committee had agreed unanimously 
on Dr. Gordon Castle, Dean of the Graduate School at the Univer- 
sity of Montana, and that it had been the President 1 s intention to 
present this name to the Trustees. However, just prior to the 
meeting, Dean Castle had withdrawn upon learning of the President'^ 
illness. Therefore, the committee is not prepared to make a 
recommendation at this time. 

Dr. Boyden thanked Dean Rand and the committee for their 
efforts in attempting to fill this position. 

Secretary Burke reported that President Van Meter and 
Leon Bradley, Head of the University' s Department of Bacteriology 
and Public Health, have been working for more than a year toward 
establishing a Division of Nursing and locating a candidate to 
head this new division. The President was aided in his 



Dean of College 
of Arts and 
Science 



Division of 
Nursing 



1776 



COMMITTEE 



Mary Maher, 
Professor of 
Nursing 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 
V. A. Rice 



Sabbatical 

Leave for 

R. P. Holdsworth 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 
Barbara Higgins 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

deliberations by a committee of women in charge of nursing programs 

in various educational agencies and in hospitals. Upon the 

recommendation of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
establishment of a Division of Nursing in 
the University subject to approval of the proper 
accrediting authorities. 



Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 



unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Miss Mary Maher to head the Division of 
Nursing in the grade of full professor 
at annual salary of $6,130 effective 
September 1, 1953. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees change 
the date of sabbatical leave approved 
for Professor V. A. Rice from the first 
semester of the college year 1953-54- to 
the second semester of the college year 

1953-54. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees change 

the date of sabbatical leave previously 
approved for Robert P. Holdsworth from 
February 1 through August 31? 1953 to 
February 1 through August 31 > 1954. 

On the recommendation of Dean Sieling of the College of 

Agriculture and Horticulture and of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

sabbatical leave for Miss Barbara Higgins, 
Home Demonstration Agent at Large, Exten- 
sion Service, U of M, for six months with 
full pay beginning September 15, 1953 for 
the purpose of study toward a Master's de- 
gree. 



EH 



rtMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the simultaneous award of the A.B. de- 
gree and an Engineering degree to Donald 
Cordette provided that Mr. Cordette 
satisfactorily completes all requirements 
for each degree during a period of study 
of not less than five academic years. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 A.M. 




cretary 



Two Degrees 



Donald 

Cordette 
v 



1778 



COMMITTEE 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 17, 1953, 10:30 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Boyden, Donohue, McNamara, 
Provost Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Provost Mather explained that the Course of Study 

Committee of the University and the Educational Policies Council 

have recommended certain changes in the curriculum and these have 

his complete approval. The changes were recommended after careful 

study by the various departments and schools concerned. No major 

changes are involved. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following changes in the curriculum: 

1. Reorganization of junior- senior offerings in German 
Literature - recommended by unanimous vote of the 
College of Arts on March 19, 1953. 

2. To add Physics 27.(1)28.(11) — General Physics as 
described below with the added qualification and 
the Committee recognizes this special course as 
available to all students including Physics majors 
who meet the necessary Mathematics preparation 
described in the catalogue listing. 

27 (I) 28 (II). GENERAL PHYSICS — This course is 
for students whose mathematical background includes 
a working knowledge of differential calculus and who 
have had or are currently enrolled in a course in 
integral calculus. The topics covered are essentially 
those of Physics 25, 26, with special emphasis on the 
mathematical development of the following topics: 
Statics, centroids, Gauss' theorem, dielectrics and 
A.C. electricity. 

3 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 1+. 

Prerequisite, Math. 5, 6 or equivalent. 

Currently taking Math. 31. 



1779 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. That the recommendation of the Department of Economics 
for a change in title of the Economics 26 course now 
called Distribution to Economics 26 — Problems of 
the National Economy, be approved. 

4.. The inclusion of a Fisheries Technology option for 
Food Technology majors, with a suggested curriculum 
as outlined by a special curriculum committee appointed 
by President Van Meter. The suggested curriculum was 
approved with the following comments of reservation re- 
lating to future planning: (a) Chemistry 34- - 
Biochemistry listed for the second semester of the 
third year cannot be offered until instruction at the 
level of Assistant Professor can be secured and an 
agreement reached among the Departments to shift 
Chemistry 79 to the second semester; (b) Catalogue 
course descriptions must be developed for Food 
Technology 73, and Food Technology 74-? listed as new 
courses in the first and second semesters respectively 
of the fourth years; (c) On query to Dr. Fellers who 
visited the meeting to answer questions, it was also 
suggested that Oceanography proposed for the second 
semester of the fourth year be offered in some other 
Department of the University; (d) It was pointed out 
in passing that the program allows 6 hours of elective - 
4. in the second semester of the senior year and 2 in 
the second semester of the junior year. 



5. The option and suggested curriculum of a major in 
Food Management in the Food Technology Option were 
approved recognizing that catalogue course descriptions 
will have to be developed at an appropriate time in the 
future to cover new courses tentatively indicated as 
Food Management 67, and Food Management 68 to be 
offered in the junior year of the proposed option. 

6. Recommendations for changes in course catalogue copy 
as suggested by the Department of Geology and approved 
by the School of Science were approved. These 
suggestions read as follows: 

"Both Geology 6l and Geology 62 are currently taught 
as Geomorphology. In both of these a certain amount 
of glacial geology is covered as well as other materials. 
It is proposed that the glacial geology be concentrated 
into the second semester and taught as Geology 62 
Pleistocene Geology. Geology 61 will remain Geomorphology 
and also include subject matter now taught in Geology 62. 
With this arrangement of subjects, we feel that we can 
better serve our majors and be of service to other de- 
partments interested in specific terranal aspects. 



1780 



COMMITTEE 



3, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

61 GE0M0RPH0L0GY. (1954-55) - A review of recent 
studies concerning rock structures, weathering, 
streams, underground water, shorelines, wind work, 
volcanoes, and mountains. Field trips by arrange- 
ment. Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours ; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 3 

Mr. Wilson 

62 PLEISTOCENE GEOLOGY. (1954-55) - A study of 
Pleistocene world geology consisting of geological 
processes, land forms, existing and extinct glaciers, 
biota and stratigraphy. Field trips by arrangement. 
Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 3 

Mr. Wilson 

52. (II) PETROLOGY should be changed to LITH0L0GY. 
This course is misnamed in light of common usage. 
The name dates from Dr. Gordon's days before the 
name "Lithology" was in vogue. No change will be 
made in the course description or content of the 
course. " 

After brief discussion of a recommendation of endorse- 
ment from the College of Arts covering a major within 
a Department to be called "English - Journalism" it 
was recommended that the entire matter of curriculum 
policy relative to Journalism majors be referred to a 
special committee. The Chairman suggested that before 
such a committee is established he would consider the 
entire problem with Dean Rand of the College of Arts. 

It was voted to approve the recommendation of the 
Romance Language Department that Italian be made avail- 
able to underclassmen and redesignated in terms of 
numbering as follows: Italian 51 > 52, should be 
changed to Italian 1 and 2. Italian 75 and 76 should 
be changed to Italian 25 and 26. (The numbers on the 
sophomore courses were changed from 21 and 22 as 
listed in the original memorandum from the Italian De- 
partment, to 25 and 26 in order to keep these in the 
normal sophomore numbering sequence.) Additional 
reservations or suggestions for this change were: 
(a) That School Deans should be notified that it would 
be advisable to restrict people to languages preferred 
in their Schools in case Italian does not meet their 

requirements; (b) That this change in course numbers 
still involves the general requirement that no credit 
can be given in a language course for the first 
semester until the second semester is completed. 



17. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED ; To adopt the following Chemical Engineering- 
curriculum: 

Freshman Year 



1st Semester 




Cr. 


2nd Semester 


Cr. 


English 1, Composition 


2 


English 2, Composition 


2 


Speech 3 




1 


Speech 4- 


1 


Math. 5, Analytical 


Geometry 4- 


Math. 6, Differential 










Calculus 


U 


Chem. 1, General 




3 


Chem. 2 or ^, General 


u 


Mechanical Engineering 1, 




•Mechanical Engineering 2 




Drawing 




2 


Drawing 


3 


Military 1 




3 


Military 2 


2 


Physical Ed. 3 




1 


Physical Ed. 4- 


1 




Elect 


one of 


the following: 




History 5 




3 


History 6 


3 


German 1, 5 




3 


German 2, 6 


3 


French 1, 5, 15 




3 


French 2, 6, 16 


3 


Spanish 1, 7 




19 


Spanish 2, 8 


20 



Note: 1 - French or German is recommended for Chemical Engineers. 

Sophomore Year 



Chem. 29, Qualitative Anal. 4 
Physics 27, Mech. Sound Heat 4 
Math 31 ? Integ. Calcs 4 
English 25, Survey of Lit. 3 
Military 25 2 

Physical Ed. 33 1 



18 



Chem. 30 f Quantitative Anal. 4 
Physics 23, Light, Elect. 4 
Math 32, Diff. Equations 4- 
Chem. Eng. 26, Calcs. 2 
English 26, Survey of Lit. 3 
Military 26 2 

Physical Ed. 34- 1 

20 



Chem. 51, Organic 
Chem. 65, Physical 
Civil Eng. 34, Statics 



Junior Year 



4 
4- 
3 



Ch.E. 55, Calcs. and Unit 

Oper. I 
Econ. 25, General 2 

19 



Chem. 52, Organic 

Chem. 66, Physical 

Civil Eng. 51, Strength of 

Matls. 
Ch.E. 56, Unit Oper. II 
Psychology 26 or Sociology 

28 2 



Summer Following -Junior Year (6 wks.) 
Chem. Engr. 75, Instrumen- Chem. Engr. 88, Unit Oper. 

tation 2 Lab. 



U 
4- 

3 
5 



19 



1782 



COMMITTEE 



Robert B. 
Livingston 



Sabbatical 
Leave Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1st Semester 
Ch.E. 31, Heat-Energy Rel. 
Ch.E. 93 , Comprehensive 

Prob. I 
Ch.E. 91, Seminar I 
E.E. 63, Elements of Elec. 

Engr. 
Ch.E. 89, Lab. Projects 
Electives-^ 



Senior Year 
Cr. 



3 
1 

3 
3 

Jl 
19 



2nd Semester Cr, 
Ch.E. 82, Ind. Equilibria 

and Mine tics 3 
Ch.E. 94-, Comprehensive Prob. 

II 3 
Ch.E. 92, Seminar II 1 
E.E. 65, Industrial Applica- 
tions 3 

8 



Electives-* 



13 



Notes: 2 - Advanced military students will take Economics, 
Psychology, or Sociology as two of their senior 
electives. 
3 - Recommended electives include History, Government, 
French, German, Math. 33, English 83, Ch.E. 57, 53, 
95, 93, Chem. 77, 79, 36, 93, 3U, M.E. 39, 4-6, Bus. 
Law 70. Other courses may be chosen with the 
approval of the Head of the Department. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED: To recommend the promotion of Dr. Robert B. 

Livingston from Associate Professor of Botany 
to Professor of Botany at annual salary of 
$6180 effective September 1, 1953. 

Provost Mather said that President Van Meter had 
appointed a committee of three, including the Provost, to review 
the University' s sabbatical leave policy and to recommend policy 
relative to acceptance of teaching assignments by staff members 
while on leave from the University. The Trustees read the 
recommendations of Provost Mather's committee and after delibera- 
tion and discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees amend the 
sabbatical leave policy of the University 
to read as follows: 

1. A leave of absence with pay is not an earned perquisite; 
rather it is a period of freedom from academic duties 
granted by the Trustees to enable the recipient to de- 
vote the time to study, research, writing, travel or 
other equally meritorious pursuit to the end that through 
personal advancement he may serve the University more 

effectively. 



1783 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2. The opportunity for sabbatical leave shall apply to 
all staff members ranking as assistant professor or 
above, who have been in continuous service of the 
University for at least six years, and who upon returning 
from sabbatic would have six years to serve as a staff 
member before compulsory retirement. Sabbatical leaves 
shall be granted not more frequently than once in 

seven years. 

3. The staff member will be limited to one-half year with 
full salary or a full year at one-half salary. For 
teaching staff, leaves shall coincide with regularly 
scheduled University semesters. 

U* No leave with pay shall be granted for salaried employ- 
ment, in this country or elsewhere, however desirable 
the experience. This does not preclude acceptance of 
scholarships, fellowship, or grants for which no services 
are required and where the financial aid is for the pur- 
pose of research or study. 

5. Any member of the staff wishing to avail himself of 
sabbatical leave should file his statement of intention 
with the head of his department at least six months be- 
fore the leave is to take effect. If approved by him 
and the Dean of his School, it is then presented to 
the President for his approval and action by the Board 
of Trustees. A member of the Extension or Experiment 
Station staff should file his request with the head of 
his department, who, if he approves, will present it 
through the Director of his Division to the President 
who will then place it before the Trustees with his 
recommendation. Members of the Administrative Group 
make their applications directly to the President. 

6. In order that the leave may be of benefit to the Uni- 
versity as well as to the individual's personal ad- 
vancement, the recipient of such a grant must return 
to duty for at least one full year of service 
immediately after the expiration of his leave. 
Failure to comply, obligates the recipient to return 
the leave-allowance money. In the matter of extenuating 
circumstances, this repayment may be modified or can- 
celled by the Board of Trustees. 



The committee also 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees adopt the 

following policy relative to leave without 
pay: 



1784 



COMMITTEE 



Leave Without 
Pay 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Purpose of Leave . On recommendation of the 
Department Head and the Dean of a School or 
College, a member of the faculty is eligible 
for leave -without pay, other than military 
leave, only at the discretion of the Presi- 
dent, for the following purposes: 

a. A personal reason which involves travel, 
study, or research, and results in promoting 
the interests of the University as well as 
the employee. 

b. Sickness or maternity. 

c. Any other reason determined to be of mutual 
benefit to the University and to the indi- 
vidual concerned. 

Length of Leave 

a. A leave is granted for a specific period of time. 

b. A leave of absence without salary normally does 
not exceed twelve consecutive calendar months. 

In no case may it exceed a maximum of twenty-four 
consecutive calendar months. 

c. For teaching staff, leave, except for reasons of 
health, shall coincide with regularly scheduled 
University semesters. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11 o f clock. 




£7 



Secretary 



I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

July 7, 1953, 12:30 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass, 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, McBenaott, 
Taber, Whitmore, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It vas 



VOTED : To dispense vith reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the 1954- capital outlay appro 
priation for the University included $275,000 for renovation of 
Draper Hall; $ 75, 000 for preparation of plans for an addition to 
Chemistry Building; $120,000 for Improvements to Utilities; and 
$50,000 for Plans for the Women's Physical Education Building. 
Under the new lav establishing the State Division of Building Con- 
struction, it is necessary for the Trustees to submit names of 
proposed architects or engineers within 21 days of the time of the 
appropriation for capital outlay. After study and discussion, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees nominate 
architects and engineers as follows: 

1. For Draper Hall Renovation - Alderman & MacNeish 

of Holyoke. 

2. Plans for Physical Education Building for Women - 

Perry, Shaw, ^epburn, Kehoe and Dean of Boston, 

3. Addition to Chemistry Building - Appleton and 

Stearns of Boston. 
U» Improvements to Utilities - Merrill Associates of 
Boston. 



1785 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



1786 



COMMITTEE 



Power 
Plant 



University 

Commons 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS „ 

Mr. Johnson said that the University Power Plc.nt, com- 
pleted in 1950, is now operating at capacity; that by some over- 
loading it can serve the buildings provided in the 1954 capital 
outlay appropriation, but that additions must be made soon. He 
said he has discussed this matter with Mr. Hall Nichols of the 
State Division of Building Construction and Mr. Nichols has agreed 
to finance a study of the need for expansion of the Power Plant 
and campus utilities in general. After discussion, it was 

VO TED ; To recommend that the Trustees request the 
State Division of Building Construction to 
make an engineering study of the Power 
Plant and utilities of the University and 
nominate Merrill Associates of Boston as 
the engineering firm to undertake such study. 

The committee studied architectural plans and specifica- 
tions for several new buildings and after discussion, 

VOTED; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
plans and specifications for the following 
buildings; 

1. Western Massachusetts Health Center - M. A. Dyer Co. 

2. Completion of the Engineering Building - Appleton 

and Stearns. 

3. Preliminary plans for Draper Hall - Alderman and 

MacNeish. 

4. Preliminary plans for addition to Chemistry Build- 

ing - Appleton and Stearns. 

5. Durfee Range - George C. Brehm. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Bathelt Construction 
Company, which has had the contract for the Dining Commons, has 
completed more than 90$ of its work. Various sub-contractors are 
now bringing the building to completion. Meantime, the University 
has been withholding 10$ of the total payment to Bathelt Con- 
struction Company as insurance on completion of the work. He felt 

that in view of the good record made by the Bathelt Company and 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



of their need for finances, the Trustees could safely reduce the 



retained percentage from 10 to 



After discussion, it was 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees reduce the 
retained percentage on the Dining Commons 
contract with Bathelt Construction Company 
from 10 to %. 

Chairman Whitrnore said that when the Legislature passed 

an appropriation of $5,000 for the Trustees to purchase the land 

owned by Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, it was stipulated that there 

be an appraisal of the land prior to purchase. It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees request the 

Treasurer to obtain an appraisal of the Alpha 
Sigma Phi lot at a cost not to exceed $100. 

The Treasurer said that a portion of Old Town Road from 
Farview Way to Brooks Farm which has been considered and used as 
a public way for many years is owned by the University rather than 
the town of Amherst. The town has stated that because of Univer- 
sity ownership, it cannot maintain this portion of the road. It 
was 

VOTED : To request Treasurer Johnson to investigate 
this matter further and to prepare a 
recommendation for the Executive Committee. 

Chairman Vhitmore stated that the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds was empowered by the Board of Trustees on June 17 to 
prepare a five-year capital outlay program for the University 
which must be submitted to the State House by July 10. He re- 
quested that the committee give careful study to this matter, and 
the remainder of the afternoon was devoted to the preparation of 
this program. Upon completion of the study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt the following five-year capital 
outlay program for the University: 



7 



Alpha Sigma 
Phi Fraternity 



Old Town 
Road 



1788 



COMMITTEE 



Five-year 
Capital 
Outlay Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1255. 

1. Women 1 s Physical Education Building 

2. Addition to Chemistry Building 

3. Plans for Classroom Building - Arts and 

Science 

4. Plans for Student Union Building 

5. Plans for Addition to Library 

6. Improvements to Utilities 

7. Garage and Service Building for Plant 

8. School and Fisheries Building * 



* If the Legislature establishes a School of 
Fisheries, a building for this purpose would 
cost 1300,000. 



$1,500,000 
1,725,000 

100,000 
75,000 
100,000 
365,000 
500,000 
300.000 



$4, 66 5, 000 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4- 
5. 



1956 

Classroom Building for Arts and Science $1,900,000 
Addition to Power Plant 1,000,000 

Addition to Library 1,900,000 

Student Union Building 1,500,000 

Vegetable Gardening Building and Greenhou ses 225.000 

$6,525,000 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



1252 

Addition to Food Technology Building 

Natural Resources Building 

Addition and Improvements to Marshall Hall 

Addition to Clark Hall - Botany 

Animal Industries Building 

Plans for Infirmary 



$ 475,000 

1,000,000 

900,000 

800,000 

800,000 

60.000 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



1^8 

Infirmary 

Agricultural Engineering Building 

Plant Science Unit (2 buildings) 

Fine Arts Building 

Animal Industries Research Barn 

Conservation Storage Building 



!25£ 

Classroom Building 

Administration Building 

Land Purchase 

Gymnasium - Physical Education for Men 

Service Building and Garage for Farm 



$4,035,000 



$1,000,000 

350,000 

1,500,000 

1,000,000 

100,000 

225.000 

$4,175,000 



$1,000,000 

950,000 

150,000 

1,500,000 

300.000 
$3,900,000 



1789 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:4-0 P.M. 



MMITTEE 




Secretary 



1790 



COMMITTEE 



Salary- 
Levels 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE OK REORGANIZATION PLAN 
July 16, 1953, 11:00 A.M., Dr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston, Mass, 

Chairman Bartlett presid' 



PRESENT: 



ling 

Trustees Bartlett, Cashin, Crowley, 
Brett, Boyden, Vhitmore, Provost 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call. 

Provost Mather discussed the proposed reorganization plan 
of the School of Agriculture. He pointed out that Agriculture is 
still the most important field in which the University is engaged; 
that approximately half of the annual maintenance budget of the 
University is devoted to Agriculture, that 678 students are 
currently enrolled; that there are 66 teachers of Agriculture, 43 
extension teachers of Agriculture, 63 research workers in Agri- 
culture, and 19 members on the professional staff under the heading 
Control Laws. This makes a total professional staff of 191 in 
Agriculture. 

At the present time each employee is assigned to a 
particular compartment. The state would benefit greatly if the 
skills of an extension teacher, for example, could be used for cam- 
pus instruction, for research, or control. The School of Agri- 
culture would have greater flexibility in offering its services to 
the students and to the public and could offer both a greater 
variety of instruction and greater specialization. 

To break down the present compartment, it is necessary 
(l) to place agricultural teachers on a 12 months' contract so that 
their services can be used the year-round in any or all divisions 



1 



OMMITTEE 



1791 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of Agriculture. To change these men from 9 to 12 months, it 
would be necessary to increase their compensation. (2) To restore 
a salary differential which existed until 19-47 for professional 
staff members in Agriculture who serve 12 months as against those 
who serve 9 months. 

Forty-one of the present 66 agricultural teachers are 
able and willing to change to the new basis of employment; namely, 
from 32 to U& weeks per year {50% work increase) at a salary in- 
crease of 15%» 

Provost Mather pointed out that all other land-grant 
colleges in the United States do have this plan and pay an average 
differential of 18 to 20$ for 12 months' employees above 9 months' 
employees. 

The committee then heard testimony from Professor 
Stapleton, Head of the Department "of Agricultural Engineering, 
Professor Vestcott of Agricultural Economics, Professor Jeffrey, 
Head of the Poultry Department and Professor Fellers, Head of the 
Food Technology Department. These men discussed in detail how the 
plan would affect their own departments and how the flexibility 
and quality of their work could be increased by employing pro- 
fessional staff members in any of the divisions of Agriculture 
rather than confining each man to one division as at present. 

Provost Mather said that of the 41 teachers who would 
move from 32 to 4.8 weeks, 11 were department heads in Agriculture 
who already serve about 4-8 weeks per year but are not compensated 
accordingly. The remaining 30 teachers who would move from 32 to 
48 weeks would mean an equivalent of adding only ten full time 



1792 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

positions for research and extension. This increased time would 
be divided over 11 departments in Agriculture (about one man's 
time per department) . He pointed out that there would, therefore, 
be no real problem of finding profitable employment for the men 
and that the University could hold down its budget askings for new 
employees in extension and experiment in the next few years if 
this program is adopted. 

The Provost pointed out also that research and much ex- 
tension teaching in Agriculture must be done in the summer months 
when the crops are growing and ripening. After discussion, the 
committee unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt a reorganization plan for Agri- 
culture at a cost of $139,500 as detailed 
below. 

The committee then considered salaries for administra- 
tive positions at the University. It was recalled that the 
Trustees have been unable to fill satisfactorily the position of 
Dean of the College of Arts and Science because of the inadequacy 
of the compensation. Chairman Bartlett recalled also that great 
difficulty had been encountered in filling the positions of 
Treasurer and of Provost and that it was largely a matter of good 
luck that the Trustees had been able to fill these positions 
satisfactorily with the salaries available. 

He said that the position of Dean of Arts and Science is 
a most important position and that the Trustees must obtain an 
adequate salary and still keep comparable deans and other admini- 
strative officers properly paid. The committee agreed that the 
position of Provost should carry a larger salary than that of the 



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I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

school deans because he is intended to be the vice-president of the 
University, and to act for the President in his absence, as he is 
now doing. The compensation of this position especially needs 
correction for the future good of the University. 

Upward adjustment of agricultural salaries would bring 
administrative salaries even more out of line than at present. 

Chairman Bartlett said the personnel of the University 
has been outstanding in accomplishments, in their interest in and 
faithfulness to their work and the reputation they have created 
in the collegiate world. These abilities should be compensated 
adequately . 

After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following salary schedule 
for school deans and University ad- 
ministrative officers. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 P.M. 



1793 




Secretary 



1794 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
July 16, 1953, 2:30 P.M., Dr. Bartlett* s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT! 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Crowley, Whitmore, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It "was 



Power 
Plant 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To nominate architects and engineers as 
follows : 

1. For Draper Hall Renovation - Alderman and 

MacNeish of Holyoke. 

2. Plans for Physical Education Building for 

Women - Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe and 
Dean of Boston. 

3. Addition to Chemistry Building - Appleton 

and Stearns of Boston. 
U* Improvements to Utilities - Merrill 
Associates of Boston. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the State Division of Building 
Construction to make an engineering study 
of the Power Plant and utilities of the Uni- 
versity and nominate Merrill Associates of 
Boston as the engineering firm to undertake 
such study. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the plans and specifications for 
the following buildings: 



1. 
. 2. 



Western Massachusetts Health Center - M. A. 

Dyer Co. 
Completion of the Engineering Building - 

Appleton and Stearns. 



(MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3. 
4-. 
5. 

It was 



Preliminary Plans for Draper Hall - Alderman 

and MacNeish. 
Preliminary plans for addition to Chemistry 

Building - Appleton and Stearns. 
Durfee Range - George C. Brehm. 



VOTED ; To reduce the retained percentage on the 
Dining Commons contract with Bathelt Con- 
struction Company from 10 to 5% plus an addi- 
tional amount sufficient to cover all liens 
against the general contractor. 

It was 

VOTED: To request the Treasurer to obtain an appraisal 
of the Alpha Sigma Phi lot at a cost not to ex- 
ceed $100 and to authorize the Treasurer to pro- 
ceed with the purchase of this lot if the 
appraisal equals or exceeds $5>000 and the lot 
may be purchased at a cost of #5*000. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the contract with the Hartwell Company, 
Providence, R. I. for steam line additions 
and improvements be accepted as completed in 
accordance with the terms of the contract on 
May 29, 1953. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the contract with the Collins Electric 
Company, Springfield, for additions and im- 
provements to electric lines be accepted as 
completed in accordance with the terms of the 
contract on July 1, 1953 • 

It was 

VOTED ; That the contract with Warner Brothers, Inc. 
Sunderland, for improvements to Clark Hill 
and other roads be accepted as completed in 
* accordance with the terms of the contract on 

June 30, 1953. 

Chairman Bartlett and Trustee Brett discussed the lease 
forms in connection with the construction of the next dormitory fo^ 
women to be built between Hamlin and Knowlton Houses along North 
Pleasant Street* To keep rentals at the present level, it will be 



University 
Commons 



Alpha Sigma 
Phi Fraternity 



Steam Line 
Additions and 
Improvements 



Electric Lines 
Additions and 
Improvements 



Road Improve- 
ment 



Dormitory for 
Women 



1796 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



necessary to amortize the bonds over a period of 30 years. The 
building is to be ready for occupancy in September of 1954* 

Treasurer Johnson said that in his opinion the lease 
rental will be of an amount so that the new dormitory can be 
financed without increasing student rentals. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED : That the form of lease from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to University of Massachusetts 
Building Association of a parcel of land for the 
erection of one student dormitory, all pursuant 
to Act s of 1939, Chapter 338, as amended or 
supplemented, by Acts of 194-5, Chapter 390, by 
Acts of 194.6, Chapter 352, by Acts of 194.8, 
Chapter I85, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414-, by 
Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, and by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, be and hereby is approved as pre- 
sented to this meeting; and that the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts, or a majority 
.thereof, be and hereby are authorized, in the 
name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in or substantially in the form presented to 
this meeting, said lease of land from the 
Commonwealth to the Association and to cause 
the common seal of the University of Massachu- 
setts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

ffQTED : That the form of lease of one student dormitory 
by University of Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts pursuant 
to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended or supple- 
mented by Acts of 194-5, Chapter 390, by Acts of 
1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 194-3, Chapter 185, 
by Acts of 1950, Chapter U4, by Acts of 1952, 
Chapter 211, and by Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, 
said building to be erected by said Association 
on a parcel of land to be leased to it by the 
Commonwealth, be and hereby is approved as pre- 
sented to this meeting; and that the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts, or a majority 
thereof, be and hereby are authorized, in the 
name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in or substantially in the form presented to this 
meeting, said lease of one dormitory from said 



>MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Association to the Commonwealth and to cause 
the common seal of the University of Massachu- 
setts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

VOTED : That the form of agreement for amendment of the 
Land Lease dated as of July 1, 194-3* and re- 
corded with Hampshire Deeds, Book 1033, Page 441 > 
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Association, be 
and hereby is approved as presented to this meet- 
ing, said amendment to be consented to by State 
Street Trust Company, of Boston, Massachusetts, 
as Trustee under Trust Indenture dated as of 
August 15, 194-3; and that the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, 
be and hereby are authorized, in the name and on 
behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
• stantially in the form presented to this meeting, 
said agreement and to cause the common seal of the 
University of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

VOTED : That the form of consent under the Building 

Lease dated as of July 1, 194$, from University 
of Massachusetts Building Association to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting, the giving 
of said consent to be consented to by State Street 
Trust Company of Boston, Massachusetts, as Trustee 
under Trust Indenture dated as of August 15, 194-3 J 
and that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof, be and hereby 
are authorized, in the name and on behalf of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to execute, acknowl- 
edge and deliver, in or substantially in the form 
presented to this meeting, said consent and to 
cause the common seal of the University of Massa- 
chusetts to be affixed thereto. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Chairman to name a delegate to 
the annual meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities and 
Allied Institutions. This meeting is to take 
place in -Florida in the fall of 1953. Chairman 
Bartlett named Trustee Whitmore as the official 
delegate. 



Meeting of Assoc, 
of Governing 
Boards of State 
Univ. & Allied 
Institutions 



1798 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 P.M. 




^ 



■■ ■ • 



_Secretary 



Q^o^ w<l<>AXfear 



Chairman 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION 
September 26, 1953, 12:30 P.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 

Chairman Cashin presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Cashin, Taber, Mrs. McNamara, 
Brown, Whitmore, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson 

Alumni - George Benoit, Mrs. Mary Doyle 
Curran, Wynton R« Danglemayer, Maxwell 
Goldberg, Charles M. Powell, Fred C. 
Ellert and Robert Leavitt, Executive 
Secretary of Associate Alumni 

The Chairman stated that this was the first meeting of 
the Trustee Committee on Legislation with the Education Council 
of the Associate Alumni for the purpose of exchanging ideas and 
obtaining cooperation in working towards the objectives of the 
University as formulated by the 3oard of Trustees. In the general 
discussion that followed, members of the Education Council of the 
Associate Alumni expressed themselves as being wholeheartedly in 
favor of working with the Trustees and the University administra- 
tion in promoting the welfare of the University. It was stated 
that the purpose of establishing the educational council was to 
work along these lines. 

Provost Mather presented a vivid picture of the critical 
situation that the University finds itself in this fail with its 
largest enrollment of over 4,000 students. He stated that the 
housing for these students was excellent due entirely to the 
efforts of the alumni -sponsored building corporation which has 
made it possible to construct dormitories as they have been 



1799 



Education 
Council 



1800 



COMMITTEE 



Student 

Union 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

needed. Contrasted with this is the situation on thy campus where 
classroom and laboratory facilities are wholly inadequate to 
teach the young men and women who have been admitted. This larger 
enrollment had not been anticipated until next year but due primarily 
to the fact that jobs are plentiful, more upperclassmen were able 
to earn enough money during the summer months to permit them to 
return to the University this fall. For this reason, Mr. Mather 
stated that we have today the enrollment we had budgeted for the 
fall of 1954. In terras of teachers, this means that the 18 
teachers that have been requested in the 1955 budget are actually 
needed on the campus today if the University is to maintain its 
faculty-student ratio. Mr. Mather then stressed the need for 
three additional buildings: the Women's Physical Education Build- 
ing, the addition to the Chemistry Building and a Classroom Build- 
ing. These buildings are needed today to adequately house the 
students who are on the campus. They are needed to replace the 
unsafe classrooms and offices in the Chapel, Liberal Arts Annex, 
North College, Mathematics Building and the Drill Hall. 

Provost Mather also discussed some of the major items in 
the Maintenance Budget for the 1955 fiscal year and distributed 
figures summarizing the budget askings. 

In the general discussion that followed in which each 
member of the group was asked to express his opinions, it was 
agreed that every effort should be made to build the Student Union 
Building on a self-liquidating basis by charging the students a fee 
that could be used to offset the rentals to the Building Associa- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tion. It was agreed that it was not the proper time to approach 
the General Court for an appropriation for a Student Union Build- 
ing when there was more critical need for classrooms, laboratories 
and physical education facilities. 

There was a general discussion about tuition rates as 
it had been indicated that the question has been raised 
occasionally about increasing the tuition so that the University 
would be self-supporting to a greater degree. It was the general 
consensus of the group that tuition should not be increased but 
that a student fee to support a Student Union Building would be 
highly desirable. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 




Secretary 



Tuition 



1802 



COMMITTEE 



Classroom 
Building 



Student 

Union 

Building 



Architects 

for 
Classroom 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 28, 1953, 10:00 A.M., Office of the President, Amherst 

Chairman "Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Taber, 

Provost Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather and the Campus 

Planning Council, and after study of campus maps and site plans, 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
site immediately north of North College for 

construction of the proposed Classroom Build- 
ing. 

And it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
site directly across Ellis Drive from the 
proposed Classroom Building for construction 
of the Student Union Building. 

There followed discussion of architects for the Classroom 

Building and it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve an 

architect for the proposed Classroom Build- 
ing in the following priority choice: 

1. J. R. Hampson of Pittsfield 

2. Cram & Ferguson of Boston 

3. Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and 
Abbott of Boston 

and that the Trustees request the Division of Public Construction 

to employ an architect from the above priority list to prepare 

studies for preliminary plans for the Classroom Building. 



I 



L 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of Mr. Brehm, Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds, of Professor McGuirk, Head of the Division 

of Physical Education, and of Mr. TrJhitmore, Chairman of the 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
running track in the Cage of the Physical 
Education Building as completed August 15, 

1953. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Hays property which is 
located to the south of Chadbourne and Greenough dormitories is now 
on the market at $22,000. There is about one acre of land and a 
nine room house and garage. After discussion of the location and 
the size of the property, the committee took no action. 

Trustee Whitmore raised question as to other property 

which might be available adjacent to the campus and which would be 

needed for future growth. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees request the 
Treasurer to investigate the ownership and 
availability of the land located southeast 
of the present athletic field. 

The committee discussed the matter of plaques for Leach 

and Crabtree dormitories as referred to them by the full Board and 

it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following wording; 

LEACH HOUSE 
In honor of Lottie A. Leach 
Trustee of the University 1932-1936, 1945-1952 
Erected in 1953 through the efforts of the Associate Alumni 
By the University of Massachusetts Building Association 



1 



I 



Running 
Track 



Hays 
Property 



Land 



/ 



Leach House 
Plaque 



1804 



COMMITTEE 

Crabtree House 
Plaque 



Chapel 
Plaque 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CRABTREE HOUSE 
In honor of Lotta Crabtree, 1847-1924. 
Benefactor of the University 
Erected in 1953 through the efforts of the Associate Alumni 
By the University of Massachusetts Building Association 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Librarian has asked 

for advice concerning the disposition of a plaque vhich formerly 

hung on the walls of the Chapel, announcing that the clock face 

had been presented by the Class of f 92. Apparently the plaque was 

removed and discarded some years ago during the remodeling of the 

Old Chapel. A staff member had located it and has saved it since 

then and has now presented it to the Library, It was 

VOTED,: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the re-erection of the plaque in the Old 
Chapel . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 P.M. 




Secretary 



I V *H — — be P re8ea:rfc a "k * Re meting °£ "^ 6 
vill not . ft, ,. 

Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in 
the President's Office at the University on Wednesday, 
October 2S at 10:00 A.M. 



/ Sig 



Signature 



I hereby agree to vaive 7 days* notice of the see ting of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called to con- 
vena for Wednesday, October 28, at 10:00 *.M. at the office 

of the ^resident of the University, Ataherst, Massachusetts* 



} 



Signature 



I 



I ^^ . k® Present at the meeting of the 
will not . ..... 

Trustee Comaittee on Buildings and Grounds to be held In 
the President's Office at the University on Wednesday, 
October 28 at 10s 00 A,M» 

Signature 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days* notice of the -aeeting of 
the Coimaittee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called to con- 
vena for Wednesday, October 2$, at 30*00 *.M. a t the office 
of the ^resident of the University, Amherst, Massachusetts. 




" » * " • > i » 



Signature 



% vf& «___ &• present at the meeting of the 



Trustee Coasaittee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in 
the President*,? Off tea at the University on Wednesday, 
October 23 at 10:00 A.M. 

■? 




Signature 



I berefcy agree to vaive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of ?4assachusetts called to oon- 
veiefor Wednesday, October 28, at 10:00 *.M* at tho office 
of the ^resident of the University, Amherst, Massachusetts. 




, <^*c-~&--c — V. 



n < 1 1 ii ■ i « —»— — wwwKwmw 



Signature 






II 






* ^H be present at the raeeting of the 
will not 



Trustee Coasaittee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in 
the President *s Office at the University on Wednesday, 
October 2S at 10*00 A.M. 



fSifloatar 



• • 






I hereby agree to waive 7 days 1 notice of the meeting of 
the Comaittee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called to con- 
vene for Wednesday, October 28, at 10:00 *,M, at the office 
of the ^resident of the University, Amherst, Massachusetts, 



* J 




Signature 



1 






V 



I 



* ^H >^v be present at the meeting of the 
will not ._ 

Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds tc be held In 
th© President's Office at the University on Wednesday, 
October 28 at 10:00 A.M, 

/ Signature 



I herety agree to waive 7 days' notice of the Meeting of 
the Committee on Buiic&ngg and Grounds of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called to con- 
vene for Wednesday „ October 28, at lOsOO A.M. at the office 
of the ^resident of the University, Aaiherst^ Maseaohudstts* 




Signature 



I 



;OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

December 3, 1953, 1:00 p.m., Office of Chairman Bartlett, 

Boston, Mass. 



I 



Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, McDermott, 
Boyden, Brett, Cashin, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

The committee discussed the endowment funds portfolio 

held by the Trustees and considered recommendations made by B. L. 

Moody of the First National Bank of Amherst and of Chairman 

Haigis and Treasurer Johnson. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to buy three rights of the 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
and to use these rights together with 60 
rights in the account of the Trustees at 
the First National Bank of Amherst to sub- 
scribe to $900 worth of convertible de- 
bentures of the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company 3 3/4-S due 1965, using 
uninvested cash for this purpos©. 

It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to convert into capital 
stock of the company $600 worth of 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
convertible debentures 3 1/2 s due July 31, 
1964., using uninvested cash for the con- 
version price. 

It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the Treasurer to sell the following securi- 
ties. 

5,000 Great Northern Bailway, Gen. 3 l/8s - due 1990 
4,000 Louisville & Nashville Railway, 1st & Refunding 

2 7/3 s - due 2003 
156 shares Remington Rand Inc. Common 

10 shares Marshall Field 4J56 Preferred 

10 shares General Cigar Co. 7% Preferred 



! 5 



Investments 



Shares 



Securities 



1806 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

100 shares R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Common 
and to invest the proceeds therefrom together with 
uninvested cash balances (approximately $2900) in 
the Endowment Fund Principal Account in common 
stock of Virginia Electric & Power Co, and Hartford 
Electric Light Co. 

Mr. Haigis suggested that the whole Endowment Fund 

portfolio should be re-examined before the February meeting of 

the Board and after discussion, it was 

VOTED : To request the Finance Committee to 
examine the Endowment Fund portfolio 
prior to the February meeting of the 
Board of Trustees and to be prepared 
to make recommendations at that time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 




_Secretary 



\ 



I 



OMM1TTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 3, 1953, 1:00 p.m., Office of Chairman Bartlett, 

Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Cashin, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



The Secretary announced that Sanford Keedy, District 
Attorney, Hampshire County, had mailed to the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity a newspaper clipping addressed to all persons interested 
in the estate of Arthur K. Harrison, late of Amherst. The item 
stated that a petition has been presented to the Probate Court for 
probate of a certain instrument purporting to be the last will of 
said deceased by The First National Bank of Amherst in said County, 
praying that it be appointed executor thereof, without giving a 
surety on its bond. 

The committee noted the communication. 

Treasurer Johnson announced that the lowest bid re- 
ceived for construction of the Public Health Building is 
$1,526, lS^.. 10. This amount is approximately one-half million 
dollars above the amount of available funds for constriction. He 
said that the building was intended to serve the State Department 
of Health in western Massachusetts, certain Federal Health activi- 
ties, and to provide offices and laboratories for the University 1 s 
Department of Bacteriology, School of Nursing, and Out-Patient 
Department. 

The Treasurer said that Provost Mather and he had 
arranged a conference for 10:00 a.m. this day to discuss the 



Estate of 
Arthur K. 
Harrison 



Public Health 
Building 



1808 



COMMITTEE 



Durfee 

Plant 

House 



Extension 
of Steam 
Lines 



Extension 
of Electric 
Lines 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

matter with the State Public Health authorities. The meeting 

could not be held, however, because the Commissioner was called 

away to attend a patient. Questions to be explored are: 

Is additional Federal money available? If 
not will the Public Health Department request 
additional funds in their budget? Or should 
the building be redesigned so that the cost 
of construction will come within the appro- 
priation. 

After discussion the committee 

VOTED ; That in view of the emergency needs of the 
University for classroom space for students 
now enrolled, the Trustees will not request 
further appropriations for the construction 
of the Public Health Building. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the low bid for con- 
struction of the Botanical Building, which is to replace Durfee 
Range, was |69,63^.. The appropriation is $70,000. After discussion 
it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to enter into 
contract in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees for construction of a Botanical 
Building by the Burnham Corporation of 
Belmont, Massachusetts, at cost of $69*634. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to enter into 
contract in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees with the Hartwell Company of 
Providence, Rhode Island, for extension 
of certain steam lines at cost of f^2,920 - 
this being the lowest bid received. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to enter into 
contract in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees with the Collins Electric 
Company of Springfield for extension of 
certain electric lines at cost of $39>995 - 
the lowest bid received for this work. 






I 



OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In reply to question, the Treasurer stated that bids for 
construction projects are advertised in one Boston newspaper, one 
Springfield newspaper and in Dodge Reports. 

The Treasurer reported that the University has been under 

contract with the Navy Department for training of one student 

trainee and that the contract expires on August 31, 1953 • It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to renew the con- 
tract with the Navy Department in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees for the training 
of one student for the period September 1953 
to August 31, 1954. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Finance, 



i 



Navy Depart- 
ment Contract 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to buy three rights 
of the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and to use these rights together with 
60 rights in the account of the Trustees at 
the First National Bank of Amherst to subscribe 
to $900 worth of convertible debentures of the 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 3 3/^s 
due 1965> using uninvested cash for this purpose. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to convert into 
capital stock of the company |600 worth of 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
convertible debentures 3i s due July 31, 1964., 
using uninvested cash for the conversion 
price. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell the follow- 
ing securities: 

5,000 Great Northern Railway, General 3 l/8s - due 1990 
4,000 Louisville & Nashville Railway, 1st & Refunding 

2 7/3s - due 2003 
156 shares Remington Rand Inc. Common 

10 shares Marshall Field U\% Preferred 

10 shares General Cigar Co. 7% Preferred 
100 shares R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Common 
and to invest the proceeds therefrom together with in- 
vested cash balances (approximately $2900) in the Endow- 
ment Fund Principal Account in common stock of Virginia 
Electric & Power Company and Hartford Electric Light Company, 



Investments 



Shares 



Securities 



1810 



COMMITTEE 



Classroom 

Building 



Student 
Union 

Building 



Running 
Track 



Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To examine the Endowment Fund portfolio prior 
to the February meeting of the Board of 
Trustees and to be prepared to make recommenda- 
tions at that time. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the site immediately north of 

North College for construction of the pro- 
posed Classroom Building. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the site directly across Ellis 
Drive from the proposed Classroom Building 
for construction of the Student Union 
Building. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve an architect for the proposed 

Classroom Building in the following priority 
choice: 

J. R. Hampson of Pittsfield 
Cram and Ferguson of Boston 
Shepley, Richardson, Bulfinch and Abbott of Boston 

And to request the Division of Public Con- 
struction to employ an architect from the 
above priority list to prepare studies for 
preliminary plans for the Classroom Building. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the running track in the Cage of 

the Physical Education Building as completed 
August 15, 1953. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the treasurer to investigate the 
ownership and availability of the land lo- 
cated southeast of the present athletic field. 



P 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Plaques 



Leach House 
plaque 



Crabtree House 
plaque 



It was 

VOTED : To approve the erection of plaques in 
Leach and Crabtree dormitories by the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Association, the plaques to read as 
follows: 

LEACH HOUSE 
In honor of Lottie A. Leach 
Trustee of the University 1932-1936, 1945-1952 
Erected in 1953 through the efforts of the Associate Alumni 
By the University of Massachusetts Building Association 

CRABTF.EE HOUSE 
In honor of Lotta Crabtree, 13^7-1942 
Benefactor of the University 
Erected in 1953 through the efforts of the Associate Alumni 
By the University of Massachusetts Building Association 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Army has replaced the 

tanks used by the Armored ROTC Corps with new and larger tanks and 

has requested an increase in the amount of the military property 

bond to |630,000. This is a quarteraaster general bond and there 

is no cost to state universities for carrying the bond. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. Johnson, 
to increase the military property bond to 
$630,000 in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees. 

There was discussion of various inquiries concerning the Land at 

Waltham Field 
possibility that the Trustees might sell certain land at the waltham Station 

Field Station. The Treasurer reported that the property in question 

had been given to the Trustees for educational purposes. In view 

of this restriction, the committee took no action. 

The meeting was adjourned_at 3*25 p.m. 



1811 



Military 
Property 
Bond 








_Secretary 



AaT^olaJSJUL 



Chairman 



1812 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



PAGES 1812-1926 NOT USED.